South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu May 15, 2014 9:33 am

RICHARD CROSS aka RICHARD TALBOT

THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE
(From the Morning Chronicle)

The General Screw Steamer Hellespont, Captain Watts, arrived at Plymouth at 4 A.M. yesterday, having left the Cape of Good Hope on the evening of the 3d of August. She brings home a large mail and a good number of passengers, but the news by her is much of the same character, as regards the war, as that which we have hitherto received. Amongst the persons on board is Richard Cross, the bankrupt silversmith, who absconded from his creditors at Southampton, and under the name of Talbot proceeded to the Cape in the Queen of the South with a large amount of property belonging to his creditors. The Queen of the South having been detained at St. Vincent, she was only a few hours ahead of the Hellespont, in which an officer went out to apprehend Cross, but a custom-house officer, named Rowan, had previously got information which led him to apprehend the prisoner.


Source: The Glasgow Herald - 10th September 1852

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 25, 2014 1:09 pm

JOHN IRELAND

Bulawayo, Rhodesia

WINNER IS A LOSER

Bulawayo, Rhodesia (AP) - The top prize in the state lottery, about $100,000, was awarded today to the estate of a Bulawayo watchmaker, John Ireland. He drowned last week on a fishing trip, officials said.


Source: Spokane Daily Chronicle - 14th February 1980

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 26, 2014 2:42 pm

MAURICE JOSEPH & SONS

Main Street, Port Elizabeth


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Source: Foreign Mission Chronicle of the Episcopal Church in Scotland, Together with the Kaffrarian Diocesan Quarterly - 1893



Messrs. Joseph & Sons, of Port Elizabeth, exhibited a magnificent range of diamond and gold jewellery, gold and crocidolite jewellery–all elegantly and artistically finished.

These exhibits of colonial-made jewellery and other articles in variety showed what can be done in the colony with gold and precious stones, and demonstrated that we have the necessary skill, taste and other requisites to hand for the satisfaction of all requirements. Ladies might reasonably initiate the custom of receiving presents of the goldsmith and silversmith's art only when made in the colony.


Source: The South African Exhibition, Port Elizabeth, 1885: lectures, prize and other essays, jury reports and awards. Edited by Charles Cowen F.F.S. - 1886

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Jul 02, 2014 2:44 pm

HERMAN HILSER RITTER


Parcel Post and Auction Sales

Herman Hilser Ritter, Jeweller, said:

Speaking on behalf of all the principal jewellers and as a deputation from the Mercantile Association, I wish to bring forward the following matters :–

Re Tariff.–The jewellers are content with the existing tariff, and would only like to ask Government for consistency on the present arrangement.

Grievances.– Our trade is adversely and seriously affected by indiscriminate dumping of jewellery, watches, silverware and electroplate through the local auctioneers. I wish to state at the outset that neither I personally nor the jewellers collectively have any intention or reason to cast adverse criticism upon any of the well-known local auctioneers, recognising as we do their mode of business to be perfectly proper and legitimate: but what we would like Government to do is to protect them (and thereby our trade) from being made innocent dupes of so-called smart business people, who make it their business to dump the local market from outside with goods not always correctly described by them, viz., part of the goods so exhibited not being for sale at all, and part being not for sale as advertised without reserve, whereby the public is misled and the local trade is disorganised and curtailed, large sums of money thus being taken out of the town which would under healthier conditions circulate amongst local establishments, for the benefit of the whole community. We consider such sellers to have an unfair advantage over local tradesmen, inasmuch as they do not contribute proportionately to the rates, taxes, licences and other obligatory charges and expenses, to say nothing of the charitable calls levied and made upon local establishments.

Remedy.–As a remedy I would suggest that a list be required by the authorities from the auctioneers of all the goods brought in from outside for sale by auction, setting out all and each lot as exhibited and to be submitted for public auction without reserve, the auctioneers to receive their commission and pay Government dues on the amount realised. 1 am of opinion that this would at least to some extent meet the case.

3059. Mr. Tod.] Do you mean the latter clause to refer to all goods sold here?
- No, only those goods which are dumped down here.

3060. From oversea ?--Yes, but not only those, but also those from Cape Town and other places overland.

3061. Mr. Kayser.] You mean oversea consignments of goods as well ?–Yes. I have made observations, and I find that part of the goods exhibited for public sale are in reality not for sale, but for show.

