Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 09, 2015 9:50 am

JOHN HENLEY

52, George’s Street, Cork


CORK INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION - 1883


Certificate

John Henley, 52, George’s-street, Cork. Stall No. 5I9.–For work done at stall. We recommend that Mr. Henley be awarded a Certificate of Merit for silver chains made at his stall, and for his use of electro-gilding and plating in his work.


Source: Report of Executive Committee, Awards of Jurors, and Statement of Accounts - 1886


This business later appears in directories as 'A. Henley'

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 10, 2015 11:31 am

BRETON & SONS

100, Patrick Street, Cork


Image
Breton & Sons - Cork - 1885


CORK INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION - 1883

Medals

Breton and Sons, 100, Patrick Street, Cork. Stand No. 512.--1, for collection of old silver plate; 2, for elegance of design in jewellery ; 3, for high class watches.

This loan collection is peculiarly interesting from the fact that it is principally composed of very beautiful specimens of plate manufactured in Cork in the 17th and 18th centuries, a class of plate that is highly prized just at present, and Messrs. Breton deserve especial credit for seizing the opportunity of getting so fine and interesting a collection of plate together for exhibition. We think that Messrs. Breton deserve a medal for their very beautiful collection of old silver plate. We award a medal for elegance of design in jewellery. We award a medal for high-class watches.


In making the foregoing awards, we observe that many of the exhibitors are making very praiseworthy efforts to manufacture articles for personal ornaments out of the precious metals, and with a certain amount of success, but we are of opinion that their energies are not exactly directed in the proper channel–from the fact, that the workmen seem to take as their models articles which are manufactured in Birmingham and London in very large quantities, and with whom it would be impossible for any Cork manufacturer to vie in price. We think if jewellery of good silver and gold, and fashioned after the type of our ancient Celtic work, such as bangles, collars, and pendants, copied from the antique, and indeed jewellery generally of a good description was manufactured in Cork, that there would be a good chance of re-establishing a branch of manufacture for which we were at one time famous. The antique silver by Messrs. Breton proves that about 150 years ago articles in silver were manufactured here of a very high class, and to a considerable extent, and we see no reason why there should not be a revival in one of our ancient manufactures, especially as we observe a considerable amount of energy displayed in the production of articles of inferior quality and design.

Robert Day, jun., Alderman, F.S.A., M.R.I.A., Cork, Edmond Johnson, Master of the Corporation of Goldsmiths, Dublin.


Source: Report of Executive Committee, Awards of Jurors, and Statement of Accounts - 1886

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 03, 2015 3:06 pm

WILLIAM MARTIN

8, Prince's Street, Cork


7th June 1737

"That Peter Lane, having served Wm. Martin, silversmith, be admitted free."


Source: The Council Book of the Corporation of the City of Cork - Richard Caulfield LL.D, F.S.A. - 1876



"1 September, 1738.–Ordered that the sum of nineteen pounds ten shillings be paid by the chamberlain of this citty to William Martin, silversmith, for new casting and gensing [graving ?] the silver maces of this citty, according to the report made by Mr. Augustus Carre."

Source: A History of the City and County of Cork - Mary Francis Cusack - 1875

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 09, 2015 2:02 pm

WILLIAM O'SULLIVAN & SON

29, Grand Parade, Cork


WATCHMAKER wanted to go to Cork. Apply O'Sullivan, Jeweller, Parade, Cork.

Source: Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser - 6th April 1900

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 09, 2015 2:10 pm

WILLIAM O'DELL

Old George's Street, Cork


INSOLVENT DEBTORS

At Cork, January 17:

William O'Dell, late of Old George's street, city of Cork, jeweller.


Source: Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser - 22nd November 1865

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 09, 2015 2:19 pm

EDWARD HACKETT

14, Grand Parade, Cork


BANKRUPTS

COMPOSITIONS AFTER BANKRUPTCY

First meeting on Tuesay 23rd Nov.

Edward Hackett, of 14, Grand Parade, in the city of Cork, jeweller.


Source: Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser - 3rd November 1875


BANKRUPTS

ADJUDICATIONS

Oct. 26

Edward Hackett, of 14, Grand Parade, in the city of Cork, jeweller.


Source: Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser - 6th November 1875


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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 09, 2015 2:36 pm

LOUIS FERDINAND MOMBER

29, Maylor Street, and of 64a, St. Patrick Street, Cork


INSOLVENT DEBTORS

At Cork, Oct. 17:

Louis Ferdinand Momber, late of No. 29, Maylor-street, and of 64a, St. Patrick-street, both in the city of Cork, watchmaker.


Source: Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser - 24th August 1872

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 13, 2015 5:05 pm

NOTES ON SOME EARLY EXAMPLES OF CORK SILVER

BY ROBERT DAY, J.P., F.S.A., &c., FELLOW, VICE-PRESIDENT

Among the MSS. collected by my late lamented friend, Doctor Caulfield–a portion of which I purchased at the sale of his library by Bennett, in January last–is an interesting corporate receipt, which throws some additional light upon the manufacture of silver plate in Cork, and has the autograph of Robert Goble, silversmith, of whose family and works records have already appeared in the pages of this Journal.

Image

It has the following endorsed upon the back:–“Received of Mr. Jonathan Perry the contents of the within note this 5th day of November, 1711. ROBERT GOBLE.”

I cannot find in the “Council Book of the Corporation of Cork, either of the names mentioned in this inventory, but on referring to its pages I find that on June 19th, 1711 it was ordered that “Capt" Jonathan Span, commodore of the Jamacia fleet now in the harbour, be presented with the freedom in a silver box.”

On August 20th, “That the freedom, in a silver box, be presented to the Lord Chancellor if he comes to town, as expected.” And on Sept. 4th, “That Richard, Earl of Cavan, the Lord Chief Baron Rochfort, and Mr. Justice Nutley, be presented with the freedom of the city, in silver boxes.” These exactly account for the item dated Sept. 6th, “for six boxes,” &c. The records of the Council have frequent references to the
freedom being granted in such presentation boxes, and in gold caskets when the freedom was conferred upon members of the Royal Family or upon Lord Lieutenants. No doubt, the School of Art Metal work that flourished in Cork during the 17th and 18th centuries was fostered by the municipal body, for on August 21, 1762, we find that £46 9s. 5d. was ordered to be paid to Alderman Hodder for one gold box and three silver boxes. Again, on Oct. 19th, 1763, “That His Excellency, Hugh, Earl of Northumberland, Lord Lieutenant of this Kingdom, be presented with his freedom in a gold box.” And on the 10th January, 1764, “That £41 16s. 103d. be paid Wm. Reynolds, silversmith, for the gold box in which his freedom was presented to the Lord Lieutenant.” I am enabled to illustrate this subject with a box that has lately come into my possession. It has no Hall or Town mark, but bears the maker's stamp of W. R. in a ligature for William Reynolds, who has left some fine examples of his work in two-handled chased cups, sugar bowls, baskets, cream jugs, ladles, tea and coffee pots, &c., &c.: upon these, in addition to his own stamp, he also used the town mark of “STERLING,” but upon small objects like this box he simply placed his trade mark. On May 23rd, 1764, it was ordered “That the Right Honourable William, Earl of Shelbourne, and the Rt. Hon. Wm, Earl of Dunmore, be presented with their freedom in silver boxes.” This minute of the Corporation was duly carried out: Wm. Reynolds got the order and duly supplied the boxes. The Earl of Shelbourne was presented with one that was designed for him, and it is now here for your inspection. It is circular in form, measuring 3¼" diam', by 1½" high, and has the city arms, chased with considerable skill, in bold repoussé work upon the cover. It contains a vellum scroll 14¼" long by 2" deep, which has at its left hand, and immediately before where the inscription commences, an impression, in red sealing-wax, upon a purple ribbon of the city arms, impaled with those of Bennett; ' and the legend– “*SIG RECORD . . . OR CIV CORKE, 1738.” And written in a fine clear hand in four lines:–“Be it remembered that on the twenty-third day of May, one thousand seven hundred and sixty-four, the Right Honourable William, Earl of Shelburne, was, by the unanimous consent of the Mayor, Sherriffs, and Common Council of the city of Corke, admitted and enrolled a freeman at large of the same. ... In testimony whereof the Seal of office of the said city is hereunto affixed the day of year aforesaid.

"Exd. by Wm. SNOWE, C. CLK."

This was William Petty, second Earl of Shelburne, a Major-General in the army, who distinguished himself at Minden and Kampen. In 1760 he was aid-de-camp to George III., and he succeeded to the Earldom in 1761. In 1782 he was appointed First Lord of the Treasury, and although his administration lasted little more than seven months, yet, in that brief period, the siege of Gibraltar was brought to a triumphal
termination. The British fleet, under Howe and Rodney, obtained brilliant victories over the French, and an honourable treaty was negotiated with the Continental Powers and the American Colonies.

Another form in which the freedom was conferred, when not presented in a gold or silver box, was on a sheet of vellum, measuring 10" x 8", from which a circular silver box 1½" diameter, engraved with the city arms and motto, and containing the corporate seal in red wax, was suspended by a blue silk ribbon. I have brought one of these to further illustrate my subject. It has the city arms within a regally crowned garter, resting upon the mace and sword in saltire, with the following inscription:–

“THE RIGHT WORSHIPFUL EDWARD NEWSOM, MAYOR.–Be it remembered that at an assembly of the Mayor, Sherriffs, and Common Council of the city of Cork, at the Council Chamber of said city, on the sixteenth day of July, in the year one thousand eight hundred and twenty-two, the freedom at large of this city was unanimously voted to John Lloyd, Esq., His Majesty's second Serjeant at Law, and chairman of the Special Sessions now holding in this city, for his upright and firm discharge of the important duty with which he was commissioned. Done under the common seal of the city of Cork, the 16th day of July, 1822.

W. JONES, Town Clerk"

The Special Sessions of which Serjeant Lloyd was chairman was held under “the Insurrection Act,” and in a newspaper cutting of the period I have found the following note:

“Cooper's trial, June 26th, 1822.

“Mr. Serjeant Lloyd, the Recorder, and a number of Aldermen took their places on the bench.” These were the days when the old Corporation flourished in Cork, and when the honorary freedom was so frequently conferred, that the vellum engrossments were printed, blank spaces being left for filling in the name and date in manuscript. In that portion of the Paper upon “The Silver Mace of the Cork. Guilds,” now in the South Kensington Museum, contributed by me, I was enabled through the courtesy of Francis Hodder, Esq., to describe at p. 348, No. 65, vol. vii., 4th Series, a silver tankard preserved in his family to which I will refer the reader. Since writing that article I have learned from the Caulfield MSS. that the arms of the city of Cork, as anciently borne, were three lions, as we see in the Royal Escutcheon of England. These arms were engraved in 1749, when the tankard “was re-made at the expense of George Hodder, Esq., Mayor;” and through the kindness of Francis Hodder, Esq., his direct descendant, I am enabled to place the tankard before you for your inspection. You will see it bears upon its front the arms of the city as they are at present used, while the cover is engraved with the more ancient heraldic bearings. The reason of these having been borne was, that Cork had never been granted to any feudatory, but always held by the Crown. In a deed among the Caulfield MSS., dated at Cork the Thursday after the feast of St. James the Apostle, temp. Henry V., the Mayor, John Myagh, used the seal with three lions when attesting the document. The fact of this having been previously the arms of the city must have been well known to its Mayor in 1749, who had them so well pourtrayed upon the tankard's cover. There is a letter in the State Paper Office, London, noted by Dr. Caulfield, from the Mayor, Bailiffs, and Council of Cork, to the Lord Deputie, Sir Edward Bellingham, Knt., date 27th August, 1548, sealed with the arms as used at present; and among the same Papers another letter from the same body, date 16th April, 1563, in which the Royal Arms occur again: proving that seals bearing the two different devices were in actual use at one and the same time. Among the Roche Papers was a deed with a castle at each side of a bridge. This bridge stood where Paradise-place is now, and one of the castles is called “Parentiz.” It is constantly mentioned in old charters, &c., relative to the city. It is said in Cork that the two castles in the present arms are intended to represent the King's and Queen’s Castles, which were situated at the entrance to a dock for foreign ships, about where Castle-street now stands. There can be no doubt from the motto" (which is from Virgil's Æneid, Lib. II. 23, with the alteration of one word), that the natural capabilities and unrivalled excellence of the harbour was intended to be shown forth by the entire device.

