Some Birmingham Information and Advertisements

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 15, 2013 3:32 pm

MALIN & SONS

16, Little Charles Street, Birmingham

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Malin and Sons - Birmingham - 1840

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 18, 2013 2:51 pm

J. HUDSON & Co.

The Metropolitan Whistle Works, 131, later 11-13, later still, 244, Barr Street, Birmingham

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J. Hudson & Co. - Birmingham - 1885

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J. Hudson & Co. - Birmingham - 1897

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J. Hudson & Co. - Birmingham - 1901

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J. Hudson & Co. - Birmingham - 1908

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J. Hudson & Co. - Birmingham - 1922

J. Hudson & Co. was established in the 1870's by Joseph Hudson (b.1848—d.1930) and his brother James Hudson (b.1850—d.1888). The company are still in business today, now styled Acme Whistles.

They were located at the following addresses: 84, Buckingham Street: 1883-1884, 131, Barr Street: 1885-1888, 11/13, Barr Street: 1888-1909, and 244, Barr Street : 1909-Present.

J. Hudson & Co. entered their mark, 'J.H & Co' contained within a three part oblong punch with clipped corners, with the Birmingham Assay Office in August 1899.

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J.H & Co

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 23, 2013 2:33 pm

SAMUEL M. LEVI

16, Frederick Street & 67-69, Vyse Street, Birmingham

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Samuel M. Levi - Birmingham - 1892


An example of the work and mark of Samuel M. Levi:

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Rd 495330

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S.M.L - Birmingham - 1909

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S.M.L - Birmingham - 1909

The business of Samuel M. and Charles M. Levi. They entered their marks 'S.M.L' contained within an oblong punch, with the Birmingham and Chester assay offices in the late 19th/early 20th century. The firm later entered a 'SML Ltd' contained within an oblong punch, with the BAO, reflecting their conversion to a limited liability company.

Noted as exhibitors at the British Industries Fairs of 1922 and 1929.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 24, 2013 2:30 pm

DUTCHESS OF SUTHERLAND's CRIPPLES GUILD OF HANDICRAFTS

Wilson Street, Hanley, Staffordshire


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The Duchess of Sutherland's Cripples Guild of Handicrafts was founded in 1898 by Millicent, the 4th Duchess of Sutherland. Originally styled as The Potteries and Newcastle Cripples' Guild; the British Medical Journal in 1901 described the object of the guild as "to help crippled children to obtain proper surgical treatment and appliances, and to see that they get some education." Metalworking was started by the Guild in 1902 producing hand made items in silver, silver plate, bronze and mixed metals.


A DUCAL PALACE FOR THE "CRIPPLES' GUILD"

A PALACE TO BE TURNED INTO A FACTORY

(By CHARLES BYNG-HALL, in the New Orleans "Times-Democrat.")

Trentham Hall, the famous seat in Staffordshire of the Duke and Duchess of Sutherland, is undergoing conversion into a factory for crippled workers. Built from the designs of Barry at a cost of £150,000 in the days when labour and material cost less than half what they do now, its walls adorned with a wealth of pictures by the old masters, rich in statuary, enclosed by beautiful gardens and conservatories, set in the midst of a magnificent park, Trentham Hall has been for generations one of the first of England's show places. Now, a wondrous transformation is to take place in it. The halls in which monarchs have, been entertained will soon resound with the din of industry. The rooms in which the titled favourites of fortune were wont to gather will be filled with the victims of misfortune from their birth, engaged in overcoming life's handicap by the arts of cunning craftsmanship. It is like a fairy tale made real – a Socialist dream realised. It is all part and parcel of a scheme by which the Duchess of Sutherland's pet charity, the Cripples' Guild, has been turned into a public company, which will pay dividends to its shareholders while providing a generous surplus for the disabled workers. It is a recognition of the principle that the philanthropy that saves is the philanthropy that pays. The duchess will continue to be the presiding genius of the whole business. The Duke and Duchess of Sutherland have many interests in that section of England known as " The Potteries." This comprises the counties of Staffordshire and Worcestershire, but the first named is the very centre, not alone of the district, but of the interests of the Sutherlands. They have estates there, they take some of their titles from there. For the past decade the duchess has been the " Lady Bountiful " to the poor of the pottery country. For ' seven years she has especially looked after the crippled children, many of whom are now grown up. These cripples she gathered into a guild. Workshops were established in which the cripples were taught various trades, so that they might succeed in earning their own living. The guild was supported almost exclusively by the duchess. Of late the guild has grown so large that it was almost impossible for the duchess to devote the time necessary to properly conduct its affairs. In the town of Hanley, in Staffordshire, the guild has a great factory in which some 340 cripples of both sexes are daily employed. There is a staff of instructors and a business staff. But the duchess, as the president, had to personally look after all the business. The demand for the good's Manufactured by the cripples was so great that the duchess was soon adrift on the deep, and to her unknown, waters of the trade world. The duchess is a great social leader. She is also successful in many other roles. But she is not a business woman. Her little home charity had grown to be quite an industry. It was crushing her. Her social and public duties are many. Her ignorance of business matters brought the affairs of the guild into a hopeless tangle. Apparently as a working concern it was paying big profits. Yet it was a continual drag on the duchess's purse. Both demands on time and money kept increasing, and the duchess was on the verge of despair when on the Riviera she met England's greatest hustler, C. Arthur Pearson, the editor and owner of the " Daily Express " and a large number of other British dailies and publications.

MR PEARSON IN CHARGE - The duchess and Mr Pearson are old friends. To him as a business man she confided her troubles. Mr Pearson was interested: One of the greatest charities in England, the children's fresh air fund, is his. The duchess promised her aid socially for his charity if he would give his aid professionally as a business man to hers The deal was made, and Mr Pearson took hold of the Cripples' Guild. He visited the potteries and saw the work, went into the fullest details with the staff as well as with the crippled workers themselves, and when he reported to the duchess he declared that the only way out of the difficulty was to make the guild a regular business concern. And so was entrusted to Mr Pearson the work of converting a charity into a public company. The name was changed from the Potteries Guild of Handicrafts to the Duchess of Sutherland's Cripples' Guild, Limited. The capital was placed at £5000 in 4900 ordinary shares and 100 deferred shares of £1 each. The ordinary shares will receive a fixed dividend of 3½ per cent per annum and the deferred shareholders will receive the remainder of the profits. The deferred shareholders have agreed to apply such profits to the training school and the charitable work of the guild. As experts who have looked into the matter have figured it out that, run as a business concern, the profits of the guild should be fully 20 per cent, there promises to be a handsome surplus for the charitable branch of the undertaking. The directors of the company are the Duchess of Sutherland, chairman: C. Arthur Pearson, S. J. Waring and J. F. Campbell. Mr Waring is head of the important firm of Warings, Limited, and also Waring and Gillow. These firms have, immense stores in London and elsewhere devoted to house furnishing and hardware generally. Mr Waring is also a partner of Mr Selfridge, of Chicago, in the coming huge department store which is soon to startle England. Mr Campbell is head of the celebrated chinaware firm of Minton's. The capital of the company was all subscribed within a few minutes. With such a unique company and a duchess as chairman, a hundred times the amount wanted oould have been secured.

A PALACE RENT-FREE. To further ensure the success of the scheme the Duke of Sutherland transferred Trentham Hall and the magnificent estate surrounding it to the company free of rent. It detracts nothing from the munificence of the gift that Trentham Hall has been for the last three years abandoned as a ducal residence because of the pollution of the River Trent, which runs through the grounds, by the many factories on its banks. The duke went to law over the contamination of the river and was beaten. Still it was open to him to sell the property for manufacturing purposes, and it would have brought him in a lot of money. But he has preferred to take the more generous course. And so it comes about that it is to be turned into a factory for crippled workers. One of the apartments has been especially fitted up for the exclusive use of the duchess in her capacity as chairman of company. The beauties of Trentham have been immortalised in Lord Beaconsfield's novel, " Lothair," where, under the name of Brentham, it is described as " an Italian palace of freestone, vast, ornate and in scrupulous condition."While the Duke of Sutherland used Trentham Hall as a private residence, the busy workers from the districts round were always welcome to visit its fine park, and this was indeed a boon to the dwellers in the smoke and grime of the potteries, for the park and grounds are particularly fine. The late Duke of Devonshire once said that, in his opinion, the garden front of Trentham was absolutely unrivalled even, by his own famous Chatsworth.
Perhaps the most glorious feature of the grounds is the lake, which is almost a mile long, with woody islands here and there. Away on one side rise, the hills, and on the other is a stretch of green fields, while above the lake are the terraced gardens.

TRENTHAM HALL ASSOCIATIONS. There are innumerable interesting events connected with Trentham Hall, too. On more than one occasion the toilers in the smoke-begrimed district lying so near have risen in revolt against those who dwelt in easy luxury away from the toil and dirt, and once, during the pottery bread riots the residents of Trentham Hall had to secure the services of armed retainers to defend them against the mob. Mementoes of this perilous time in the shape of guns and swords used by the little regiment are still to be seen in the steward's room. Such a state of things form a striking contrast to the changed conditions under which Trentham Hall continues its lease of life. The duke is the largest land-owner in England. His property is over 1,300,000 acres in extent. How came the Dukes of Sutherland to possess such vast estates? A century and a half ago they were simple Yorkshire squires. Now the family of which the duke is the head possesses five baronies, four viscounties, five earldoms and a mairquisate, and lands almost beyond enumeration. The secret of their luck is that they have always had an unrivalled aptitude for marrying heiresses. Three great marriages in bygone days set the family more than on its feet; made them master of wealth beyond the dreams of avarice, and land and houses stored with literary and art treasures. The duke is a heavily bearded man of middle age. He looks like a pirate, but is one of the best-natured men In the world. The duchess is accounted one of the loveliest women in England. She has written books and plays. She is not such a pronounced Socialist as her half-sister, the Countess of Warwick, but for a peeress she is decidedly democratic. To cure her two sons of a tendency to snobbishness she once took them away from a fashionable institution of learning and sent them to a parish school, where they mingled with peasant children. She lives for several months of the year in Scotland, where the biggest portion of the duke's estates is situated and has done notable work in developing the crofter homespun tweed industry.

WORK OF MISS MACMILLAN. It was Miss Margaret Macmillan, a Socialist, who first turned the attention of the duchess to the need of practical work among the potteries. The duchess attended one of her lectures. Without revealing her identity she afterwards had a long talk with Miss Macmillan. That was the beginning of the warm friendship which has continued to the present day. Soon after their meeting a large party of crippled children were invited to Trentham Hall for a picnic. There and then a guild was formed. The first venture was in artificial flower-making, following the ideas of France. The duchess secured a teacher from France, who visited in turn the homes of the crippled children and instructed them. Soon afterwards a room was hired and here the work began to grow. In two years time the industry was so big that a building in the centre of the district, in the town of Hanley, was leased, and other handicrafts were taken up. At the Providence Works in Wilson Street, Hanley, to-day there are cripples of both sexes who are skilled as enamellers, jewellers, printers, bookbinders, die stampers and metal workers. The artificial flower-making, however, has been abandoned. The work of the girls was excellent, but the markets of Britain have lately been swamped with artificial flowers made in Germany and France, and that, combined with the lack of capital, necessitated a cessation of that work. Men and women instructors have charge of the various departments, which are all thoroughly equipped with the best class tools and the highest grade machinery. At the various benches sit the crippled children of all ages up to man and womanhood. They work the regulation hours of their trade, except for such time as is devoted to lectures and instruction. All the materials are supplied, and while some work from patterns, the more gifted among the cripples execute original designs. The recreation consists of games, of reading aloud by one of the staff, or of music. All the meals are supplied the workers in addition to pay by piecework. The pay is at union rates, and many of the cripples are such skilled and fast workers that they make very good wages, quite as much, in fact, as if they were able-bodied men and women fighting for place amid the turmoil of the outside world.

THE FACTORY BUILDING. Here in this big, comfortable and clean factory building the 300 odd cripples resemble one big family, although the working rules and regulations are strict and absolutely business-like. The whole output of the factory to date has been bought up without " drummers " or without advertising. But now, under Mr Pearson's management, the output is to be increased. The guild will employ several thousand cripples instead or a bare 300. Trentham Hall, being an immense pile of buildings, will accommodate a small army. And following this increase in workers and, consequently, in output will come advertising of the goods and perhaps a commercial traveller on the road. Already Warings, Limited, have made a contract to take all the metal work of the useful order for their big hardware stores. And already have some of the swellest stores in swell Bond Street given large orders for enamelling and jewellery work.