3062. Dr. Viljoen.] You mean that they are a decoy?–Yes.

3063. Mr. Tod.'] You do not propose to deal with these through the Customs tariff at all? - I do not see how it could possibly apply. What we want is to announce to the Commission that these grievances do exist and are a hardship to the legitimate trader.

3064. But it has nothing to do with the Customs tariff?–I was of that opinion myself. We do not wish the tariff altered at all, but that it should continue on the present basis.

3065. I suppose in your business you deal entirely with imported goods?–Yes, we could not lay any pretence to manufacture them, until the population has considerably increased.

3066. And you cannot make any suggestion whereby we can differentiate in the Customs tariff against, goods imported for sale by auction?–I hardly think it possible. I think the difficulty must be dealt with locally.

3067. Mr. Harlow.] You mentioned the matter of goods for sale by auction, and also local stocks offered for sale. How would you differentiate between the two? - My remark applied only to goods coming in from outside. Perhaps it could be done by amending the auctioneer's licences in some way, that they would be obliged In state where the things come from, and if coming from outside he would have to give a list of the lots to be submitted before the sale, and afterwards it could be seen if they were not sold and a tax put upon them.

3068. You mentioned just now the word dumping. What do you mean by that?- I mean the flooding of the market with goods to the detriment of local trade.

3069. The substance of your remarks is that the persons who attend these sales are often victimised, that they do not get good value for their money-? Yes.

3070. Mr. Pyott.] Your whole point is you want to keep out the stuff coming in here to be sold by auction ?- Yes.

3071. You would not prevent the merchant from sending certain goods to auction for sale? Not at all.

3072. But that when sold there they should be compelled to be sold without reserve? No, not in that case; that would only apply when brought in from outside.

3073. You want some protection as an importer of jewellery? Yes.

3074. But have you ever thought of the difficulty of the merchant who, having imported stuff, held it in stock for a month or more, then sends it up for sale by auction? There is that difficulty, but I think it may be overcome. It is only the special sales of jewellery and plate that we wish to get at. If a case of such goods was put on by a merchant the whole of it would be for sale for what it will realise, and it would most likely show a loss.

3075. But supposing that we want to help you by stopping those things; what is to prevent an auctioneer going to a merchant and saying, "I will give you 1 per cent, if you will import jewellery for me to sell." How would you deal with a case of that kind? My aim is particularly to voice the grievance which exists in the hope that the antidote may be found for it.

3076. Mr. Kayser.] If the Customs tariff is changed, how long would you suggest it should continue? We wish it to continue as it is now, and to remain in force for seven or ten years, or even longer; we only wish for consistency.

3077. What would be the shortest number of years?- I think seven or ten; five would be too short.

3078. With regard to your remarks as to dumping, what you want to suggest is that Government should put a higher duty on ?–Something of that sort. Or amend the auctioneering law to such an extent that Government get absolute control over what comes direct to the auctioneers, and then impose some tax which will level up the expenses of these importers to those of the local men.

3079. You mean that some charge should be made for covering your working expenses? Yes. Then there is another grievance; the travelling auctioneer.

3080. Mr. Scott.] You do not complain of jewellery sent through the post from oversea? I wish to support Mr. Badcock's remarks on that point. We suffer a great deal. It was not suggested to me I should speak on that point.

3081. What great advantage has an auctioneer over you in selling goods? He pays a licence and is domiciled here?–He is instructed by the seller, who is generally in the room, and he merely becomes the mouthpiece of the seller; no responsibility attaches to him after the sale is over.

3082. And you think some amendment of the auctioneer's licence will meet the case ?–Yes.

3083. But you have not made any suggestion?- No: I am not sufficiently versed in the present licence to do so.

3084. It is difficult to get at them unless we get some suggestion.–He might be compelled to furnish some list of the articles submitted, and made to sell without reserve; this would stop the special sales.

3085. Has this class of business increased lately?–Yes. Just before Christmas too, the market is flooded with such class goods.

3086. Do you think that applies also to furniture, as well as jewellery? Yes.

3087. Mr. Harlow.] The class of goods you sell are not real necessaries of life, are they? A portion of them are, such as wedding rings, watches, cutlery, electroplated ware, etc.

