The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

For information you'd like to share - Post it here - not for questions
dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 37813
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 12, 2019 5:33 am

A CURIOUS ACCIDENT

Blackburn, Lancashire


A large coping-stone, weighing a couple of hundredweight, fell from the roof of a high building in Penny-street, Blackburn, on Saturday night, and crushed through the ceilings of a house into the shop of a jeweller named Robinson. It scattered watches, rings, &c., wholesale. The shopkeeper escaped unhurt, however, but a portion of the stone hit a woman standing by, striking her on the head. Great excitement prevailed, and a posse of police were called to guard the valuables.

Source: Rhyl Record and Advertiser - 31st January 1903

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 37813
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 13, 2019 7:17 am

RENZIEHAUSEN COMPANY

Newark, New Jersey


The name of the William F. Renziehausen Company of Newark. N. J., the well known refiners and gold and silver smelters, has been changed to the Renziehausen Company and the capital stock has been increased from $50,000 to $250,000. The business will be enlarged. The manufacture of sheet sterling and fine silver is carried on in addition to the smelting and refining of gold and silver. The company is located at 43 Oliver St.

Source: The Brass World and Platers' Guide - December 1913

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 37813
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 14, 2019 8:23 am

CHARLES GOODIER

North Attleboro, Massachusetts


Charles Goodier, North Attleboro, a native of France but nearly a life resident of the town where he died, was buried Iast week, the community losing in him a valuable citizen. For many years he held an exceptionally high reputation as an engraver, and has been the holder of responsible positions with Frank M. Whiting & Co., G. K. Webster, and Riley, French & Heffron.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 7th June 1899

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 37813
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 15, 2019 7:43 am

MOSES PEARSON

Portland, Oregon


Mr. Moses Pearson, one of the best known silversmiths in the city, died Monday evening at his residence on Lincoln street. Mr. Pearson came from
Haverhill to Portland over forty years ago and established himself in the silver business, making a speciality of silver spoons, knives and forks. Later on he adopted the silver plating branch and for years did a large business and controlled the principal part of that trade in the city. He first established himself in the old Printers’ Exchange building and later in a shop where Fluent block now stands, which was wiped out by the fire of 1866, and finally on Temple street, where the place of business is managed by his son. Mr. Pearson was 74 years old.


Source: Portland Daily Press - 31st August 1892

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 37813
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 16, 2019 6:47 am

PIUS KEARN - AN ARMED WATCHMAKER

London


At Clerkenwell on Saturday Pius Kearn, a watchmaker, was charged with threatening to shoot James Dyde. The parties lodged in the same house, and, hearing a loud crash one night, Dyde ran upstairs and found Kearn glaring wildly and flourishing a revolver. He shouted, "I'll shoot anyone; I don't care who it is. Let 'em all come." A constable wrenched the weapon from prisoner. It was loaded in four chambers with ball cartridges.—The prisoner, in defence, said he was robbed of £ 20 or £30, and he thought burglars were in his room.—Mr. Horace Smith: You will have to find two sureties in £300 each for your good behaviour, or go to prison for four months.

Source: Evening Express - 12th December 1898

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 37813
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 17, 2019 6:40 am

CHARLES FREDERICK HANCOCK

London


It is a well-known fact in the trade that most of the original members of the large West-end jewelers have either long since retired or have joined the majority. In some instances they have seen their successors also retire. Such was the case with the late Mr. Charles Frederick Hancock, of Hendon Hall and New Bond-street, who died a few months ago at the ripe old age of eighty-three, after being grievously afflicted for a considerable time. His will has been sworn under £62,137.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st July 1891

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 37813
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 18, 2019 7:29 am

SHOURDS, STOREY & KASPER

Chicago


William Holmgrau, bookkeeper and cashier for Shourds, Storey & Kasper, Chicago jewelers, is missing. It is reported to day that his accounts are $10,000 short. Holmgrau had been with the firm eight years. He has not been seen for several days. It is believed that he is in Canada. The dual position occupied by Holmgrau enabled him to carry on his speculations with ease, and for a long period.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - November 1886

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 37813
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 19, 2019 4:29 am

GOOD TIMES FOR CANADIAN JEWELLERS

Montreal


There is plenty of evidence that the jewelry industries have shared in the general prosperity. The increase in trade has been most marked, as the following import figures will show. There were entered at the port of Montreal for consumption during 1899 jewelry and watches and manufactures of gold and silver to the value of $357,116, against $326,443 for 1898, and $297,849 for 1897.

Source: The Trader & Canadian Jeweller - March 1900

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 37813
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 20, 2019 5:36 am

NOT A BULL IN A CHINA SHOP, BUT A COW IN A JEWELLER'S SHOP

Chester


Shortly before two o'clock; yesterday (Tuesday) afternoon two cows which wore being driven through Foregate-street, Chester, became unmanageable, and one charged through the large plate glass window of a furniture shop, smashing it into fragments, and severely injuring itself. The other one entered the shop of Mr. Miles, jeweller, and caused considerable excitement by settling itself behind the counter. After some difficulty the precocious beast was got safely out, and fortunately no damage was done to the valuable articles with which the shop was literally crowded. The incident caused considerable excitement at the time.

Source: The Chester Courant - 29th November 1899

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 37813
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 21, 2019 4:44 am

ELIZABETH NEWMAN

London


The city of London boasts of an expert lady jeweler in the person of Mrs. Elizabeth Newman, wife of the decorative artist, Philip H. Newman. She was educated in the South Kensington school of art, and for years made designs for laces, tapestry and jewelery. The noted English jeweler, John Brogden, won the cross of the Legion of Honor at the Paris exposition of 1878 for work done from Mrs. Newman's designs. The committee of award, learning the patterns were devised by a woman, ordered a special bronze medal to be struck for her, an honor granted to no other woman. Her designs also won for Mr. Brogden the gold medal of the French National academy, and at a Regent park flower show her designs for bronze and silver medals were accepted and coined. After the death of Mr. Brogden, Mrs. Newman set up an establishment of her own and employs six skilled workmen to produce her original and exquisite fancies in gold, gems and enamel. This lady also is enthusiastic over her work, not only on account of her own entire success, but because she believes it to be an avocation particularly adapted to the taste, patience and skill of women, and a new field in which they may make most gratifying advancement.

Source: Morning Journal and Courier - 26th September 1891

Trev.


Return to “Contributors' Notes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests