Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

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Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Sat Dec 20, 2008 1:44 pm

A listing of silversmiths and allied trades filtered from 'Pigot & Co's Directory'--1824--Cork City, County Cork.

Armstrong, John & Co. ..Goldsmith & Jeweller...............85 Patrick Street
Bagley, Richard.......Watch & Clockmaker.....................75 Grand Parade
Barry, Joseph..........Watch & Clockmaker.......................3 Castle Street
Bradford, Richard.....Cutler......................9 Patrick Street & Careys Lane
Byron, William.........Watch & Clockmaker.....................68 Patrick Street
Callaghan, John........Jeweller......................................19 Princes Street
Carroll, W. ..............Watch & Clockmaker.....................5 Princes Street
Danahy, Daniel........Clockmaker....................................7 Nelson place
Egan, William............Jeweller..........................................27 Nile Street
Garde, John...............Jeweller..............................French Church Street
Garde, Richard............Silversmith..................................18 Broad Lane
Green, John.................Engraver.................................34 Patrick Street
Hackett, James............Jeweller.................................41 Georges Street
Hallem, Frederick.........Cutler................................79 North Main Street
Hawkesworth, Edward..Watch & Clockmaker................67 Grand Parade
Haynes, Samuel..........Watch & Clockmaker................114 Patrick Street
Heyland, William.........Jeweller & Engraver........................13 Nile Street
Mahony, Kean.............Silversmith..............................Drawbridge Street
Mangan, James ..........Watch & Clockmaker..................81 Patrick Street
Millikin, Robert............Watch & Clockmaker................30 Georges Street
Montjoy, John D. .........Watch & Clockmaker......................Bridge Street
Murphy, John...............Watch & Clockmaker.................59 Patrick Street
Nicolson, Nicholas.........Watch & Clockmaker................70 Grand Parade
Obree, Henry................Goldsmith & Jeweller...............1 Georges Street
O'Brien, Francis............Watch & Clockmaker..............13 Georges Street
O'Shaunessy, Mark.......Watch & Clockmaker................23 Grand Parade
Salter, James*...............Goldsmith & Jeweller................34 Grand Parade
Seymour, John.............Silversmith..................................William Street
Tolekein, John..............Goldsmith & Jeweller................84 Grand Parade
Towers, John................Cutler................................16 North Main Street
Tulon, William...............Goldsmith & Jeweller..............127 Patrick Street
Wyburd, George...........Jeweller.........................................4 Nile Street


*James Salter moved in this year (1824) to 34, Grand Parade, his workshops were formerly at 2 Tuckey Street. He entered his mark at Dublin in 1827. In 1841 he emigrated with his family to New Zealand on board the 'Sophia Pate', but during the voyage the ship sank and all were lost, save one boy. (See Jacksons p.721)


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Postby dognose » Fri Nov 27, 2009 4:16 pm

Image

A new name to me, but presumably a worker of some note, judging by this 1883 advertisment.

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Postby dognose » Sat Nov 28, 2009 1:12 pm

James Francis O'Crowley of 89, George's Street, Cork, is listed in the 'Retail Optician' 'Retail Silversmith' 'Electro Plater & Gilder' and 'Artist in Hair' sections of 'Kelly's Directory of the Watch & Clock Trades 1880'.

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork--1824

Postby dognose » Thu Jul 07, 2011 3:17 pm

Near the base of the above advertisement from James F. O'Crowley, is mention of his manufacture of 'The Lane Testimonial', below are the details of this huge work, weighing 200 ounces and standing 36 inches in height and 30 inches in breadth.


THE LANE TESTIMONIAL

Mr. James F. O'Crowley, 89, Old George's Street, Cork.


Every Irish dealer in precious metals is a watchmaker and manufacturing jeweller, " if," in the words of the " Grand Duchess," "his own words may be believed;" but, unfortunately for the welfare of the country, and the general good faith of the craft, many of them are in hard fact the makers of nothing except, perhaps, unfounded statements. Mr. O'Crowley is the exception which proves the rule for, since the establishment of his workshops in 1878, he has been the bona fide manufacturer of brooches, ear-rings, bracelets, chains, lockets, epergnes, and almost every article of gold and silver jewellery. The exhibit of this truly Irish manufacturer is composed for the lesser part of the articles already enumerated, but the great object at his well-stocked stall is the Lane Testimonial. This superb ornaments has been presented to Mr. William J. Lane, T.C., of North Mall, Cork, for his efforts on behalf of Irish manufacture. Never was reward more honestly and gallantly won, and the history of his great services to the Country have, indeed, been all too poorly rewarded. On the 19th August, 1881, Mr. Lane first proposed the holding of a National Exhibition as the best and surest means by which the sinking industries of the country might be revived and developed. Through the stormy months that followed his name was but little heard; but, at the never to be forgotten meeting held on the 22nd December, 1881, in Dublin, when the abandonment of the Exhibition was decided upon on purely political grounds, his manly protest and vote were recorded against this suicidal measure. A few weeks later a meeting was convened at the Dublin Mansion House for the revival of the Exhibition movement, and at this meeting Mr. Lane brought forward the resolution recommending the holding of the Exhibition, and the formation of a Company for that purpose. Through the weary days that succeeded Mr. Lane stood gallantly by the side of the faithful few with whom he was associated, and to his energetic action and sleepless industry is due the success of the undertaking, and the great place occupied by the City and County of Cork in its record. The Testimonial which Mr. O'Crowley exhibits has been purchased by the subscriptions of Irishmen of every creed and class, and, beautiful though it be, it falls far short in its recognition of the invaluable services rendered by this patriotic and high-minded gentleman. The proposed Testimonial was submitted to the Testimonial Committee in the form of a rough sketch furnished by Mr. O'Crowley, and this was, when approved, worked into an elegant design by Miss Caroline Beatson, of the Cork School of Art. The Testimonial is in the form of an epergne, surmounted by four cut glass basins, which are supported on a trailing vine, luxuriant with fruit and ample foliage, emblematic of prosperity and happiness. At the base the typical figure of Erin bends over a strung harp, with the wolf-dog at her side. The details of these figures are worked out with marvellous grace and finish, the harp being an exact model of Brian Boru's Harp, as shown in the Museum of Trinity College, Dublin. The piece is 36 inches in height, and 30 inches in breadth, while the figure at foot measures 6 inches, and the entire silver work of the Testimonial weighs 200 ounces. The vine and figures stand upon a hexagonal ebonised stand, the sides of which are decorated with silver plates, with allegorical representations of art, industry, etc. On the front panel the following inscription appears ;–


Image

The artistic style of this fine piece of plate will best be estimated by actual examination; the most minute attention has been given to every portion of the details, the twining of the tendrils, the rough surfacing of the leaves, the graining of the bark upon the vine stem, are all evidence of the most careful workmanship, consummate skill, and true taste and culture. We congratulate the Committee and subscribers on having found such an object for their admiration as Mr. Lane, and we felicitate every one concerned in having enlisted in the enterprise so much talent and skill as Mr. O'Crowley has displayed.

Source: Illustrated Guide to the Cork International Exhibition - H C. Hartnell - 1883

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork--1824

Postby dognose » Fri Jul 08, 2011 3:57 am

An image of the mark of James Francis O'Crowley can be found at: viewtopic.php?f=56&t=24069

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork--1824

Postby dognose » Sat Dec 03, 2011 2:51 pm

JOHN TOLEKIN

John Tolekin's workshop was noted as being located at the corner of Old George's Street, on the Grand Parade, immediately opposite Daly's Club.

Source: Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society - Volume 2 - 1893

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork--1824

Postby dognose » Mon Dec 05, 2011 10:54 am

Image
Arms of Cork


A listing of silversmiths and allied trades filtered from 'A Directory, and Picture, of Cork and its Environs' - William West - 1810.

Austin, Thomas...........Watchmaker...............................................Grand Parade
Bagley, Richard...........Watchmaker...............................................Grand Parade
Bennett, Thomas.........Optician & Mathematical Instrument Maker............Patrick Street
Brookes, Thomas.........Watchmaker...............................................Castle Street
Byron, William............Clock & Watchmaker......................................North Main Street
Carroll, John..............Clock & Watchmaker......................................Paul Street
Conway, James...........Watchmaker...............................................Grand Parade
Corbett, Daniel...........Jeweller.....................................................Patrick Street
Easterby, J................Clock & Watchmaker......................................Hanover Street
Geary, Francis............Optician.....................................................Paul Street
Gibson, Joseph...........Jeweller.....................................................Grand Parade
Greaves, William.........Clock & Watchmaker......................................Mardyke Street
Harding, Robert..........Cutler........................................................Broad Lane
Harding, William.........Cutler........................................................North Main Street
Heyland, James..........Silversmith..................................................North Main Street
Heyland, William.........Goldsmith & Jeweller......................................Castle Street
Hunt, Thomas............Optician.....................................................Patrick Street
Michell, Robert...........Cutler........................................................Grand Parade
Montjoy, R. ..............Clock & Watchmaker......................................Grand Parade
Montjoy, Thomas........Watchmaker................................................Grand Parade
Nicholson, Nicholas......Silversmith..................................................Grand Parade
O'Brian, James...........Sword Cutler.................................................Tuckey Street
Reily, Samuel............Silversmith & Jeweller.......................................Daunt's Square
Ross, William............Clock & Watchmaker........................................South Mall
Seymour, H. .............Pewterer & Wiredrawer.....................................Paul Street
Sheppard, David.........Pewterer......................................................Paul Street
Smith, Laurence.........Pewterer......................................................North Main Street
Solomon, I. ..............Silversmith & Jeweller.......................................Patrick Street
Stotesbury, George......Clock & Watchmaker and Watch Glass Manufacturer...North Main Street
Terry & Williams.........Silversmiths..................................................Grand Parade
Teulon, William..........Silversmith....................................................Patrick Street
Tolekin, John............Goldsmith & Jeweller.........................................Grand Parade
Whelply, John............Silversmith....................................................North Main Street

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Sun Dec 18, 2011 10:49 am

Just in case anyone was under the impression that all Cork made silver was made by a tinker seated with his legs either side of a sawn off tree trunk, tapping away with a little hammer under the light of a candle, well, this report may shatter that illusion.

DONNELLY V. EGAN & SON, LIMITED

Before the Vice-Chancellor at Dublin last week, Dr. Donnelly, of 14, Rutland Square, Cork, sought an injunction to restrain defendants, who are jewellers, carrying on business at 32, Patrick Street, Cork, and their servants from keeping, working, or using a large dynamo, gas engine, and electric plant and machinery, on certain premises in Elbow Lane, Cork, at the rear of the defendants establishment to the injury of the plaintiff's adjoining premises. Mr Ignatius J. O'Brian, with whom was Mr Stephen Rowan, Q.C. (instructed by Messrs. John L. Scallan and Son), moved on behalf of the plaintiff for an ad interim injunction to prohibit the use of the machinery pending the hearing of this action, relying on an affidavit of plaintiff stating the injury the vibration of the machinery was causing plaintiff's premises, and that defendants had specially covenanted by the lease under which they held the premises in Elbow Lane not to use machinery therein to the annoyance of their neighbours. Mr George Wright, Q.C., on behalf of the defendants, stated that he could not resist the motion, but it should be limited to the large engine and machinery recently placed on the premises, and the action not be further proceeded with. Mr O'Brian consenting, the Vice-Chancellor made an order accordingly, and directed defendants to pay all plaintiff's costs to date.

Source: The Electrical Review - 22nd July 1898

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Fri Dec 28, 2012 1:51 pm

A listing of silversmiths and allied trades filtered from Slater’s National Commercial Directory of Ireland - Cork City - 1846

Gold and Silversmiths and Jewellers:

Austen, Thomas, 21 Brown Street
Barriscale Samuel, 25 Paul Street
Bradford, Richard & William, 72 St Patrick street
Egan William, 46 Princes Street
Greaves James H. 52 Georges Street
Hackett Margaret, 30 Grand parade
Hawkesworth Edward 18 Grand parade
Jackson William, 4 Castle Street
Jennings John, 55 St. Patrick Street
Kelly Edward, 20 Brown Street
Mahony Patrick, 4 Nile Street
Teulon Charles & Samuel, 53 St.Patrick Street


Watch and Clockmakers:

Breton Thomas, 110 Georges Street
Brooks Henry, 12 Grand Parade
Byrom John, 10 Bridge Street
Callaghan Daniel, 37 Paul Street
Coleman John, 11 Grand Parade
Evans John, 120 St. Patrick Street
Hawkesworth Edward, 18 Grand Parade
Haynes Samuel, 51 St. Patrick Street
Jackson William, 4 Castle Street
Mangan James, 3 St. Patrick Street
Murphy Patrick, Clarence Street
Norwood Alexander, 1 Bachelor's Quay
O'Shaughnessy Mark,73 Grand Parade
Pringle Remegle, 11 Tuckey Street
Simkin John, 59 St. Patrick Street
Teulon Charles & Samuel, 58 St. Patrick Street
Thornhill Walter, 97 North Main Street


Opticians and Mathematical Instrument Makers:

Bennett Thomas, 124 St. Patrick Street
Binda John, 25 Duncan Street
Hunt Henry, 118 St. Patrick Street


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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 16, 2013 8:11 am

An article published in 1904 written by Robert Day that records some early watchmakers and silversmiths working in the Cork area.

WATCH PAPERS

By ROBERT DAY, F.S.A.

In the double-cased watches of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, between the watch and its outer case, are still found circular pieces of embroidered silk and lace work, which were primarily used to preserve the inner case of the watch, as the outer shell was often decorated with classical subjects and battle pieces in bold repousse, and so produced a rough interior surface that would have torn and injured the surface. Sometimes circular pieces of silk were substituted, which fitted between the cases, and had printed upon them verses, mottoes, posies, and loving wishes, or else the more prosaic trade labels of either the original makers, or the after repairers of the watches. In the latter case, either pencil or pen marks on the back give the dates of the last cleaning or repairing, and so approximate the age. These labels have often a local interest, as they not only perpetuate the names of the silversmiths who by their work made Cork famous, but they give their addresses and the names and numbers of the streets where they worked. Notably among the few that from time to time I have helped to save from destruction are those of William Martin, to whom were entrusted in 1738 the four silver maces of the city for repairs and restoration, of which the following minute occurs in the "Council Book of the Corporation" by Dr. Caulfield: "Item – That £19 10s. 0d. be paid to William Martin, silversmith, for new casting and graving the silver maces according to the report made by Aug. Carr. 1st. Sep., 1738." Also that of M. Nicolson, who prior to 1809 was junior partner with his brother, John, the well-known silversmith.

His watch paper is printed, and represents a figure emblematic of Time holding an oval shield, inscribed –

"N. Nicolson, watch and clock maker, No. 21 Grand Parade, Cork." Around the margin, "Elegant variety of jewellery, plated ware and hardware." No. 21 Grand Parade was the south corner shop of George's Street.

Martin. – On printed paper, "Martin, watch and clock maker, 8 Prince's Street, Cork," from a watch dated 1769. Upon this also the figure of Time armed with a scythe and holding the hour glass occurs.

Rice. – "Samuel Rice, Mallow, repeating, duplex, lever, and horizontal watch and clock maker." Printed on paper within a circular rope-work border, and in the centre a square and compass upon the leaves of an open book.

Carroll. – "William Carroll, watch and clock maker, George's Street, Cork. " On printed paper, a figure representing Time, pointing to a clock, the dial of which has " Carroll, Cork." Written upon the back of the paper, "W. C, 1821." The watch is gold-plated on copper, and is made by "S. Houston, Dublin, No. 912."

Fuller. – "Fuller, watch and clock maker, 21 Patrick Street, opposite Prince's Street, Cork"; written on the back is "April 14, 1820. This paper label has also a figure of Time seated on a moss-grown rock, on which the name and address, as above, are inscribed.

Mangan. – There was a very artistic label used by the late Mr. James Mangan in his old-established Patrick Street factory, where the writer had the privilege of seeing him working with his own hands upon the great turret clock of Shandon, which he made throughout in his workshop. His watch paper has a figure of Minerva resting on a pedestal with the inscription, "Mangan, time piece maker, Patrick Street, Cork." On it a clock supporting a figure of Time, and in the background half hidden by the trees, the tower and spire of Old St. Barry's. The plate is signed by its engraver, "B. Galland, Sc." Mr. Mangan has long since passed away, but he has left a worthy successor in his son.

Simkins. – "John Simkins, watch and clock maker, 13 Patrick Street, Cork, two doors from Fish Street. " A printed paper label.

Embroidered silk – "May thy days be blest – C. L."

Lace – Upon a rose-pink ground a very delicate and beautiful piece of minute white lace work.

Silk – Printed on white silk, in the centre – "Lash'd to the helm, should seas o'erwhelm, I'll think on thee, my Love" ; and round the margin –"The Glorious No Surrender 1688."

Silk – Printed on white silk –
"Too late I staid, forgive the crime,
Unheeded flew the hours,
For noiseless falls the foot of time,
That only treads on flowers.

Oh ! who to sober measurement,
Time's happy swiftness brings,
When Birds of Paradise have lent
The plumage of their wings."


A wish –

" Wherever you dwell, may content be your lot,
And friendship, like ivy, encircle your cot ;
May each rosy morn, dressed in mantle of peace,
Shed health o'er your cottage, your blessings increase ;
May gay, smiling plenty adorn each spot,
May sorrow ne'er enter the door of your cot ;
May your honest endeavours be crown'd with success,
May you ever live happy, ne'er witness distress ;
May good humour and mirth in your rural retreat
In your cottage of friendship with innocence meet ;
On your neat humble roof may those blessings descend,
'Tis a wish free from guile : 'tis the wish of a friend. "

This is printed in seven circular lines, narrowing to the centre, across which in capital letters is the final word, Friend.


Source: Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society - Volume X - 1904

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 17, 2013 11:58 am

WILLIAM KNAPP

William Knapp, son of the late John Knapp, of this City, clock and watch maker, who served an apprenticeship to Mr. James Aicken, has opened shop at "The Sign of the Dial", near Broad Lane, Main Street, where he makes and mends all sorts of clocks and watches on the most reasonable terms.
March 10, 1760.


Source: Cork Evening Post - 1760

William Knapp's business in Cork may have been short lived, as a William Knapp, Watchmaker in Annapolis, was advertising in the Maryland Gazette - 22nd March 1764, part of the advertisement states: "As he has been regularly bred to the Watch Making Business and has had Instructions for the most eminent from London and Dublin in that way."

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 23, 2013 2:00 pm

A listing of Cork jewellers in 1879:

Atkins Brothers, 14 and 15 Patrick Street
Brennan Francis, 83 St. Patrick Street
Breton and Son, 100 Patrick Street
Browne Robert T. 14 Grand Parade
Egan William and Sons, 32 Patrick Street
Gates G. 13 East beach, Queenstown
Hackett James, 42 Patrick Street
Haynes and Son, 51 Patrick Street
Hilser Brothers, 95 South Main Street
Hinley J., 18 Pembroke Street
Loville William S , 30 Grand Parade
O'Callaghan E. and Co., 26 Patrick Street
Silver C. and Co., 121 Patrick Street
Taylor R. 34 George's Street
Wheeler William, 9 Bridge Street
Williams D. 33 George's Street

Source: The Commercial Directory and Shippers Guide - 1879

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 12, 2013 3:47 pm

The Death of James Salter, Silversmith of Cork

That James Salter and his family died during a sea voyage from Cork to New Zealand on board the brig 'Sophia Pate' in 1841 is well known. What is, perhaps, not so well known is the actual details of that fateful journey as most period accounts are somewhat sketchy. Below I've put together a couple of the accounts that expose a dreadful end for the passengers of the 'Sophia Pate'.

The first short report is likely to be this one:

The Sophia Pate, Harrison, from Auckland to the Bay of Islands, and Kiapara, with twenty-five passengers, is totally wrecked near the latter place; the master and ten men saved; twenty-one lives lost.

Source: The Asiatic Journal and Monthly Register for British and Foreign India, China and Australasia - 1842



James Buller, reminiscing on his life in New Zealand in 1878 recalls the disaster:

THE "SOPHIA PATE"

In the year 1838, Dr. Day was passenger in a ship - which called at the Hokianga. She was three months loading with a cargo of spars. During this time, the Doctor resided at Mangungu. He made a trip to the Kaipara, with the Rev. N. Turner, and, having been commissioned by some friends in Cork to buy land, with a view to their settlement upon it, he entered into a negotiation with Parore for a fine piece, in the Kaihu valley, perhaps about a thousand acres. The bulk of the goods stipulated for, was to be brought by the settlers.

In pursuance of this object, Messrs. Salter, Wilkinson, Stannard, and Stewart, with their families, embarked– in all twenty-two persons. They were to be pioneers for others. They reached Auckland, and thence, finding no other way of getting to the Kaipara, with their belongings, they chartered the brig Sophia Pate to convey them. They called in at the Bay of Islands, where Messrs. Stannard and Stewart resolved to go overland, via Hokianga, expecting to get there before their friends, and make some preparation for them. They had comfortable quarters at the mission-houses, for the first two nights, but after that had to trust to the hospitality of the Maories.

They were going along the sea-shore, and on the third night, turned aside into a beautiful valley called Waimamaku. The men were at work on their cultivations. The women prepared for them the best food they had, and garnished, with clean fern, one of their best huts. As night came on, the men, one by one, dropped in from their field-work. Their faces were tattooed, their arms and their legs were bare, and they wore shaggy mats. The strangers found themselves the "observed of all observers." They knew not what was said, but the talking seemed to be in earnest. A nervous fear began to creep over them; they questioned their own prudence in having ventured themselves among such a people. Presently there was a pause– an ominous silence! They thought the critical moment had come. They watched every movement. A man puts his hand into a bag. He pulls out–not the gleaming weapon which they feared, but–a book! Then a hymn was sung; the Scripture was read; their heads bent in prayer. The visitors, without doubt, were remembered in their petitions. And now the confidence of the travellers was reassured; they slept soundly, and left, to follow their journey, the next morning, with the good wishes of their hosts.

Our two friends arrived at their destination to hear that the vessel was a total wreck, and their friends were all drowned, but one little boy, called John Wilkinson. Very early on that morning of September 6th, 1841, I was aroused from my sleep, by the sad announcement of the event. My boat was soon launched and manned, and I rowed down the river. At the Warau, I took our two grief-stricken friends into the boat. At Mangawhare, ten miles further down, we found the captain and crew, with the little boy. They had saved themselves by getting into the boat, hanging on the davits, while the sea was breaking over the ill-fated ship, until high water, when they were able to row the boat ashore. We proceeded together to the scene of the wreck, which was embedded in the sand. We learnt that, after the vessel struck, Mr. Salter called his family and friends around him, in the saloon, and there, knee-deep in water, commended them all to God. One by one, they were swept away, by the rolling waves of that broken sea. We found several of the bodies on the sandy beach, and, digging graves in the sand, I read the burial service over them.

In this painful way, a scheme, from which we had hoped much good, was crushed in the beginning. On account of circumstances connected with this shipwreck, I felt it my duty to go to Auckland, and our two friends went with me. Not many months before, that site had been selected for the seat of Government. About two thousand souls were collected there already, living, for the most part, in tents and shanties. A land sale had just been held, and, as the proceeds of it, as much as ,£25,000 found its way into the Treasury.

It was on a Saturday morning when we arrived. On the next day I preached to about eighty Maories in the morning; and in the afternoon to a congregation of English, who met in a saw-pit in Mechanics' Bay. In the evening I had service in an auction-room. There still live in Auckland, a few who remember those occasions. I stayed several weeks, and preached every Sunday wherever I could find a place. I waited on His Excellency Governor Hobson, who promised me an acre of land, in a good position, as a church-site; and I took some steps towards the organizing of a church, with the few members I found there. This was the "day of small things." Auckland remained under my charge, until a resident minister was appointed. Meanwhile money was collected, and a neat wooden church was built, and opened, under auspicious circumstances, by the Rev. John Warren and myself. The only minister then living in Auckland was the late Rev. F. Churton, who for a short time was salaried by the Government as the Colonial Chaplain.


Source: Forty years in New Zealand - James Buller - 1878



But the account reported in 'The New Zealand Journal' is by far the most revealing and damming:

WRECK OF THE SOPHIA PATE

The Cork Reporter relates a disaster which has occurred in New Zealand; with the intimation that some particulars are suppressed "for a few days"–
"In the month of November 1840, three or four families of the city of Limerick (sic), remarkable for their industry and prosperity in their respective lines of business, including Mr. James Salter, his wife, and ten children, a respectable jeweller residing for many years on the Grand Parade, Mr. John Wilkinson, wife, and four children, boot and shoemaker of Daunt Square, and Mr. Stannard of Hammond's Marsh, we believe a cabinet maker, broke up their respective establishments and sailed in the ship Neptune for Sydney, their place of destination being New Zealand. Mr. Salter had made an extensive purchase of property at New Zealand, through the agency of a friend who had been there and reported most favourably of the country, and took out a considerable quantity of plate and other property. The Neptune arrived at Sydney in good order, and the emigrants landed, and sojourned there some three or four months, during which period Mr. Salter made provision there for one of his sons.

"Matters being in readiness and all arrangements perfected, the families of Messrs. Salter, Wilkinson and Stannard, proceeded in the month of August last, in the clipper Sophia Pate, from Sydney; and arrived, after a run of about three weeks, in the Bay of Islands. Here, having stopped a short time, Mr. Stannard proposed to walk across the country, about fifteen miles distant, to the spot towards which they had looked for months in that spirit of anxiety and solicitude natural under the circumstances. The proposition to proceed overland was not agreed to by Mr. Salter or Mr. Wilkinson, upon the ground that it might not be prudent in them to leave their trunks. and boxes to the care of others; and Mr. Stannard, accompanied by one of Mr. Wilkinson's sons, set off, leaving the remainder to proceed coastways.