3088. It would not be any injustice if the tariff were raised? -Yes, to some extent it would, since cutlery, electroplated goods are necessary utensils and cannot be produced in the Colony. Would the Government allow raw material to come in free, such, for instance, as a piece of stamped material for completing into a serviceable article?

The Secretary.] Semi-manufactured article.

3089. Mr. Tod.] Do you know if this system of auctioneers' sales affects more businesses than your own?–Yes.

3090. Would you recommend that a special auction duty be placed on all goods imported to be sold by auction? Yes, if it could be done without militating in another direction.

3091. It would be a little bit of a tax in a trade of that nature?–Yes. I think it would do some good: but the difficulty I sec is how can there be a discrimination of that nature between goods imported in the ordinary way and goods imported for auction specially.

3092. Mr. Scott.'] There is much that comes direct to the auctioneer for disposal?--Yes, that is what we want to keep out.

3093. If these goods have to pay a special duty in addition to the ordinary tariff that would affect them?–Yes.


Source: Minutes of Evidence, with Index: Presented to Both Houses of Parliament by Command of His Excellency the Govenor - Cape of Good Hope (South Africa). Custom Tariff Commission - 1908

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 01, 2014 11:56 am

KATZ & LOURIE

Commissioner Street, later, corner of Market and Eloff Streets, Johannesburg


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Katz & Lourie - Johannesburg - 1919


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Katz & Lourie - Johannesburg - 1926

Established in 1895.


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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 08, 2014 2:59 pm

THE CAPE MINT (Pty) Ltd.

15a, Buitensingel Street, Cape Town


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Established in 1957 by Mauro Pagliari.

The company manufactured the Parliamentary Mace for the new Republic of South Africa in 1962. Made of 18ct gold, it is largest piece of worked gold in South Africa.

They also engraved The People's Mace, the symbol of authority of the National Assembly of Republic of South Africa in 2003 and produced the Black Rod of The Parliament of The Republic of South Africa in 2005.

The Cape Mint (Pty) Ltd is a subsidiary company of the Pagliari Group.

The mark of The Cape Mint:


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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 11, 2014 2:07 pm

W.H. ARMSTRONG & Co.

Cape Town

The business of W. H. Armstrong and Co. were noted as Engravers, Die Sinkers, etc. at Cape Town in 1903.

George E. Shelvoke was noted as being a partner in the firm.

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Aug 12, 2014 12:40 pm

W.E. BURMESTER & Co.

Church Street Central, Pretoria and Johannesburg


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W.E. Burmester & Co. - Johannesburg - 1895


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W.E. Burmester & Co. - Pretoria - 1908

Any connection with the firm of E. Burmester (see above post) of Cape Town is unknown at present.

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Aug 13, 2014 3:18 pm

W.C. SCHULLER

Rissik Street, Johannesburg


Early Discoveries of Diamonds. By David Draper

To me Saturday, Nov. 6, 1869, is a redletter day in the history of South Africa, for I happened to be present when Cornelis du Plooy, then owner of the farm Bultfontein, walked into the store of Mr. E. E. Hurley, now of Johannesburg, carrying in his hand a small bottle filled with stones, which he had collected on his homestead. Among these worthless pebbles there was one small diamond. When du Plooy was informed, his surprise found expression in the remark that there were so many of those things lying around on his place he did not consider them worth picking up. Lilienveld, Hurley and Hond purchased Bultfontein from du Plooy, and thus became possessors of the first true diamond mine in South Africa.

Prospecting operations on the adjoining farms, Dutoitspan and Vooruitzicht, resulted in the discovery of the Dutoitspan, Old De Beers and Kimberley mines. Jagersfontein was found after Dutoitspan and before Old De Beers. Twenty-four years later the Wesselton mine was discovered. Previous to the ‘dry diggings’ diamonds were found in the alluvial gravels of the Vaal and Riet rivers, and in the year 1873, in the small creek below the Lace mine, on the farm Driekopjes, Kroonstad District. Orange River Colony.

