Some Birmingham Information and Advertisements

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Tue Jul 02, 2013 10:11 am

LUCAS BROTHERS

22, Hylton Street, Birmingham


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Lucas Brothers - Birmingham - 1893


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Lucas Brothers - Birmingham - 1893

Lucas Brothers registered their mark 'LBrsLd' contained within an oblong punch, with the Birmingham Assay Office.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Mon Jul 29, 2013 1:22 pm

CONEY & Co.

75, Stafford Street, 80, Lionel Street, and 56, Howard Street, Birmingham


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Coney & Co. - Birmingham - 1878

Established c.1860 by John Coney.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Tue Jul 30, 2013 5:24 pm

W.J. ANTHONY & SONS Ltd.

St. George's Works, 7, Unett Street, Birmingham


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W.J. Anthony & Sons Ltd. - Birmingham - 1919


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W.J. Anthony & Sons Ltd. - Birmingham - 1919

W.J. Anthony & Sons Ltd. held government contracts for the supply of metal cap badges for the British armed services during WW1.

The business was struck off the Companies Register in August 1949.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 12, 2013 1:27 pm

CHARLES ALLDRIDGE & SON

Regent Parade, Caroline Street, Birmingham


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C. Alldridge & Son - Birmingham - 1862

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 16, 2013 2:15 pm

SHERWOOD & BOURNE

71 & 72, Spencer Street, St. Pauls, Birmingham


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Sherwood & Bourne - Birmingham - 1858


Sherwood & Bourne are recorded as Electro Plated ware manufacturers, located at 71, Spencer Street, Birmingham.
Source: Corporation general and trades directory of Birmingham - 1861

Sherwood & Bourne are recorded as Electro Plate manufacturers, located at 71 & 72, Spencer Street, Birmingham.
Source: The Commercial Directory and Shippers Guide - 1862

Sherwood & Bourne are recorded as 'Manufacturers of every desrciption of plated wares, both on German silver and Britannia metal; also plated on nickel silver, spoons, forks, fish cravers, etc.'
Source: The Handbook to the manufacturers & exporters of Great Britain - 1870

Sherwood & Bourne are recorded as Electro Plate manufacturers, located at 71 & 72, Spencer Street, Birmingham.
Source: The Commercial Directory and Shippers Guide - 1875

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 16, 2013 2:40 pm

SHERWOOD & BARRETT

52, Great Hampton Street, Birmingham

Sherwood and Barrett, manufacturers of silver and electro plated tea and coffee services, egg and cruet frames, dishes, spoons, forks, tureens, tea kettles, waiters, butters, salts, toast racks, drinking cups, and every description of electro plated wares, 52, Great Hampton street

Source: Corporation general and trades directory of Birmingham - 1861

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sat Aug 24, 2013 10:44 am

ARTHUR FENWICK

10, later 16, Augusta Street, later, Athletic Works, 108 Vyse Street, Birmingham


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A. Fenwick - Birmingham - 1891


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A. Fenwick Ltd. - Birmingham - 1960

Established in 1890. Arthur Fenwick was employed by Joseph Moore for twenty-one years (see earlier posts for Allen & Moore, and Joseph Moore).

Arthur Fenwick (Ltd.) entered their marks with the Birmingham and Chester assay offices.

The Chester Assay Office registrations were: Arthur Fenwick 'A·F' contained witin an oblong punch with clipped corners, on the 16th December 1897, and a similar mark entered by Arthur Fenwick Ltd. on the 4th September 1934.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Mon Sep 16, 2013 8:34 am

ALFRED WILCOX

Spencer Street, later, Northampton Street, later, Tenby Street North, later, 84, Vyse Street, later 15, Nursery Road, Birmingham and 23, Ely Place, London.


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Alfred Wilcox - Birmingham - 1915

A noted Registered Design:
Class 2: jewellery. Rd. design No 5150: Registered by Alfred Wilcox, Jeweller, of Northampton Street, Birmingham. Date: 12th April 1884.

The directors in 1915 were Alice Andrews, Alfred Matthew Andrews, and Stanley Andrews. In 1925 they were noted as Alfred Nathan Matthews and Harry Stanley Matthews, and as can be seen below, in 1932 as Alfred Matthew Andrews and Harry Stanley Andrews.

NOTICE is hereby given that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us the undersigned, Alfred Matthew Andrews and Harry Stanley Andrews, carrying on business as Goldsmiths, Manufacturing Jewellers and Silversmiths, at 15, Nursery Road, Hockley, in the city of Birmingham, under the style or firm of ALFRED WILCOX, was dissolved as and from the 31st day of March, 1932, by mutual consent.
All debts due to and owing by the said late firm will be received and paid by the said Harry Stanley Andrews, who will continue the business under the style of Alfred Wilcox as hitherto.–
Dated this 29th day of July, 1932.
A. M. ANDREWS.
H. S. ANDREWS.


Source: The London Gazette - 2nd August 1932

The business registered their marks 'A.W' contained within an oblong punch on the 29th September 1882, and a similar version on the 9th April 1908. 'A.W' contained within a heraldic shield on the 15th September 1925, all with the Chester Assay Office. The dates of Birmingham Assay Office registrations by Alfred Wilcox are not known at the point in time.


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Alfred Wilcox - Birmingham - 1940

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sat Sep 21, 2013 10:24 am

JAMES FENTON

74, Great Hampton Street, Birmingham


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James Fenton - Birmingham - 1863

James Fenton registered his first mark 'J.F' contained within an oblong punch, with the Birmingham Assay Office in 1852. He went on to register further marks with the Birmingham, Sheffield, Chester, and Edinburgh assay offices.


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Birmingham - 1916

Along with Charles Horner, James Swann, and Henry Griffith, James Fenton dominated the silver thimble making industry in Great Britain.


The "Gripper" Thimble, manufactured by Mr. James Fenton, of 74, Great Hampton Street, Birmingham, has now been on its trial for some time, and the points of superiority claimed for it over the ordinary silver thimble of commerce seem to be fully borne out by the testimony of retailers who have stocked it since its introduction into the market. As these claims are duly set forth in the advertisement it is unnecessary to recapitulate them here. Another pretty speciality, manufactured by Mr. Fenton, that is worthy of attention is the " Gipsy" Flower Brooch, advertised. These goods are made in a variety of chaste designs, and the well-established reputation of the firm is a guarantee of the quality of the workmanship.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st July 1889


Fruit knife by James Fenton:

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JF - Birmingham - 1885

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 24, 2013 4:55 am

ARTHUR S. WAINWRIGHT

185, Warstone Lane, Birmingham



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Arthur S. Wainwright - Birmingham - 1909


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Arthur S. Wainwright - Birmingham - 1913


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Arthur S. Wainwright - Birmingham - 1917

An article written by Arthur S. Wainwright regarding the Birmingham Municipal School of Art:

The Birmingham School of Art Committee have, for years past, been keenly alive to the importance of Art School training for many of the young artisans in the city. But it is not easy, in these days of rush and quick returns, to impress this importance upon the young people themselves or upon the general mass of employers. In this country, the effort to overcome the reluctance of the young workers to enter the Continuation Schools leads too frequently to a surrender by the teachers of their higher standards and ideals, and to a tendency to allow their students to do work that, while it may gratify the student's desires, will have little lasting educational value for him. We are at last beginning to realize this in England, but not before it has been forced upon us. Two of the more recent developments at the Central School here are worthy of mention as indicating this awakening. At the request of the Birmingham Master Printers, backed by the workmen's representatives, a school for printers has been established for apprentices and workmen in the printing trade. One of the conditions laid down by the committee demanded compulsory attendance by the apprentices in the daytime, that is, in the master's time and at his expense. Again, after a conference with the members of the Birmingham House-Painters' Association and representatives of the workmen as well, special classes for house-painters were started. Here compulsory attendance during the daytime was likewise conceded, for in a scheme of apprenticeship then being drawn out, the master house-painters made such attendance a condition in the indentures. Both these classes have suffered badly by the depletion of the students through the war ; but they have made a promising start and the committee have high hopes for their future usefulness. The School of Architecture was already firmly established, but has temporarily lapsed owing to the enlistment of the students. Other experiments had been made, notably in classes for brassworkers and for bookbinders. In the case of the brassworkers' classes, there were difficulties in the way of complete success which the committee hopes yet to overcome. It is not easy in such trade classes to fix a standard of excellence that shall obtain the joint approval of the art teachers and of the employers. Pure technical training is not the province of the School of Art and is, moreover, amply provided elsewhere. Nor can a demand to teach a certain style and possibly a bad one at that which may be in vogue in the trade, be always met in a satisfactory manner, especially at a moment's notice and without regard to the proper training in general principles of art and design.

But in quite another way the Birmingham Central School endeavours to meet the demand for trained draughtsmen and designers which right or wrong, unquestionably exists to a considerable degree in the city. Largely through the generosity of Alderman William Kenrick, until lately Chairman of the Committee, a number of scholarships, tenable for three years, have been instituted. These are granted, so many every year, to selected candidates from the free admissioners, of whom a considerable number are drafted into the school from the elementary schools at the leaving age, 14 years. The system whereby the drawing in all the elementary schools is regularly supervised by highly qualified members of the School of Art staff, ensures that these free admissioners represent largely the best available talent in the city. The total number of scholarship holders at one given time is about fifty. They are held chiefly, though not entirely, by boys who are required to attend at the school all day. Evening work is optional. They are under the immediate supervision of the Director, Mr. Catterson Smith. Readers of THE STUDIO will doubtless be familiar with the methods of memory-drawing, etc., which have produced such excellent results in this school, since Mr. Catterson Smith has recently explained them himself in its pages (vol. Iv). These" Kenrick Scholars," as they are called, have the full advantage of this teaching and are the best possible witnesses to its value. The examples produced in THE STUDIO were the work of these free admissioners and " Kenrick Scholars."

Nature and memory-drawing are, of course, only a part of the training. Modelling and design are included, all under the direct supervision of the Director, and metal-work is taught under highly qualified teachers. The students learn, among other things, to make quick display drawings, such as they would be required to make in a draughtsman's office. The demand for such draughtsmen is quite a large one. The knowledge of actual craftsmanship acquired at the school is sufficient to check mere fancifulness in design and thus avoid the pitfall of impracticability. The object of all the training is to produce not only quick, but highly intelligent draughtsmen, sensitive and impressionable, with their fancy alive, not atrophied by too much copying of mechanical convention just at the age when the effect of such convention would be most deadly, and so to equip them that they will be useful in any branch of art manufacture to which they may gravitate. The fact that the scholars are placed in situations as soon as they are ready to leave the school, most of them as a result of direct application from employers, proves that the training is appreciated in the city.

Both at the Central School, and at the more important branch schools, other classes are arranged to suit the requirements of various local trades, but space does not permit of detailed description here. One may mention lettering especially, and of course book-illustration which is of a more general nature, and a branch of industry to which the Central School is giving a good deal of attention and showing promising results. Of course, the school cannot undertake to produce genius, that is always on the lap of the gods. But that it is producing capable young artists adaptable to the needs of the city is beyond question. It is, however, to be desired that the value of such training may be more appreciated so that a better remuneration may be offered to these young artists than has been too generally the case, not only in Birmingham but elsewhere. Unfortunately too little value has been attached to the place of the creative designer in England for many years. We have been too content to seek our inspiration abroad.

At the School for Jewellers and Silversmiths at Vittoria Street, of which Mr. Arthur J. Gaskin is head master, the problem is a simpler one. Here is a school designed to meet the direct requirements of a definite trade. The control of the school is in the hands of a joint committee, half of the members being nominated by the School of Art Committee and half by the Jewellers' Association from the trade. As far as can be the requirements of the industry are met, not only from the art side, but also from the technical side, and the school is equipped in a most up-to-date manner to meet the more technical needs, the die-sinking and tool-making rooms, for example, containing all necessary machinery for their requirements. The school caters not only for the young people engaged in the trade, but for the older workmen and foremen, where specific instruction is wanted. As an example of this, when war broke out a big demand for enamelled badges arose, and there was a scarcity of enamellers in the trade for the volume of the business afoot. Quite a number of workmen came to the school for special instruction in enamelling, and the school was most useful in aiding these men to cope with the position. Prior to the outbreak of the war, well over 600 students were enrolled on the books of the school, and even during the first year of its continuance the numbers were about 500. These figures show its great importance to the industry generally. During the past year the attendance has suffered more through the enlistment of a large number of the senior students.

One special departure of the committee should be mentioned here. Some years ago it obtained permission to establish a Manual Training Centre at Vittoria Street, in connexion with the elementary schools in the district, so that boys between the ages of twelve and fourteen who intended to enter the trade later on might have a preliminary training there during their schooldays, instead of the usual manual training offered in the elementary schools. It was recognized that the general educational value would be great and the request was granted. The success of the experiment was very gratifying, and the lads made such progress that permission was obtained not only to increase the number of boys so attending to the present figure seventy, but also to have them for two sessions a week instead of one, as is the rule in other manual training centres. These boys are gladly taken by employers as soon as they leave the elementary school, and at a higher commencing wage than untrained boys; and, moreover, the committee has been able to persuade the employers to allow them to still attend at Vittoria Street in the daytime, that is to say, of course, in the masters' time. This point of day attendance is one about which the committee feels very strongly. It is not fair to expect good work to be done at night by growing lads and girls, and especially after a hard day's work in the factory.