* I can find no published list of the Recorders of Cork, but I am happy to say that our Associate, Mr. Cecil Crawford Woods, of Chiplee, Cork, will soon supply the want. I am indebted to him for the information, that Joseph Bennett, ancestor in the female line of the Bennetts, of Bennett's Court, county Cork, was Recorder from 1738 to 1768, when he died. The date upon the seal is that of his appointment to the office.


Source: The Journal of the Royal Historical and Archaeological Association of Ireland - 1890

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby scorpio » Tue Mar 17, 2015 9:41 am

Very interesting post Trev. Cork Corporation sure liked handing out freedom boxes!

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Fri May 08, 2015 1:44 pm

CORK-MADE SILVER CHALICE

I have recently acquired a Cork-made Silver Chalice, without lettering, engraving, or device of any kind, which was probably used in private Communion. It has a tulip-shaped cup, with raised globular knop, and rests on a circular foot. The cup was originally gilt, but now only tracings of the gilding remain. It is marked under the foot and under the lip with the two stamps of William Clarke, of Cork, namely the Townmark of STERLING and W.C. This William Clarke was at the close of the 17th and commencement of the 18th Century the most eminent silversmith in Cork. He was probably the last who used the 17th Century Ship and Castles, which were used by him in 1709 upon the Communion plate of Kilshanig. On a portion of the Carrigaline Church plate and of St. Peter’s, Cork, his name occurs associated with the sterling mark.

With the chalice is its paten on foot, which also bears the same marks as those on the cup. It forms a support for the chalice, which fits down upon its raised rim. Both weigh 6 oz. 16 dwt.; the Chalice is 4 5/8 inches high, the Paten 3 1/4 inches in diameter. \Vith these, but not in any way belonging to them, is an altar stone slightly polished from use and age, which was found at Tristernagh Abbey, Co. \Vestmeath, and bought from the finder in March, 1866. It is circular in form, and measures 3 inches across the top and narrowing to 2 inches at the base. To further illustrate the character of W. Clarke’s work, I have brought a 10-inch circular fluted fruit-dish, weight 17 oz. 13 dwt., with his “sterling” mark.


As read by Robert Day F.S.A.. J.P. at the first Winter Meeting of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, held at the Cork Library , Pembroke Street, Cork, on Friday evening, 6th November 1908.

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Mon Dec 21, 2015 1:07 pm

STEPHEN WALSH

An example of the work and mark of Stephen Walsh:

Image

Image

See: http://www.925-1000.com/IrishProvincial_08.html#M

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Tue Dec 22, 2015 7:11 am

CALEB WEBB

An Irish caudle cup 4¾" in height:

Image

The cup, fixed with two plain scroll handles has unusual repoussé work, consisting of monkeys in the act of drinking and smoking, with a mug and candlestick before them, and with trees and squirrels. Above the short moulded foot, which has a cable band, is a low row of upright acanthus leaves.

It is thought that the cup was wrought about 1690 by Caleb Webb of Cork.

The cup was part of the collection of Colonel Claude Cane that was displayed at the Irish International Exhibition that was held at Dublin in 1907.

The image is also from 1907.

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 22, 2016 11:06 am

JAMES FOUCAULT (FOUCAULD)


6th Dec. 1714

William Lane to be admitted free, having served Mr. Tho Browne, Town Clerk.
Like to John Hingston, having served Mr. John Morley, Mercht.
Like to William Freeman, Esq. and James Foucauld, jeweller, during residence, each paying 20s.


Source: The Council Book of the Corporation of the City of Cork - Richard Caulfield LL.D, F.S.A. - 1876


..........James Foucault was another leading goldsmith, often employed by the Corporation. He must have been that Jacques, son of Peter Foucault, surgeon, of Dublin, who was apprenticed in 1700 to the Dublin goldsmith, John Harris.

The earliest notice of him in Cork occurs in 1714, and by 1729 he was dead, for, in July of that year, the Council ordered "that £8 6s. 0d. be paid to the Widow Foucault for seven silver boxes given with freedoms."

