South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 28, 2012 2:41 pm

S.D. TROSS

Kroonstad, Orange River Colony

The oldest established jewellery business in Kroonstad is the one conducted by Mr. S. D. Tross. It was started about forty years ago by a Mr. A. Wagner and carried on by him until it passed into the hands of Mr. C. Hartung, from whom it was eventually taken over sixteen years ago by its present proprietor. The establishment, therefore, is a well known landmark in local commerce. But its long reputation is not its chief attraction or recommendation to the would-be purchaser of the many beautiful articles which it displays. Mr. Tross has kept pace with the march of fashion and progress in everything pertaining to his trade, and the stock of precious materials that glitter in great variety within his premises not only affords a wide field for selection to all those on the outlook for pretty and novel designs in jewellery, watches, and kindred goods but also illustrates the wonderful triumphs of artistic, elaborate, and ingenious manufacture. These include numerous and extremely fine specimens of Mr Tross's own make, which are on an equality with the best imported, and show how thoroughly he understands his business. In the operative departments he manifests a skill that is the outcome of a life devoted to the study and practice of the most effective methods of process and result. Engraving, gilding, electro-plating, and repairs of every description are executed by him in a manner that leaves nothing to be desired. Watches are sometimes brought to him in apparently the most hopeless condition –so hopeless that the average individual would consider them of no further use. But after being operated on by Mr. Tross they become in many instances stronger and more reliable than they were originally. In fact, there is nothing associated with the trade that he is not able to accomplish. He deals also in fancy goods of all kinds: so that his establishment appeals in many ways to the patronage of the public.

Mr. Tross, who comes from Guernsey, is one of Kroonstad's most respected townsmen. To him also belongs the large business known as S. D. Tross & Co., to which we would next direct the attention of our readers. We may mention that the illustrations of Bloem's Spruit in our historical section are reproductions from photographs taken by Mr. Tross.


Source: The Orange River Colony: An Illustrated, Historical, Descriptive and Commercial Review - Macmillan & Ferguson - 1905

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 29, 2012 5:55 pm

JOHN MARIE THOMAS

6, Plein Street, Cape Town

Noted as a Jeweller and Goldsmith of 6, Plein Street, Cape Town, in 1817.

Source: The Silversmiths and Goldsmiths of the Cape of Good Hope, 1652-1850 - Mollie N. Morrison - 1936

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 02, 2012 2:59 pm

WILLIAM WATT

Cross Street, Kroonstad

Our review of the commerce of Kroonstad must include the business of Mr. William Watt, who illustrates in a very efficient manner the various branches of skilled work connected with the watchmaking and jewellery trade. His attractive establishment in Cross Street is handsomely appointed, and every advantage is taken of its equipment to display in a tasteful and methodical manner the wealth of beautiful articles comprising the stock. We know that "all that glitters is not gold," but here we have the glitter of the genuine article, and the bright and well ordered interior of the shop is the casket in which a large number of gems and precious materials are kept.

The increasing production and cheapening of watches is one of the commercial phenomena, and the enormous variety of their designs and qualities finds demonstration in the extensive assortment which Mr. Watt holds, ranging from serviceable articles within the reach of the poorest member of the community to very valuable specimens that only the wealthy can purchase.

The glittering exhibition of brooches, bracelets, pins, rings, etc., is particularly interesting, and diamonds, rubies, sapphires, emeralds, opals, and other precious stones sparkle and glisten with ever changing fire as the visitor moves about the shop. Magnificent presentation plate of all kinds can also be procured here; while the collection of clocks should be viewed by anyone desirous of obtaining something out of the common– a timekeeper that will not only faithfully record the passing minutes and hours, but will combine those novel and ornamental features which the leading manufacturers are ever striving to exemplify in their best productions.

Mr. Watt is also a fancy goods dealer and stationer, and his assortments of the numerous articles that come within the scope of these departments afford a very comprehensive selection to those whose wants pertam thereto.

Mr. Watt has been established in Kroonstad about ten years, and has built up an important and flourishing cornern. He owns a large amount of property in the town, including one or two very handsome commercial establishments in Cross Street. At the time of our visit he was on one of his periodical trips to England and his business was under the able management of Mr. G. Lowe.