In these manual training classes the boys are taught drawing as a matter of course, and the same methods that have produced such satisfactory results at the Central School are used here, as they are generally in the city. But, from the commencement, the scholars are taught to use the tools they will want in the trade. Exercises in design are coupled with actual handicraft. For example, they will be required to arrange a given unit, or perhaps several given units, repeated at will, into as decorative a design as possible. Then they must solder these units neatly and soundly together into a finished ornamental whole. Or, as an exercise in saw-piercing, the boy is permitted to pierce his own design in the metal, and afterwards may make the pierced metal up into some simple article, such as a serviette ring or paper-knife, and so test the suitability of his design for such purpose.

The time allowed for these manual training classes is, of course, too short to allow more than elementary groundwork to be covered, and the more important training must come after the boy enters the trade. But all the teaching, from the manual training classes right up through all departments of the school, is designed to meet the legitimate wants of the trade and to produce good workmen. The school would, however, fail in its mission if it did not aim at something more than merely training good workmen. Its mission is to make them intelligent and sympathetic, with their imagination stimulated, and alive to the possibilities of high aspiration in the future.

ARTHUR S. WAINWRIGHT


Source: Arts & crafts - A Review of the Work Executed by Students in the Leading Art Schools of Great Britain and Ireland - Edited by Charles Holme - 1916

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sat Oct 05, 2013 1:55 pm

W.E. TEDD & Co.

Electro Works, 45 & 46, Kenyon Street, Birmingham


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W.E. Tedd & Co. - Birmingham - 1902

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sat Oct 12, 2013 9:36 am

ALICE MABEL CAMWELL

Birmingham


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Alice Mabel Camwell - Birmingham - 1929 and 1935

Alice Mabel Camwell was recorded in the 1911 census as aged 30, born at Staffordshire in 1881. Her occupation was recorded as Enameller Jeweller.


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Alice Mabel Camwell - 1909

Alice Camwell was first noted as exhibiting at the Royal Society of Artists Birmingham Arts and Crafts Exhibition in 1909, and as receiving a mention at The National Competition of Schools of Art in 1909, at the time she was attending the School of Art, Margaret Street, Birmingham. She received another mention at the same competition in 1911. She was also a teacher of metalwork and jewellery and her work has been noted up to 1935.


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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sun Oct 20, 2013 8:04 am

SMITH & PEPPER

77 & 78, Vyse Street, Birmingham


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Smith & Pepper - Birmingham - c.1915

The firm of Smith & Pepper was established by Charles Smith (1867-1933) and his uncle Edwin Pepper (1858-1935) in 1899.

The business entered its mark 'S&P' mark with the Birmingham Assay Office on the 5th September 1899.


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Smith & Pepper - Birmingham - 1963

They entered a similar mark with the Chester Assay Office on the 20th January 1954, along with another with the 'S' and the 'P' in square punches, on the 29th April 1954. On the 23rd April 1954 they entered an incuse 'S & P' with the Chester Assay Office.

Smith & Pepper finally closed their doors in 1981, their premises at Vyse Street were left untouched, complete in almost every detail and frozen in time when they locked the doors and left for the last time. The factory and buildings were later acquired by Birmingham City Council's Museums and Art Galleries Department and this time capsule is now converted into the Museum of the Jewellery Quarter.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 22, 2013 9:41 am

I.S. GREENBERG & Co.

32, Vyse Street, and 44, Frederick Street, and 126, Great Hampton Street, Birmingham


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I.S. Greenberg & Co. - Birmingham - 1891

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I.S. Greenberg & Co. - Birmingham - 1903

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I.S. Greenberg & Co. - Birmingham - 1903


The business of Israel Sigmund Greenberg.

The mark of I.S. Greenberg & Co. used on their plated wares:

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See: http://www.925-1000.com/silverplate_G2.html

I.S. Greenberg & Co. entered a large variety of marks with the Birmingham, London, and Chester assay offices.

See: http://www.925-1000.com/dlBirmingham3.html

The business was converted into a limited liability company on the 26th May 1909, styled I.S. Greenberg & Co.Ltd., with Israel Sigmund Greenberg as the sole director.

Israel Sigmund Greenberg was also, along with Ellis Jacob Greenberg and Herbert Simeon Greenberg, the partners in the business of the Silversmiths and Electro platers, Ellis & Co., of 15½, Great Hampton Street, Birmingham, prior to their merger with Barker Brothers.