"Upon arriving at the destined spot, he was astonished that no tidings of the vessel had been received; and he immediately proceeded to the residence of the chief of whom the property had been purchased for Mr. Salter; and whose welcome was most gracious. Accompanied by a Methodist Missionary in connexion with the London Institution, and a number of followers, the chief proceeded to the harbour likely to be selected as a landing-place by the clipper; when they were met by the master and crew, wearing Mr. Salter's clothes. Explanation quickly followed. The master reported, that when close to shore the vessel struck, and had gone to pieces; and that all on board, except himself, the hands, and a child of Mr. Wilkinson, had perished. The chief, an extremely intelligent man, instantly suspected that all was not right: his suspicions extended to his followers; and it was only by the greatest of exertions by the Missionary that the natives were prevented tearing the crew limb from limb.

"A portion of poor Mr. Salter's property, in plate, was found on the captain; and he and his crew being first stripped of the clothes on them, were conveyed to Auckland, a principal town in New Zealand, to await their trials.

"Young Mr. Wilkinson is stated to have represented, that when the ship struck, Mr. Salter entreated the captain to lower the longboat; and he did lower her, but it was to send her adrift; upon which he was asked to let down the jolly-boat; he refused at first, but upon letting her down, he and the crew lowered themselves into her, providentially pushing young Wilkinson, in the confusion, before them; he got to the bottom of the boat, and thus escaped; the last scene he witnessed on board, being Mr. Salter and family at prayer in the cabin, which at this time was filling fast with water."

Since the above was in type, the Colonial Gazette of Wednesday has afforded us some further intelligence of this melancholy occurrence.

The Auckland Herald of Sept. 25, states that the Captain had been examined by the magistrates, and had been acquitted of criminality.

The following is an account of another wreck.

Accounts were received at Lloyd's on Saturday, of the wreck of the ship Sophia, of London, on the night of the 2nd October last. She was on her voyage from New Zealand (Port Nicholson) to Kiapara, and had on board a rich cargo. It occurred at about twelve o'clock at night, during a tremendous gale of wind, off the Bay of Islands. The master, Captain Harrison, and ten seamen, saved themselves by clinging to the rigging and portions of the wreck ; but the remainder, consisting of twenty-eight seamen and passengers, and two women, met a watery grave. The vessel is said to have been worth £5,000; but whether she is insured or not is not known.

Letters have been received in London from Mr, Stannard, dated from the Wesleyan Mission station, at Kiapara, in New Zealand, September 18th and 20th, giving more authentic accounts of the loss of the brig Sophia Pate. It was on its way from Sydney, having called at Auckland and the Bay of Islands. On board were Mr. Salter and all his family, except one who is called Jamesy, who was left at Sydney, and Mr. Wilkinson and his family. Mr. Stannard went to meet them at Kiapara; but on his arrival on the 10th September, he found that the vessel had been lost an the 29th August. It struck on a sand-spit as it entered the river. " They then cast anchor, and strove to bring round her bead, but she drove on further and firmer in the sand. It was then proposed to the Captain to lower their long-boat, and attempt to land the passengers; but he declined, saying she was not sea-worthy. Shortly after, the vessel bumped so on the sand they were forced to cut away the masts (about six o'clock); the sea, which had been rising from the time she struck, now broke over the vessel with great violence; the longboat was first washed away, then her lee bulwarks; and at by this time she was filled with water, the passengers were all on the quarter-deck, holding on by the frame of the sky-light and remaining bulwarks; the crew were also holding on by the davits and jolly-boat. Our dear friends were unable to maintain this fearful straggle with the waves very long, and by seven or half-past seven o'clock they were all, together with Stephen Ellis, servant to Mr. Atkins, the captain's wife, and another passenger washed from the wreck; the only exception to this work of destruction was young Johnny Wilkinson. He appears to have held on the longest: and when all besides were lost, and he cried out he could hold on no longer, the Captain lifted him into the jolly-boat, and made him lie down under the bows. About an hour and a half after, the sea was more calm and the tide falling, when the crew (eleven in number) lowered the jolly-boat and succeeded in reaching the shore. They remained on the beach where they landed until Friday evening, when they crossed the heads, and the next day proceeded up the Waxroah as far as Mr. Forsaith's, where they were when I arrived on the Monday. During their stay on the beach, five of the bodies were washed on shore ; dear Mrs. Salter's, Sally's, Matty's, Mrs. Stewart, and her child's, (Mrs. Stewart was wife to Mr. Wilkinson's brother-in-law, who, I should have informed you, accompanied me overland) these they interred in the sand. Several of our boxes, together with a number of our barrels of flour, biscuit, pork, beef, powder, soap, and various articles, also came on shore; these the crew broke open, rifled our boxes, dressed themselves in our linen and clothes, and destroyed a great part of what they could not appropriate to themselves. On their bringing the intelligence of their wreck up the river, some Europeans who live here, took a boat and proceeded to it, as did also a man who lives near the Heads; these finished the work of plunder which, the crew had commenced.