The following cutting from the Queenstown Representative, dated March 3, 1871, shows that diamonds were found in the Transvaal at a very early date:

“Great excitement was caused here a few days ago by young Joubert bringing in a diamond of 4½ carats, which he found on the farm of Mrs. Hennessy, 2½ miles from here (Pretoria). at once took steps, sent out a commission, Broderick, Lys, Skinner (the two former lately from the diamond fields), and their report is of such a nature that I have no doubt that in a week there will be quite a crowd at the new diggings. Piet Marais and H. Struben have taken a lease of part of the farm, and will commence operations at once. Several farmers have found diamonds on the banks of the Elands river. Two diamonds have been found at Zoutpansberg; the government has sent for them to be tested here-expected next week."

In 1870 a diamond had been found at Rustenburg. It was valued at £150. These finds were not considered as of much account. The diamonds were looked upon as emigrants, most likely lost by natives returning from the diamond fields.


In April, 1897, Mr. W. C. Schuller, watchmaker and jeweler, Rissik street, Johannesburg, brought a small bag containing minerals for me to inspect. He asked my opinion on the specimens, stating that his eldest son had pronounced them to be ‘Dwyka conglomerate.’ Upon my assuring him that they were ‘hard-bank’ from a diamond mine, he was greatly surprised, and became much excited. He told me that the specimens were from a farm held by him near Pretoria, and that if I was certain that they were from a diamond mine he would institute a search for diamonds, and he promised me a handsome reward.

Mr. Schuller informed me that he had taken up the property on the advice of a Mr. Van Diggelen, who assured him that the red specks in the rock (actually garnets) were cinnabar. Schuller told me that, as he knew nothing about diamonds and had no one to advise him, if I would assist him he would give me an interest in the property. In August, 1897, Mr. Schuller came again to see me, and he brought a small diamond which he stated had been found by Van der Merwe, the owner of the farm, near the spot where the ‘hard-bank’ cropped out. I agreed to visit the property the next day (Sunday) together with Mr. Schuller and Mr. F. W. Bawden. We found Mr. Schuller’s younger son at the mine, where he had dug a few shallow pits, all in diamondbearing mineral. I measured the circumference of the mine and investigated it generally, confirming my previous opinion that it was a true diamond-bearing pipe. Mr. Schuller requested me to instruct him in the method of searching for diamonds, stating that neither himself nor any one connected with the venture knew anything about the business. On my return to Johannesburg I requested Mr. M. E. Frames to go out to the property and teach Mr. Schuller, Jr., how to wash and sieve the diamond-bearing rock. This he did, returning on the following Saturday with one small diamond. Mr. Schuller, Jr., continued washing operations for some time, finding a quantity of diamonds. Later on Dr. Molengraal'f visited the spot and confirmed my opinion that a true diamond-bearing pipe had been discovered in the Transvaal. In company with Me Schuller I interviewed the Second Volksraad, then in session in Pretoria, and showed the diamonds to the chairman and members. On Sept. 13, 1897, I read the following paper at a meeting of the Geological Society:

‘I wish to notify the members of this society that a most interesting discovery of a diamondiferous pipe has been made lately in the vicinity of Pretoria. I have the permission of the owners to make public the fact that diamonds have been found in what appears to be a small volcanic pipe, containing minerals closely resembling those in older known diamond mines. Garnets, ‘carbon,’ olivine and other minerals associated with the diamond are there in abundance, and, up to date, eleven diamonds, one weighing 16 carats, and several smaller ones, have been found in washing the blue. The interesting feature regarding this find of diamonds is that it is the first undoubted diamond mine found in the Transvaal, and as it is situated in the quartzites of the Magaliesberg, it is in a geological horizon much older than the Karroo shales of Kimberley, and also than the cave sandstones wherein the Monastery diamond mine is situated. As there is every likelihood of other diamond mines occurring in the neighborhood of the new discovery, I have obtained the owners’ permission to state the above particulars in order to stimulate research in that part of the country."