Source: The Star - 11th January 1908

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M.S

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D.S.C.G

The Guild entered their mark 'M.S' (Millicent Sutherland) contained within two conjoined circles, with the Birmingham Assay Office.

Metalwork produced by the Guild is also stamped with the mark 'D.S.C.G' (Duchess of Sutherland's Cripples Guild) under a Ducal crown.

Thanks to Miles for the great images.

Trev.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby MCB » Thu Apr 25, 2013 6:30 am

Duchess of Sutherland's Cripples Guild

Various websites have provided the following information:
The Duchess was born Lady Millicent Fanny St Clair-Erskine in 1867, daughter of the 4th Earl of Rosslyn. Aged 17 years in 1884 she married Lord Cromatie Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, Marquess of Stafford. He became the Duke of Sutherland in 1892 and died in 1913. She died in France in 1955.
Trentham Hall was demolished in 1912.
The guild's London address was 13-14 Bond Street.
On becoming a limited company in 1907 the guild changed name to Duchess of Sutherland’s Cripples Guild of Handicrafts.
The metal works closed in 1922.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 26, 2013 4:51 am

ALBURY BROTHERS Ltd.

Century Buildings, 35, Summerhill Road, Birmingham

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Albury Bros. Ltd. - Birmingham - 1960

Established in 1886 and thought to be still in business today.

Albury Brothers entered their marks 'A·BROS' contained within an oblong punch in March 1917, 'A.BROS' incuse and without outline in November 1921, and 'A.BROS' contained within an oblong punch in June 1950, all with the Birmingham Assay Office.

The firm also entered three marks, all being 'A.BROS' incuse, on the 9th April 1940, 6th January 1950, and 24th June 1954, with the Chester Assay Office. The names registered with the Chester Assay Office were Judah and Albert Albury trading as Albury Brothers.

Albury Brothers were known to manufacture jewellery in gold, silver, rolled gold, and gold plated silver. They used the trade name 'ORELLA'.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 30, 2013 8:17 am

A.W. CROSBEE & Co., later, A.W. CROSBEE & SONS Ltd.

7, Vyse Street, Birmingham

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A.W. Crosbee & Sons Ltd. - Birmingham - 1932

Arthur Walter Crosbee trading as A.W. Crosbee & Co., later, A.W. Crosbee & Sons Ltd. entered their marks with the Birmingham and Chester assay offices.

The firms name was restyled from A.W. Crosbee & Co., to, A.W. Crosbee & Sons Ltd. sometime between 1911 and 1926.

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A.W.C & S.Ltd

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A.W. Crosbee & Sons Ltd. - Birmingham - 1932

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A.W. Crosbee & Sons Ltd. - Birmingham - 1949

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Fri May 03, 2013 4:22 am

J.H. STARLING

7, and 44, Augusta Street, Birmingham

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J.H. Starling - Birmingham - 1891

J.H. Starling opened his premises a 7, Augusta Street, in 1891.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Thu May 09, 2013 11:48 am

A.H. DARBY & SON

51 Caroline Street, later, 14, Regent Parade, Birmingham

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A.H. Darby & Son - Birmingham - 1949

The business of Alfred Horatio Darby was founded in 1860. The firm is believed to have restyled to A.H. Darby and Son around 1941.

Alfred Horatio Darby entered his marks 'AHD' and 'A.H.D' contained within an oblong punch, with the Birmingham Assay Office.
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Another mark 'A.H.D & S' incuse has been noted with 1944 and 1946 BAO dates.

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A.H.D&S - Birmingham - 1946


They also entered their mark 'A.H.D.' contained within an oblong punch, with the Chester Assay Office on the 30th April 1895.

The firm are thought to have been in business until the early 1960's.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Thu May 09, 2013 12:20 pm

W.H. DARBY & SONS

Birmingham


Examples of the work and marks of W.H. Darby & Sons:

Nunnery spoons

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WHD - Birmingham - 1958

W.H. Darby & Sons entered two marks 'W.H.D' contained within a shield, and 'W.H.D' incuse, with the Birmingham Assay Office in June 1955.