"The beach for some miles was strewed with the wreck of our goods; but our boxes, &c, had been smashed to pieces, and everything worth carnage had been taken. I could not recover so much as a shirt or pair of stockings, although I was much in want of both. The sailors had all of them a bundle of our things each, and it was anything but pleasing to see my good shirts on some and my friend's on others, while one clean and one dirty was all I had in my possession; to employ force was out of the question, and there was no Magistrate on the river. Mr. Buller and myself, however succeeded in shaming the Captain into the delivery of our friend James's silver teapot, basin, ewer, four table-spoons, a dozen dessert-spoons, and one dozen tea-spoons. While he was reluctantly giving up these, a second dozen of our friends tea-spoons came in sight and although the cresting was exactly similar to that on the desert-spoons, he audaciously insisted that they were his own, and we had not the means to wrestle them from him."


Source: The New Zealand Journal - 1842

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 16, 2013 2:26 pm

A listing of Jewellers, Silversmiths, Watchmakers, taken from Guy's City and County Almanac and Directory of 1891


Atkins Bros (jewellers), London House, 15, Patrick Street
Barriscale William, 21, 22 North Main Street
Brennan Francis, 83 Patrick Street
Breton and Son, 100 Patrick Street
Brooks H S & Son, 8 Grand Parade
Cowie H (jeweller), 73 Patrick Street
Egan W and Son, 32 Patrick Street
Ford R T (clock maker), 84 South Main Street
Hackett James, 42 Patrick Street
Haynes Samuel & Son, 51 Patrick Street
Henley A, 52 Georges Street
Hilser J and Sons, 95 South Main Street
Jenkins E, 6 Sullivans Quay
Lovell & Co, 30 Grand Parade, 69 Georges Street
Mangan James, 3 Patrick street
McNie S F (jeweller), 102 Patrick street
Neff John, 65 Grand Parade
O'Callaghan and Son, 4 Tuckey Street
O'Crowley J F, 89 Georges Street
O'Sullivan William & Son, 29 Grand Parade
Queens Old Castle, 86 to 89 Grand Parade
Sivel C, 89 South Main Street
Sutton D, 60 Patrick Street
Taylor Richard, 33 Georges Street
Wheeler Mrs Sarah, 9 Bridge Street

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 21, 2013 3:12 pm

DEATHS

On the 4th instant, in Cork, Mrs. Irish, relict of the late Mr. John Irish, Silversmith.


Source: Freeman's Journal - 12th April 1820

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 04, 2014 5:14 pm

THE ENGRAVED SILVER RELIQUARY OF ROBERT AND MARY COPPINGER, 1660

By Robert Day F.S.A


Image

Some fifty years ago as a farm labourer was working under the ruined walls of the castle of Mashanaglass, near Macroom, in this county, he turned up with his spade a silver locket, oval in shape, having a hinged cover, and engraved upon it the Nativity of our Blessed Lord. This was unfortunately injured by the spade, but the subject and its treatment can be distinctly traced. In the foreground is the infant Saviour in a cratch or cradle, watched over by the Blessed Virgin, who looks intently upon her child, and with her St. Joseph, who holds a candle in the left hand, while he shades its light from the infant's eyes with the right. In the background are the supports and rafters of the stable, and an ass is in its stall. In this neither the infant, the mother, nor St. Joseph are nimbed.

The back of the relic case is uninjured, and represents the Adoration of the Magi.* The three kings are crowned, and are presenting their gifts to the infant Saviour, who is held in a sitting posture on the Virgin's knees, with hands outstretched to receive the offerings. Immediately behind both is St. Joseph. Here there is a rayed glory on the babe, and a ring-shaped nimbus upon the Virgin and St. Joseph. Engraved underneath the lid is the crucified Redeemer, with the inscription I.N.R.I., and falling from each of His hands are three drops of blood, and from His wounded side two more. Enclosed within, and fitting the locket closely, is a gold Teston of Ranuccio Farnese, fourth Duke of Piacenza and Parma, A.d 1593-1622. The inscription upon the obverse is RAVT(ius) FAR(nesius) PLA(centiae) P(arma) DVX. IV. S(anctae) R(omanae) E(cclesiae) CONFfaloniesus); reverse, "PLACENTIA FLORET."

But what gives this seventeenth century silver box its family and historic value and interest is the inscription upon the back, engraved on the lower edge beneath the picture :–" Robt- Coppinger and Margarett Coppinger als. Roche." In turning to the history of the Copingers** by our valued colleague and Council Member, W. A. Copinger, esq., I find the descent of this Robert Coppinger, from John Copinger, who married, 1553, "Kateryne, daughter of Dominick Roche and Gennett Goul. Their son, John, was Alderman and Mayor of Cork; born, 1556; died, 1637; married Katherine, daughter of Richard Roch, of Kinsale, gent., whose third son, Thomas Coppinger, of Carhue, county Cork, married Katherine Gould, and had two sons. Stephen, of Carhue, married, 1670, Katherine, daughter of Henry Hayes, esq., of Cork; and Robert Coppinger, who married in 1660, Margaret, daughter of Dominick Roche, esq., of Cork, and died without issue."