ISRAEL SIGMUND GREENBERG, Deceased.
Pursuant to 15 Geo. V., c. 19
All persons having claims against the estate of Israel Sigmund Greenberg, deceased, late of No. 6, Rotton Park Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham (who died on the 18th October, 1926 and whose will was proved in the Birmingham District Registry of the Probate Division of His Majesty's High Court of Justice on the 16th December, 1926, by Harold Arthur Sharp, Sydney Philip Blanckensee and Ellis Jacob Greenberg, the executors therein named), are required to send particulars, in writing, of their claims and demands to us, the undersigned, Solicitors for the said executors, on or before the 10th day of April 1927, after which date the said executors will proceed to distribute the assets of the said deceased amongst the persons entitled thereto, haying regard only to the claims and demands of which they shall then have had notice .
Dated this 2nd day of February, 1927

ARNOLD, SON & ROSE, 3, Waterloo street, Birmingham, Solicitors for the said Executors.


Source: The London Gazette - 4th February 1927

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Wed Oct 23, 2013 4:46 am

J. FAWSON

57a, Northampton Street, Birmingham


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J. Fawson - Birmingham - 1892

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Thu Oct 24, 2013 10:03 am

JOHN COLLYER & Co.Ltd.

50, later, 133, Hockley Hill, Birmingham


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John Collyer & Co.Ltd. - Birmingham - 1920

See: http://www.925-1000.com/silverplate_C2.html

John Collyer & Co.Ltd. entered their mark 'J.C & Co.Ld' contained within an oblong punch, with the Birmingham Assay Office in July 1900.

John Collyer & Co.Ltd. entered their mark 'J.C & Co Ld' contained within an oblong punch, with the Chester Assay Office on the 30th August 1904.

C.B. Barnett was noted as Secretary and Director in 1904, his private address being recorded as 'Trelyn', Sutton Coldfield.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Fri Oct 25, 2013 2:18 pm

COLLINGWOOD & SON Ltd.

Corner of Corporation and Linthorpe Roads, Middlesbrough, and Stockton, Darlington & Hartlepool


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Collingwood & Son Ltd. - Birmingham - 1936


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Collingwood & Son Ltd. - Birmingham - 1938

The business of Collingwood & Son traces its history back to the Clockmaker, Matthew Collingwood who was christened in Alnwick on April 10, 1796. Matthew married Mary Cramer on the 28th November 1819, at Alnwick and the couple had nine children, all born in Alnwick between 1821 and 1840. Two of Matthew’s sons, John (b.1822) and Matthew George (b.1827) were also noted as Watchmakers and Jewellers, as was a grandson, Horatio Nelson Collingwood.

It was Matthew George Collingwood that established the business at Middlesbrough in c.1886. The firm is thought to have continued in business until the 1960's.

Matthew George Collingwood was noted as Deputy Mayor of Middlesbrough in 1890.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sat Oct 26, 2013 10:00 am

COLLINGWOOD & SON Ltd. (Additional information)

An earlier address of the business was 5, Cleveland Terrace, Middlesbrough (1880).

The business was under sole ownership of Horatio Nelson Collingwood by 1896.

Collingwood & Son had additional branches at Newcastle (21, New Bridge Street, Newcastle-upon-Tyne), noted in 1899, and at Sunderland, noted in 1909.

The Hartlepool address in 1899 was recorded as 25, Church Street, West Hartlepool.

The firm were converted into a limited liability company on the 17th November 1909.

As Matthew George Collingwood & Son, they entered a mark 'MGC & S' contained within an oblong punch, with the London Assay Office on the 20th February 1899.

Collingwood & Son also used the services of the Chester Assay Office. Their first mark 'C & S' contained witin an oblong punch will clipped corners, was entered on the 25th April 1896. Their second mark 'MGC & S' contained within an oblong punch, was entered on the 25th February 1899, and a third mark 'M.G.C & S' contained within an oblong punch with a diamond shaped centre, on the 21st January 1902.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sat Oct 26, 2013 2:14 pm

RAENO SILVER PLATE Co.Ltd.

240-6 Camden Street, Birmingham


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R.S.P.Co. - Birmingham - 1917

The Raeno Silver Plate Co.Ltd. registered their mark with the Birmingham Assay Office in February 1913. They were noted as exhibitors at the British Industries Fair of 1922.

See: http://www.925-1000.com/dlBirmingham5.html

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 03, 2013 4:24 am

EZRA TERRY

57, Mott Street, St. George's, Birmingham


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Ezra Terry - Birmingham - 1861

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