W.H. Darby & Sons appear to have acquired some of Alexander Ritchie's IONA moulds and reproduced later examples of his work, as can be seen below with this example assayed at Birmingham in 1956, some fifteen years after Ritchie's death in 1941:

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W.H. Darby & Sons are still in business today, now styled W.H. Darby Ltd. and are now located at 16, Well Street, Birmingham. They claim establishment in 1886, and now appear to be associated with Vaughtons.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Fri May 10, 2013 6:24 am

JOHN SATCHWELL & Co.Ltd.

1, Station Street, Birmingham

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John Satchwell & Co.Ltd. - Birmingham - 1932

John Satchwell & Co.Ltd entered their mark 'JS&Co' contained within a losenge shaped punch, with the Birmingham Assay Office.

John Satchwell & Co.Ltd entered their mark 'JS&Co' contained within a losenge shaped punch, with the Chester Assay Office on the 16th July 1902.

John Satchwell & Co.Ltd were later acquired by Pinder Brothers of Sheffield.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sun May 12, 2013 8:02 am

DONALD COLLINS

53, Great Hampton Street, Hockley, Birmingham

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Donald Collins - Birmingham - 1949

Frederick Joseph Collins and Donald Reginald Collins trading as Donald Collins entered their mark 'DC' contained within two conjoined circles, with the Chester Assay Office on the 26th February 1946.

The firm entered their mark 'DC' contained within a heraldic shield, with the Birmingham Assay Office in May 1960.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Mon May 13, 2013 4:07 am

HENRY WILLIAM ASHFORD

27-28, Snape Street, later, 40, Frederick Street, Birmingham

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Henry Wm. Ashford - Birmingham - 1863

Henry William Ashford, the son of John Ashford and Mary Diana Brook, was born at Birmingham on 15th August 1829. He married Charlotte Shirley. He died on the 24th November 1913 at Upton-upon-Severn, Worcestershire, and is buried at Great Malvern Cemetery, Great Malvern, Worcestershire.

Henry William Ashford entered his mark 'W·H·A' contained within an oblong punch, at the Chester Assay Office on the 1st November 1900 from the address of 40, Frederick Street, Birmingham. The Chester Assay Office registers describe him as a Gold Chain Manufacturer.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby MCB » Tue May 14, 2013 8:30 am

HENRY WILLIAM ASHFORD

Although he entered a mark at Chester AO in 1900 the 1901 UK Census shows he was already retired as a jeweller and living in Malvern; similarly the 1911 UK Census.
The extract of probate of his Will, proved at the London Registry on 23rd December 1912, shows his death as 24th November 1912. His estate was valued at £33323+.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sat May 18, 2013 2:28 pm

EDWIN JOSEPH HOULSTON

11, Caroline Street, Birmingham

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Edwin Joseph Houlston Ltd. - Birmingham - 1949

The firm claim establishment in the 1830's

E.J. Houlston at one time specialised in the mounting of silver additions to pottery.

The firm used the name 'CAROLINE' for their silverplated wares.

E.J. Houlston entered their mark 'EJH' contained in three conjoined circles, with the Birmingham Assay Office in January 1903 and April 1945.


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EJH - Birmingham - 1915



Examples of the work of Edwin Joseph Houlston Ltd.:

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EJH - Birmingham - 1943



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EJH - Birmingham - 1945

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sat May 25, 2013 11:39 am

T. & H. CRATHORNE Ltd.

51-52, later, 46, Newhall Hill, Birmingham

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T.&.H. Crathorne Ltd. - Birmingham - 1946

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T.&.H. Crathorne Ltd. - Birmingham - 1961

T.& H. Crathorne Ltd. used the trade name 'FAIRBORN'.

T.& H. Crathorne Ltd.entered their marks 'T&H.C' contained within an oblong punch, in January 1912. 'T&H.C' incuse without outline, in October 1919. 'T&HC' incuse without outline, in November 1919. 'T&HC' incuse without outline, in May 1960. 'T.&H.C' contained within an oblong punch with clipped corners, in March 1961, with the Birmingham Assay Office.

T.& H. Crathorne Ltd.entered their mark 'T&H.C' incuse without outline, on the 6th July 1942 with the Chester Assay Office.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 04, 2013 6:36 am

THOMAS HOPWOOD

25-27, Branston Street, Birmingham

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Thomas Hopwood - Birmingham - 1917

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Thomas Hopwood - Birmingham - 1932

Established 1852.