Simon Peter Codier, who was one of Foucault's apprentices, was made free in 1725. The latest notice of him occurs in 1759.


Source: The Huguenot Settlements in Ireland - Grace Lawless Lee - 2009

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Mon Sep 11, 2017 2:04 pm

CORK SILVER

For several centuries the City of Cork was noted for the skill of its craftsmen in the manufacture of silver. In the Cork Records of the 15th and 16th centuries were found several references to goldsmiths, and there are a number of exquisite chalices and patens of this period preserved both in the City and County, testifying the unique skill of the goldsmiths and silversmiths of old Cork. This industry attained to considerable importance and prosperity in the 17th and 18th centuries, and several of the Master Wardens of the Goldsmith Guild were elected Mayors of Cork. After the Union it rapidly declined, and before 1850 the Guild had ceased to exist. The only piece of silver work between that date and 1910 that is known to have been made in Cork is a model of Shandon Church, made for the Exhibition of 1883 by the late Mr. Clare, foreman jeweller at Messrs. Wm. Egan and Sons, Cork. During this period Cork was entirely dependent on imported silver, and the old traditions, which had existed for so many generations, of pride of craftsmanship and excellence of workmanship, disappeared absolutely. Of the score or more of busy workshops, humming with industry, ringing to the sound of many hammers, cheery with the sound of workmen's songs, not a vestige remained.

In 1910 the late Mr. Barry Egan, head of Messrs. W'm. Egan & Sons, Ltd., who had been contemplating the revival of the Industry for some time, had a conversation with Sir Bertram Windle, President of University College, Cork, who wanted a silver mace for the College, to be made if possible in Cork. A start was made, and premises which would admit of considerable development were taken. Workmen were brought from Dublin and the necessary machinery installed. The mace in solid silver, jewelled and enamelled with the arms of the chief towns of the Counties assigned by the Act to the College, was made in the various workshops belonging to Messrs. Egan. Very soon the fact that the firm were making their own silver ware began to spread abroad. In 1911 the Coronation Cup in solid silver, presented by His Majesty King George V. to the Cork City Regatta Committee, was made in these workshops, and many important orders for presentations, household silver, church plate, etc., came from various parts of the country.

In carrying on their work Messrs. Egan at once saw that their chance of permanent success lay in the production of articles which would compare for excellence with the old Cork Silver which to-day, having outlasted the ravages of time and use, is so valuable. They realised from the beginning that it would be impossible to compete with the cheap work turned out by machinery in immense quantities in English factories. They, therefore, bent their energies to the production of articles hammered out by hand, perfect in form and ornament, and of a standard that would compare favourably with the best of the antique work. Silver manufactured in this way, hardened and tempered under the hammer—as it was made one or two centuries and more ago—resists the effects of time and use, while the machine made silver finishes in a soft state, and after some years breaks down and is fit only for the melting pot. We have never lost the craft of the hammersman—the silversmith proper—in Ireland; in England and elsewhere machinery has driven him out. An English trade journal on this subject some years ago said, probably the only silver made to-day that will be fit for use in 40 years' time is the Irish hand made work ; all the rest w ill have broken down and vanished into the melting pot. Ireland, it said, is the last home of the silversmith proper. Messrs. Egan have steadily developed their work, and not only are they manufacturing all classes of household ware, cups, shields, church plate, and reproductions of old Irish silver, but they are extensively engaged in the making of ecclesiastical metal work, and the renewing, relacquering and replating of old work of every description. The founder of the firm, Mr. W'm. Egan, employed one of the last of the old Cork silversmiths ; the present generation of the firm is building up a new school of craftsmen who will bridge the past, and hand on to future generations of craftsmen the traditions of an industry that once was a source of fame and pride to the City of Cork.

CHURCH EMBROIDERIES, VESTMENTS, &c.