This box, with its enclosure, was, therefore, a wedding gift of silver and gold from Robert Coppinger in 1660 to his wife, Margaret Roche. The labourer by whom it was found took it to the Rev. S. G. Fairtlough, rector of the parish of Ahinagh*** who presented it to Mr. Thomas Stephen Coppinger, of Sandyhill, county Cork, from whom it came to his step-sister, Mrs. Harding, of No. 7, York Terrace, Cork, who has kindly entrusted it to me for illustration, and has supplied me with the interesting incidents of its finding. It is quite possible that the engravings upon this box, although attributed to Benuenuto Cellini, are the work of a Cork artist, the pointed crowns upon the three kings, and the head-dress of St. Joseph, are so very Irish in character. At that time–about the middle of the seventeenth century–the Cork School of Art metal workers in silver were possibly second to none, and were fully capable of executing better work than that upon this reliquary. Moreover, the lettering of the names is certainly not Italian. The box, I should say, was made for the coin, and the blank space in the border work was filled up by the two names. The Carhue mentioned above was one of the many family seats of this ancient and illustrious county Cork family, and is only a short walking distance from Mashanaglass Castle, where the lost love-token lay hidden for so many years, until it was so happily restored to the family of its original owners.

*One of the most popular stories accepted by the Christians of the middle ages was that of the wise men being three kings of Arabia–Melchior, Balthazar, and Jaspar–who made offerings to our Saviour, and whose bodies travelled first to Constantinople, thence to Milan, and lastly to Cologne, by various removals, and hence were known as the three Kings of Cologne. Their names were used as a charm, and occur as a talisman on fourteenth century rings.–Vide Wright's Edition of the Chester Plays, and Smith's Collectanea Antiqua, vol. i., p. 115.

**Manchester, 1882.

***The Rev Samuel Gerard Fairtlough was rector of Ahinagh from 1824 to his death on the 23rd of December, 1852.

Source: Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society - Cork Historical and Archaeological Society - 1895

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 25, 2014 8:06 am

WILLIAM JACKSON

4, Castle Street, Cork

Deaths

January 30, at 76, Grand Parade, Cork, Catherine Anne, wife of William Jackson, Jeweller


Source: Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser - 2nd February 1859

William Jackson was recorded in Slater’s National Commercial Directory of Ireland - Cork City - 1846 (see above post).

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 31, 2014 5:43 am

WILLIAM TATE

Patrick Street, Cork

MELANCHOLY SUICIDE IN CORK

On Wednesday morning Mr. William Tate, jeweller, of Patrick-street, was found dead in his bedroom, having committed suicide. The circumstances of this lamentable affair are of an unusually sad character. Mr. Tate had been suffering for over two years previously with an affection of both legs; during that time he was more or less an invalid, which caused him at periods dreadful agony. For some days before he had laboured under a recurrence of the disease, which it appears, reached a pitch of intolerable suffering on that day. Beyond intense physical anguish, nothing peculiar was noticed in his condition by the members of his family who saw him for the last time alive. Next morning one of his sons, entering his bedroom, was horrified to find the body of his father dead and cold, life having been apparently extinct for some time. Deceased had hung or rather strangled himself with the bell rope, the body lying on the floor. It is supposed he had risen during the night, and, rendered insane with pain, had put an end to his life. Mr. Tate was a man in the prime of life. - Cork Examiner.


Source: Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser - 21st January 1869

A similar report (The Morning Post [London], Saturday, January 23, 1869) stated that William Tate was around 50 years of age and an Englishman by birth.

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 06, 2014 2:58 pm

A listing of Cork Jewellers, Silversmiths, Watchmakers, taken from Guy's Directory of Munster - 1893:

Atkins Bros (jewellers), London House, 15, Patrick Street
Barriscale William, 5, Bridge Street and 21, North main Street
Brennan Francis, 83, Patrick Street
Breton and Son, 100, Patrick Street
Brooks H S & Son, 8, Grand Parade
Egan W and Son, 32, Patrick Street
Hackett James, 42 Patrick Street
Haynes Samuel & Son, 51 Patrick Street
Henley A, 52, Georges Street
Hilser J and Sons, 95, South Main Street
Jenkins E, 6, Sullivans Quay
Lovell & Co, 30, Grand Parade, 69 Georges Street
Mangan James, 3, Patrick Street
McNie S F (jeweller), 102, Patrick Street
Neff John, 65, Grand Parade
O'Callaghan and Son, 4, Tuckey Street
O'Crowley J F, 89, Georges Street
O'Sullivan William & Son, 29, Grand Parade
Queens Old Castle Co, 86 to 89, Grand Parade
Sivel C, 89, South Main Street
Standard Watch and Clock Co, 9 Camden Place - S. Spiro, manager
Sutton D, 60 Patrick Street
Taylor Richard, 33, Georges Street
Wheeler Mrs Sarah, 9, Bridge Street

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Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cork

Postby dognose » Wed May 21, 2014 4:07 pm

A Listing of Cork Jewellers, Silversmiths, Watchmakers, &c. in 1945:

Archer, F. & Son, 9 Cook Street.
Brennan Francis, 83 Patrick Street
Cahalane, S., Corner House, Patrick Street.
Dorney, T., 138 Barrack Street
Egan, Wm. 6s? Sons, Ltd., 31, 32 Patrick Street
Finner, E. J., 38a Princes Street
Hilser Bros., 2 Grand Parade Market Buildings.
Hilser, J. & Sons, 95 South Main Street
Long, D. J., 32a Washington Street
Mangan, Jas., Patrick Street
O'Connell, James A., 52 Oliver Plunkett Street
O Riain, Liam, 32 Cook Street
O'Sullivan, Wm. & Sons, 69 Oliver Plunkett Street
Roche, Michael, 61 Patrick Street
Teape, John, H., 57 Patrick Street

Source: Cork City and County Official Directory and Almanac - 1945

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