The business appears to have got into financial trouble in 1925:

HOPWOOD, Thomas William, and HOPWOOD, Frank Sebastian, both residing at Shustoke House, Shustoke, and carrying on business in partnership under the style of THOMAS HOPWOOD, at 25-27, Branston-street, in the city of Birmingham. IMITATION JEWELLERY MANUFACTURERS.
Court–BIRMINGHAM.
No. of Matter–67 of 1925.
Date of Order–Aug. 13, 1925.
Date of Filing Petition–Aug. 13, 1925.


Source: The London Gazette - 18th August 1925

HOPWOOD, Thomas William, and HOPWOOD, Frank Sebastian, both residing at Shustoke House, Shustoke. and carrying on business in partnership under the style of THOMAS HOPWOOD, at 25-27, Branston-street, in the city of Birmingham. IMITATION JEWELLERY MANUFACTURERS.
Court - BIRMINGHAM.
No. of Matter–67 of 1925.
Date of First Meeting–Aug. 28, 1925. 11 a.m.
Place–Official Receiver's Office, Ruskin Chambers, 191, Corporation-street, Birmingham.
Date of Public Examination–Oct. 7, 1925. 2.30 p.m.
Place–Court House, Corporation-street, Birmingham.


Source: The London Gazette - 21st August 1925

HOPWOOD, Thomas William, and HOPWOOD, Frank Sebastian, lately residing at Shustoke House, Shustoke, and carrying on business in partnership under the style of THOMAS HOPWOOD, at 25-27, Branston-street, in the city of Birmingham. IMITATION JEWELLERY MANUFACTURERS.
Court–BIRMINGHAM.
No. of Matter–67 of 1925.
Last Day for Receiving Proofs–Nov. 1, 1926.
Name of Trustee and Address–Bardell, Arthur Percy, 27, Frederick-street, Birmingham.


Source: The London Gazette - 15th October 1926

HOPWOOD, Thomas William, and HOPWOOD, Frank Sebastian, both residing at Shustoke House, Shustoke, and carrying on business in partnership under the style of " THOMAS HOPWOOD," at 25-27, Branston-street, in the city of Birmingham. IMITATION JEWELLERY MANUFACTURERS.
Court–BIRMINGHAM.
No. of Matter–67 of 1925.
Amount per £–0¼d.
First or Final, or otherwise–First and Final.
When Payable–Dec. 14, 1926.
Where Payable–27, Frederick-street, Birmingham


Source: The London Gazette - 3rd December 1926

In the County Court of Warwickshire, holden at Birmingham.–In Bankruptcy. No. 67 of 1926.
Re THOMAS WILLIAM' HOPWOOD and FRANK SEBASTIAN HOPWOOD, both residing at Shustoke House, Shustoke, and carrying on business in partnership under the style of THOMAS HOPWOOD, at 25-27, Branstonstreet, in the city of Birmingham, Imitation Jewellery Manufacturers.
NOTICE is hereby given, that there being in the hands of the trustee in the above bankruptcy a surplus estimated at £2 12s. arising from the separate estate of Frank Sebastian Hopwood, one of the bankrupts, and there being no separate creditors of such bankrupt, it is the intention of such trustee, at the expiration of twenty-one days from the appearance of this notice in the Gazette, to transfer such surplus to the credit of the joint estate in the said bankruptcy.–Dated this 22nd day of December, 1926.
A. PERCY BARDELL, Trustee.

Source: The London Gazette - 28th December 1926

HOPWOOD, Frank Sebastian (Separate Estate), formerly residing at Shustoke House, Shustoke, and carrying on business in partnership with Thomas William Hopwood, under the style of Thomas Hopwood, at 25/27, Branston-street. in the city of Birmingham. IMITATION JEWELLERY MANUFACTURER.
Court–BIRMINGHAM.
No. of Matter–67 of 1925.
Last Day for Receiving Proofs–May 17, 1928.
Name of Trustee and Address–Bardell, Arthur Percy, 27, Frederick-street, Birmingham.


