Silversmiths & Allied Trades - The Channel Islands

For information you'd like to share - Post it here - not for questions
dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42856
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades - The Channel Islands

Postby dognose » Sat Sep 28, 2019 12:53 pm

CHARLES T. MAINE

35, King Street, St. Helier, Jersey

A Charles T. Maine example:

Image

Image

Image

Image
C.T.M - London - 1903


See: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=15471&p=73650&hilit=maine#p73650

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42856
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades - The Channel Islands

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 05, 2019 4:56 am

At Guernsey, on Friday morning, a fire broke out in a jeweller's shop. and Mrs. Salter, aged 84, and Miss Bourne, her granddaughter, aged 21, who were sleeping in an upper part of the building, were suffocated.

Source: The Chester Courant - 27th April 1904

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42856
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades - The Channel Islands

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 13, 2020 4:23 am

At St. Helier's, Jersey, on Wednesday morning, the police discovered a watchmaker and his paramour dead in their bedroom, both having been shot. The man was covered with a quilt, and the circumstances tend to show that the woman killed the man and then committed suicide.

Source: Western Mail - 12th May 1881

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42856
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades - The Channel Islands

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 15, 2020 4:39 am

JOHN LE ROY

Charing Cross, St. Helier, Jersey


AN IRON MASK FOR A DRUNKEN WIFE

At the police-court, at Jersey, on Monday, John Le Roy, an elderly man, a watchmaker and greengrocer, carrying on business at Charing Cross, was charged with having cruelly ill-treated his wife by having, among other things, fastened her head in an iron mask, the latter offence having been committed on the Saturday previous. This invention for curing a drunken wife, was produced in court, and excited no little astonishment. It consisted of two stout iron rings of about a quarter of an inch thick, attached to each other by vertical bars of strong hoop-iron, each at least an inch wide. One of the rings was about nine inches in diameter, and the other six inches, the smaller part resting upon the shoulders when the instrument was placed in position. The bars were about two inches apart, and to prevent the wearer getting anything to her mouth a piece of iron was placed across two of the bars in front. It weighed three pounds. It turned out, however, on trial that she was able to defeat this object by reversing the mask during the short time (about an hour) that she had it on and drinking a glass of spirits. The mask opened with a hinge in front, and was fastened behind with a padlock. The wife, who had a half-stupid appearance, said that the prisoner forced the mask over her head while she was in a kneeling posture. She contrived to let some of the neighbours see it on her head, and they sent for the police, who went to the house and compelled the prisoner to take it off. In addition to this and other ill-treatment, the prisoner had sometimes shut her up in a large box, on which he had put iron bars, making it resemble a cage. Beyond the confinement she had suffered no injury, as there was ample room in it. The prisoner, on being asked by the magistrate what he had to say, replied that what he had done was solely for the purpose of curing his wife of her drunken habits. He had tried various means, and had placed her five times in the workhouse. He had locked her up at home, but she escaped by the window in order to get drink. He did not know he was acting illegally by putting the mask on his wife, or he would not have done so. The wife, who admitted the truth of what the prisoner said, expressed herself willing to accept 5s. per week and leave her husband. The latter agreed to this, and was then fined 10s. for the assault on his wife. The mask remains in the possession of the police.


Source: The Western Mail - 4th February 1870

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 42856
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades - The Channel Islands

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 09, 2020 12:42 pm

PETER LE PAGE

24, Smith Street, Guernsey


Letters to the Editor

The Presentation Cup and Clock


Sir, The para. in your last issue, stating the supplying of the cup and clock for the Officer's Mess, etc.of the Middlesex, was by open competition, is very incorrect. The fact is, the silversmiths here were not even asked to compete.

Yours, etc.

Peter Le Page
Silversmith, Jeweller, etc.
24, Smith Street.


Source: The Star; Guernsey - 2nd October 1897

Trev.


Return to “Contributors' Notes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Majestic-12 [Bot] and 10 guests