The firm of Messrs. Egan & Sons, Cork, has been engaged in the embroidering and manufacturing of church vestments and altar requisites for a considerable period. Until some years ago this industry was on a small scale, giving employment only to a few makers and embroiderers. Then one of the members of the firm, just returned after several years' experience of the industry on the Continent, realised the possibilities here, and at once took steps to develop the industry in Cork. An important order was obtained from the Right Rev. Monsignor Arthur Ryan of Tipperary for a set of vestments in Celtic hand embroidery on cloth of gold. This order was executed so successfully that many others quickly followed, the firm being able to increase its staff as required from the students of the School of Art. In 1914 the most remarkable set of vestments the firm ever undertook to make was commenced, and for over two years nearly thirty expert needlewomen were busily engaged in producing a series of embroideries that are perhaps unequalled in these islands. These vestments are now in use at the Collegiate Chapel of the Honan Hostel, Cork. It is to the enthusiasm and the goodwill of Sir John R. O'Connell, M.A., LL.D., Dublin, for Irish art and craftmanship that the creation of these vestments is due. They are an expression of Celtic art in needlework that is unique. Beauty of form, wealth of detail, gorgeousness of colour, and solidity of work are all seen in these vestments, and will serve as models of Irish ecclesiastical artwork for many generations. Two of these vestments shown at the recent exhibitions of Arts and Crafts in Dublin, in Belfast, and in Cork were much admired.

As well as these articles of artistic craftmanship, this firm has been paying attention to the more usual requirements of this branch of its work. The ordinary vestments used in the Church are embroidered chiefly bv machinery, and all this was of course done on the Continent. Some years ago, after a variety of experiments, Messrs. Egan & Sons installed their first machine, driven by a small motor, and this proved so successful that they quickly put in several more. For several years before the war important orders were executed, not merely for all parts of Ireland and Great Britain, but also for America and Canada. The result was that when war broke out, and imports from France were becoming scarce and more difficult to obtain, the firm were fully equipped for supplying all requirements. Their machines are working fully loaded all the working hours of the week, and they look forward to very important developments after the war. They were the first house in the United Kingdom to install and work these machine embroideries for cheap vestments, and their efforts have been attended with most successful results. These embroideries on Irish poplin, turned into finished vestments in their own workrooms, enable Messrs. Egan and Sons to compete on equal terms with any part of Europe for the ordinary requirements of the Church.

Besides vestments this Cork firm are makers on a large scale of all manner of Church fittings and embroideries, such as lace albs, surplices, oak altars, pulpits, brass candelabra, gongs, thuribles, sanctuary lamps, medals in gold and silver, which they supply in large quantities to all parts of the Kingdom. The development of the department of Applied Art of the Municipal School of Art has given a great stimulus to enamelling, metal working, wood carving, and lace making. Twenty years ago the majority of the medals, Celtic crosses, brooches, badges, clasps, etc., sold in Cork, bore a foreign hall-mark; today ninety per cent, are designed and manufactured in Cork.


Source: Cork, its trade & commerce : official handbook of the Cork Incorporated Chamber of Commerce & Shipping - Cork Incorporated Chamber of Shipping and Commerce - 1919

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 12, 2017 6:40 am

PETER LANE

Cork


7th June 1737

"That Peter Lane, having served Wm. Martin, silversmith, be admitted free."


Source: The Council Book of the Corporation of the City of Cork - Richard Caulfield LL.D, F.S.A. - 1876

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 13, 2017 1:09 pm

WILLIAM EGAN & SONS, Ltd.

32, Patrick Street, Cork


Image
Wm. Egan & Sons, Ltd. - Cork - 1905

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Sat Sep 16, 2017 6:24 am

JAMES MANGAN Ltd.

3 & 4, Patrick Street, Cork

Image
James Mangan Ltd. - Cork - 1919

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Sat Sep 23, 2017 12:52 pm

J. HILSER & SONS

95, Main Street, Cork

Image
J. Hilser & Sons - Cork - 1901

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Mon Oct 02, 2017 2:41 pm

WILLIAM EGAN & SONS, Ltd.

32, Patrick Street, Cork


Image
Wm. Egan & Sons, Ltd. - Cork - 1919

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 20, 2018 1:51 am

JOHN RICKETTS

Cork


An example of the work and mark of John Ricketts:

Image

Image

Image

Noted as working from 1712, John Ricketts was married in 1721 and made a Freeman in 1725. He died in 1737/38.

See: viewtopic.php?f=56&t=50458

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