Source: The Orange River Colony: An Illustrated, Historical, Descriptive and Commercial Review - Macmillan & Ferguson - 1905

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 06, 2012 1:10 pm

E. DUSTING & Co.

274, Church Street East, Pretoria

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E. Dusting & Co. - Pretoria - 1908

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 06, 2012 5:55 pm

BENJAMIN ROSENBLATT

Information Desired.

A Watchmaker, named Benjamin Rosenblatt, died in Johannesberg, South Africa, on February 26th, 1903. We are informed that he left his Wife and 6 or 8 Children in America some 20 years ago. As he left an estate we shall be glad if some one can inform us of the whereabouts of his children, in order that they may make the necessary application, produce their identification papers and claim their father's property now in the hands of the Supreme Court, Pretoria, Transvaal. Address this office.


Source: The Menorah - Volumes 38-39 - Jewish Chautauqua Society - 1905

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 10, 2012 4:02 pm

HARRIS & Co.

84, Adderley Street, Cape Town, and Du Toits Pan Road, Kimberley

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Harris & Co. - Cape Town and Kimberly - 1896

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 20, 2012 5:42 am

DIRECTORY OF GRAHAM'S TOWN 1842

Daniell, P.C. - Jeweller - Chapel Street*
Marsh, T. - Watchmaker - Chapel Street
Rhodes, C. - Watchmaker - High Street**
Rhodes, E. - Watchmaker - New Street
Rhodes, J. - Watchmaker - New Street and High Street***
Roulston, R. - Watchmaker - High Street
Tildersly - Goldsmith - Beaufort Street****

Source: The Cape of Good Hope and Eastern Province of Algoa Bay - John Centlivres Chase - 1843

*Likely to be Peter Clarke Daniel (See page 4 of this topic)
** Likely to be Charles Rhodes, noted on the Graham's Town Voter's List of 1853, as of Hill Street.
***Likely to be Joseph Rhodes, noted on the Graham's Town Voter's List of 1853, as of New Street.
****Likely to be Samuel Tildersly, noted on the Graham's Town Voter's List of 1853, as of Hill Street.

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed May 30, 2012 3:06 pm

J. HAMMON

237, Church Street, Pietermaritzburg

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J. Hammon - Pietermaritzburg - 1897

Jeweller to his Excellency. Established in 1872.

Mr. Hammon, jeweller, Maritzburg, has offered to the Education Department a silver challenge shield for part-singing. The value of the shield is about £80. There are three similar shields in Cape Colony-one for schools in or near Capetown, one for schools in or near Port Elizabeth, and the other for Railway Schools. The Natal Challenge Shield will be competed for in June next in two centres-–Maritzburg and Durban. Only Government and Government Aided Schools may compete, and the number in any school choir must not exceed thirty. Every choir will be required to sing three pieces of its own selection. The winning school will hold the shield for one year, and each member of its choir will receive a silver medal.

Source: Departmental Reports - Natal - 1899

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 04, 2012 7:26 am

MAPPIN & WEBB Ltd.

Mappin House, Plein Street, Johannesburg.

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Mappin & Webb - Johannesburg - 1916


Some images of the Mappin & Webb Johannesburg shop following the transformation of their oldest overseas branch in 1960.


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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Jul 06, 2012 5:21 am

DANIEL BEETS

Cape Town

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Daniel Beets was the illegitimate son of Balthus Wilhelm Beets of Neubrandenburg and Angana, Cape Colony. He was working as a silversmith in Rooze Street, Cape Town during the period 1812 - 1814 and then removed to Kasteel Street from 1814 until 1820. Beets returned to Rooze Street, where he is listed at No. 18, in the 'The African Court Calendar and Directory' of 1822, from 1820 - 1828. He married Anna Maria Petronella Bedeker on 6 April 1794. His son Daniel Godlieb Beets was born in 1795 and was also a silversmith trading 1836-1855.

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Jul 14, 2012 12:19 pm

JOHN TOWNSEND

5 Heeregracht, Cape Town

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John Townsend's working period was 1824 to 1841.


The Undersigned begs to announce that he has lately received an addition to his Business in the person of another Watchmaker, a superior Workman in Chronometers, Watches, Clocks and Musical Boxes; and is enabled to promise that what may be entrusted to him will be well done and expeditiously.
J. TOWNSEND
5 Heeregracht


Source: South African Commercial Advertiser - 14th February 1838


REMOVAL
Mrs. WELCH begs leave to notify her Customers and the Public generally she has removed from her Residence in St.George’s-street, to that lately occupied by Mr. J. TOWNSEND, Jeweller, where she earnestly solicits their kind patronage and liberal support — her Stock of Hosiery, Haberdashery, Silks, Poplins, Ribbons, and other Articles of useful manufacture, being equal, if not superior, to any in the Colony.