The statement in the last paragraph has been amply verified, and the discovery of true diamond-bearing pipes of exceptional richness in the Transvaal is now an established fact. The late find at the Premier diamond mine is unprecedented in the history of diamond mining in the world. In other ways the discovery of true diamondbearing pipes in the Transvaal has had far»reaching effects. The old theory that diamonds were derived from the carbon extracted by heat from the carbonaceous shales which surrounded the old craters near Kimberley has been exploded, and the contention which every Kimberley man maintained so stoutly, “that there were no mines outside of the Kimberley and Jagersfontein areas," has been completely dispelled. Kimberley men held that no ‘hardbank’ could exist as a surface rock, and that consequently the Schuller could not possibly be a diamond mine, but they found out that they had a good deal to learn about diamond mines. Most probably neither the largest nor the richest diamond mine has been discovered in South Africa, and the fabulous yield of the Premier should be a stimulant for further research. Great things grow from insignificant beginnings. Du Plooy’s visit to Hurley's store was the first stage in the development of the greatest diamond industry in the world, and Schuller’s interview with myself was the initial step in the diamond industry of the Transvaal.


Source: Engineering and Mining Journal - 1905

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 18, 2014 1:46 pm

BERNHARD & MAYER

Church Street East, Pretoria



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Bernhard & Mayer - Pretoria - 1895

The business of A. Bernhard (b.22-11-1864) was established at least by 1888.

Previously the business of Gottfried Lohner (established 1877?). The business later became Dustin & Co.

A. Bernhard was married to Kathleen Fitzpatrick (b.27-6-1864 Tralee, Co. Kerry, Ireland - d.8-6-1937). A. Bernhard and his wife are both buried in the old Church Street Cemetery, Pretoria.

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 24, 2014 3:43 pm

M.A. ROCHAT

East London

M.A. Rochat was recorded as a Jeweller of East London in 1877.

Source: The Port Elizabeth Directory and Guide to the Eastern Province of the Cape of Good Hope for 1877

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 24, 2014 3:44 pm

W.C. HOWARD

East London

W.C. Howard was recorded as a Jeweller of East London in 1877.

Source: The Port Elizabeth Directory and Guide to the Eastern Province of the Cape of Good Hope for 1877

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 25, 2014 2:38 pm

W. THIMBLEBY

Cross Street, King William's Town


W. Thimbleby was recorded as a Watchmaker of Cross Street, King William's Town in 1877.

Source: The Port Elizabeth Directory and Guide to the Eastern Province of the Cape of Good Hope for 1877

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 25, 2014 2:44 pm

O. PALMER

Queen Street, King William's Town


O. Palmer was recorded as a Jeweller of Queen Street, King William's Town in 1877.

Source: The Port Elizabeth Directory and Guide to the Eastern Province of the Cape of Good Hope for 1877

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 25, 2014 2:56 pm

GREENSLADE BROTHERS

Aliwal North

Greenslade Brothers were recorded as Watchmakers and Jewellers of Aliwal North in 1877.

Source: The Port Elizabeth Directory and Guide to the Eastern Province of the Cape of Good Hope for 1877

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 25, 2014 2:57 pm

JOHN ROLL

Aliwal North

John Roll was recorded as a Watchmaker and Jeweller of Aliwal North in 1877.

Source: The Port Elizabeth Directory and Guide to the Eastern Province of the Cape of Good Hope for 1877

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 29, 2014 2:35 pm

J.S. WILLCOX

Bathurst Street, Graham's Town

J.S. Willcox was recorded as a Jeweller of Bathurst Street, Graham's Town in 1877.

Source: The Port Elizabeth Directory and Guide to the Eastern Province of the Cape of Good Hope for 1877

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 29, 2014 2:38 pm

L. TILDERLEY

High Street, Graham's Town

L. Tilderley was recorded as a Watchmaker of High Street, Graham's Town in 1877.

Source: The Port Elizabeth Directory and Guide to the Eastern Province of the Cape of Good Hope for 1877


Perhaps to be identified with Samuel Tildersly, described as a Goldsmith, who was noted on the Graham's Town Voter's List of 1853, as of Hill Street.

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 29, 2014 2:48 pm

J. HOLMES

Somerset Street, Graham's Town

J.Holmes was recorded as a Watchmaker of Somerset Street, Graham's Town in 1877.

Source: The Port Elizabeth Directory and Guide to the Eastern Province of the Cape of Good Hope for 1877

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 29, 2014 2:50 pm

A. GRIFFITHS

High Street, Graham's Town

A. Griffiths was recorded as a Jeweller of High Street, Graham's Town in 1877.

Source: The Port Elizabeth Directory and Guide to the Eastern Province of the Cape of Good Hope for 1877

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