Source: The London Gazette - 1st May 1928

HOPWOOD, Frank Sebastian (Separate Estate), residing at Sherstoke House, Sherstoke, and carrying on business in partnership with Thomas William Hopwood under the style of Thomas Hopwood, at 25-27, Branston-street, in the city of Birmingham. IMITATION JEWELLERY MANUFACTURER.
Court–BIRMINGHAM.
No. of Matter–67 of 1925.
Amount per £–20s.
First or Final, or otherwise–First and Final.
When Payable–June 28, 1928.
Where Payable–27, Frederick-street, Birmingham


Source: The London Gazette - 12th June 1928

HOPWOOD, Thomas William, and HOPWOOD, Frank Sebastian, both residing at Shustoke House, Shustoke, and carrying on business in partnership under the style of " THOMAS HOPWOOD," at 25-27, Branston-street, in the city of Birmingham. IMITATION JEWELLERY MANUFACTURERS.
Court–BIRMINGHAM.
No. of Matter–67 of 1925.
Trustee's Name, Address and Description–
Bardell, Arthur Percy, 27, Frederick-street, Birmingham, Incorporated Accountant.
Date of Release–May 30, 1929.


Source: The London Gazette - 2nd July 1929

HOPWOOD, Thomas William, and HOPWOOD, Frank Sebastian, both residing at Shustoke House, Shustoke, and carrying on business in partnership under the style of THOMAS HOPWOOD, at 25-27, Branston Street, in the city of Birmingham. IMITATION JEWELLERY MANUFACTURERS.
Court–BIRMINGHAM.
No. of Matter–67 of 1925.
Last Day for Receiving Proofs–Sept. 30, 1931.
Name of Trustee and Address–Hoult, Clement, 191, Corporation Street, Birmingham, Official Receiver.

Source: The London Gazette - 15th September 1931

HOPWOOD, Thomas William, and HOPWOOD, Frank Sebastian, both residing at Shustoke House, Shustoke, and carrying on business in partnership under the style of " THOMAS HOPWOOD," at 25-27, Branston Street, in the city of Birmingham. IMITATION JEWELLERY MANUFACTURERS.
Court–BIRMINGHAM.
No. of Matter–67 of 1925.
Amount per £–Is.
First or Final, or otherwise–Supplemental.
When Payable–Nov. 25, 1931.
Where Payable–Official Receiver's Office, 191, Corporation Street, Birmingham.


Source: The London Gazette - 13th November 1931

It may well be that the last notice regarding Thomas Hopwood was the final one. The last advertisement is dated 1932, but may have gone to print slightly earlier.

Although noted as a manufacturer of imitation jewellery, the firm of Thomas Hopwood did produce some work in silver, as can be seen below:

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No assay office registration has yet come to light.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44525
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Location: England

Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 11, 2013 10:32 am

LIGHT & WITCOMB

8, Augusta Street, Birmingham

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Light & Witcomb - Birmingham - 1894


An interesting piece of jewelry is the " In Memoriam " brooch and cross which has been registered by Messrs. Light and Witcombe, of 2 Augusta Street, Birmingham, of the late Cardinal Newman. The designs were submitted to the Fathers of the Oratory, and approved by them, and copies of the brooch and cross have been accepted by Father Neville, the Cardinal's early friend, and by Cardinal Manning. It is pronounced to be a work of art and a faithful likeness, and the die has been sunk with much care by one of the best firms in the trade.

Source: The Trader and Canadian Jeweller - December 1890

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44525
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sat Jun 15, 2013 2:11 pm

DAVID CAPELL

46, Pershore Street, Birmingham


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David Capell - Birmingham - 1860

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 44525
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Sun Jun 30, 2013 8:41 am

ECCLESTON & HART (formerly Hyde & Son Ltd.)

47, Warstone Lane, Birmingham


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Eccleston & Hart - Birmingham - 1946

The company's origins can be traced back to 1837 and the establishment of the jewellery manufacturers Hyde & Son. In 1927 the business was acquired by Hyde & Son's manager, Raymond Eccleston, and Joseph Hart, another Birmingham Jeweller. The name of Hyde & Son Ltd. was restyled to Eccleston & Hart.

During WWII, the firm's tool shop was converted from jewellery manufacturer to the production of fuses and aircraft de-icer systems for the war effort.

Following the war the firm turned to duel manufacturing of both jewellery and engineering, with the Raymond's son, Donald running the jewellery division and developing and producing the first expanding bracelet called 'The Triumph'.

The business converted into a limited liability company in 1959.

Trev.


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