Source: South African Commercial Advertiser - 13th March 1841

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 04, 2012 10:11 am

SIMPSON

Johannesburg, Transvaal

In February last, the premises of Mr. Simpson, Johannesburg, Transvaal, were broken into and £3,000 worth of jewellery stolen. In ' connection' with the robbery two men were arrested, and two were believed to have made their escape over British territory. After the arrival of the steamship 'Umballa' in the London Dock from Port Natal, a young man named Walter Scott, who gave his age as. 21, and his occupation as ah engineer, on being searched) was found to be in possession of 23 silver watches, which were sewn up in Iris shirt sleeve. He stated they were given him by the second steward to bring out of the dock for a second-class passenger ; this led to the arrest of the second steward. The watches were afterwards identified as being part of the Johannesburg robbery. It does not appear that Scott was taken into custody immediately, but by Detective Gumner, at the Albion Hotel, Blackfriars, where he was found in bed. Under his pillow were found some nuggets of gold and watches, one of the latter being marked " Simpson, Johannesburg." Prisoner then attempted to bribe the detective, but he very laudably replied, "We don't do business like that here." Prisoner and his luggage were, then conveyed to Leman-street Police-station. In his box were found a large number of articles of jewellery amounting to about £2,000. The prisoners were then remanded, and brought up again together with a stowaway on April 8th. Mr. St. John Wontner prosecuted. He said he had communicated with the Colonial Office, and was waiting for a reply. He wanted to hear if the Government would send Scott back in order that he might be tried with the others, now in custody, at Johannesburg. It might not be in the power of the Government to send him back, but there had already been several similar cases in point. If the authorities could not do that, then it would be his duty to take other steps to prevent a gross failure of justice. He had asked the Chief Commissioner of Police if he would be willing to keep the property; but, in any event, the wife, who held her husband's power of attorney, would be able to sue the police or the prisoner Scott, and the Court of Chancery would readily grant an injunction to prevent the jewellery from being parted with until the case had been settled. His client would then ultimately regain restitution of the property by action of law. If Scott could not be sent back, then the case would have to be dealt with as one of unlawful possession under the Police Act. Mr. Dickinson said the difficulty in this case was that Scott was taken into custody in a house, and it had been held that the Police Act did not apply to such a case. On a re-hearing, the magistrate ordered the prisoners to be discharged from custody.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st May 1891


The Proceeds of the Johannesburg Robbery.–The Chief Commissioner of Police has been summoned under the Summary Jurisdiction Act for detaining a large quantity of jewellery, the proceeds of the burglary at Johannesburg. – Mr. St. John Wontner, who appeared in support of the summons, said a short time since three men were charged with being in the possession of a large quantity of property, which was proved to have been the proceeds of a burglary at Johannesburg. Inasmuch as that Court had no jurisdiction in the matter, his worship had to discharge the men, and the property remained in the hands of the Commissioner of Police. –Mrs. Sarah Simpson, of St. Andrew's-road, Southsea, the wife of the owner of the jewellery, said she acted for her husband under a power of attorney.–Mr. Dickinson said that was sufficient, and he made an order for the delivering up of the property to Mrs. Simpson. We cannot help feeling that there is something radically wrong in the law, or the way it is administered, when a magistrate is able to dispose of goods found in possession of a defendant and yet have no jurisdiction over him. It was said at the former hearing of the case that he ought to have been arrested in the street. Could he not have been re-arrested
in the street and charged with unlawful possession ?


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st June 1891

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 19, 2012 11:53 am

A.J. HENOCHSBERG & Co.

London and Johannesburg

Founded by Alfred Isaac Henochsberg. This company was styled A.J. Henochsberg & Sons after Julius Joseph Henochsberg and Ernest Manuel Henochsberg joined the firm in 1896. The London address was recorded as Basing House, 17 & 18, Basinghall Street in 1897.

In Johannesburg they traded under the name of United Manufacturers' Agency and B. Danziger's successors.

A.J. Henochsberg & Sons entered marks at the London Assay Office (AJH&S in an oblong punch).

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Sep 24, 2012 3:21 pm

P.A. COLLOT

481, West Street, Durban, and Delagoa Bay

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P.A. Collot - Durban - 1899

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 18, 2013 3:55 pm

AMOS & TUCKER

20, Church Street, Pietermaritzburg, and Field Street, Durban

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Amos & Tucker - Pietermaritzburg - 1867

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Amos & Tucker - Pietermaritzburg - 1867

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 26, 2013 9:17 am

COLLINS & LIST BROTHERS

55, Pritchard Street, Johannesburg

See above post for Collins Brothers, and List Brothers.

Louis Napoleon Bonaparte Collins was born in London in 1866, he may well have served his apprenticeship as a watch and clock maker under the firm of E.J. Dent & Co. as his family are in possession of a photograph of Louis Collins working on the clock of Big Ben at Westminster.

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Lou Collins in 1907

Following his arrival in Johannesburg Louis Collins carried out several important commissions, including the installation of the clock in the Cathedral of St Michael and St George in Grahamstown, and the clock at the old South African Post Office building in Johannesburg. He was noted as residing in the suburb of Parkview, Johannesburg.

In 1907 Lou Collins was noted as being the Principal of List Brothers, who were Watch and Clockmakers, Masonic and General Jewellers of Pritchard Street, Johannesburg. It appears that later the firm combined with that of perhaps a relation of Lou's, E.A.O. Collins of Collins Brothers, Jewellers and Silver Platers, who were also located at Pritchard Street. The Principal of Collins Brothers appears to have been Ernest Collins, and it is likely that this pairing became the business of Collins & List Brothers.

Lou Collins died in South Africa in 1924, the business of Collins & List Brothers continued and was recorded into the 1970's at least.

I am grateful to member RCollins for providing us with the details of his great grandfather.

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 27, 2013 4:34 am

FORSYTH & Co.

165, Church Street, Maritzburg

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Forsyth & Co. - Maritzburg - 1897

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 28, 2013 10:15 am

JAMES GAUGAIN

Port Elizabeth

Jas. GAUGAIN

Watch Maker and Jeweller

Begs to acquaint the inhabitants of Port Elizabeth and surrounding Country Districts that he has again commenced Business in this town, opposite the Stores of Messrs. KAY, HESS & Co, and trust that by strict attention and moderate charges to meet the public patronage. Watches, Clocks and Musical Boxes cleaned and repaired; Watch Glasses of all sizes. Jewellery repaired and made to Order on the shortest Notice. Wedding Rings &c always on hand.


Source: Port Elizabeth Mercury - 21st February 1852

Perhaps to be identified with Phillip Gaugain who was working in Cape Town in the late 1820's (see above post).

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 04, 2013 8:23 am

KERBY & HUBER

191, Church Street, Maritzburg

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Kerby & Huber - Maritzburg - 1897

In 1893 Kerby & Huber were victims of a large robbery at their premises, following a break in, they lost over £800 of stock.

By 1898 this business was styled 'E G Kerby & Co.' (see above post) and trading from the same address.

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 07, 2013 8:08 am

GEORGE PRESCOTT PERKS

Market Square, King Williams Town

G.P. PERKS
Watchmaker and Jeweller
Jewellery made to order. Repairs to watches and jewellery in best style.
All orders answered by return post
Market Square, King Williams Town


Source: Farmer's Chronicle - 5th November 1886

George Prescott Perks was born at London on the 29th March 1832, the son of Thomas Perks. He married Caroline Mary Anne George in c.1858 in Cape Province. He died at King William's Town on the 5th November 1892.

The business was likely carried on his son, Henry George Perks, who was born on the 26th July 1862 at King William's Town and died there on the 20th January 1931, and was noted as a Jeweller at King William's Town. Henry George Perks was noted as marrying Ada Butler at King William's Town in c.1883.

Following the death of Henry George Perks the business was continued by his daughter, Kate (b.1892, d.1976), together with a Mr Burnell who was Jeweller and Watchmaker.



G.P. Perks was recorded as a Jeweller in Taylor Street and Ayliff Street, and Woolwash and Mill Property, King William's Town in 1877.

Source: The Port Elizabeth Directory and Guide to the Eastern Province of the Cape of Good Hope for 1877

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