The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Dec 18, 2018 6:35 am

JEWELLERS GOOD FORTUNE

Sydney


Hyman Barron, manufacturing jeweller of 273 Pitt Street, Sydney, confesses to being a lucky man, he left a bag containing jewellery valued at over £1000 in a tram. The bag travelled on to Bondi, but, through the honesty of the conductor, was returned to Mr. Barron within an hour of its loss having been reported.

Source: The Mudgee Guardian - 28th January 1915

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 19, 2018 6:52 am

WILLIAM ROGERS ISSUES DEROGATORY CIRCULARS

Hartford, Connecticut


Hartford, Conn., Nov. 5.—For some time past William Rogers, whose name Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co. use on their flat ware, has sent out circulars to silversmiths and others over the country derogatory to the members of the firm. Last Monday High Sheriff Preston served him with papers in a suit brought by Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co. enjoining him from issuing any more circulars.

The papers state in substance that the contract between the firm and William Rogers expires next May, and will be renewed for fifteen years. The present contract between the parties stipulates a renewal but does not specify the time, and it is said William Rogers will contest any intended renewal. This Wm. Rogers has no connection with the Wm. Rogers Mfg. Co.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 9th November 1892

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 20, 2018 4:29 am

HEIR TO AN AUSTRALIAN ESTATE

Lincoln, Illinois

A poor harness maker, Edmund H. Moller, who ha lived at Lincoln, Ill., for 30 years, is on the eve of coming into possession of an estate in Australia said to be worth $750,000.

Moller was one of two sons born to a Dublin silversmith and his wife. Nearly 50 years ago the father went to Australia. Subsequently the mother started in search of him, but died In New Orleans. Then an older brother of Edmund's father took up the search and found the father in Sydney, N. S. W., where had become rich.

He communicated his discovery to Edmund, and the latter engaged in a correspondence with his father, who recognized their relationship.

The elder Moller died many years ago, and his family in Sydney refused to recognize or consider the claims of the son at Lincoln. Through the American consul at Sydney, Edmund Moller gained information and proof establishing his claim to his father's estate, of which he is the heir.


Source: Coconino Sun - 20th July 1901

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Dec 21, 2018 5:58 am

FIRST PROSECUTION UNDER THE MERCHANDISE MARKS ACT

Birmingham


The first case under the new Merchandise Marks Act came before the Birmingham stipendiary yesterday, when a jeweller was fined for applying to certain goods a false trade description.

Source: Western Mail - 11th January 1888

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Dec 22, 2018 5:21 am

JEWELLER CONVICTED OF TRICKING AND DRUGGING WATCHMAKER

London


At the Old Bailey on Saturday Elias Weinstein, a Rumanian jeweller, was sentenced to fifteen months' hard labour for stealing fourteen 1,000 franc notes from Hyman Jacobson, a Cricklewood watchmaker.

Weinstein, it was stated, induced Jacobson to withdraw nearly £500 from the bank and purchase the notes as a good investment, saying that Jacobson could sell when the value of the franc was enhanced.

After Jacobson had fallen a victim to what counsel described as this "elaborate confidence trick," he was drugged with a doctored cigarette by Weinstein, who then stole the notes.


Source: Abergavenny Chronicle and Monmouthshire Advertiser - 26th October 1917

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Dec 23, 2018 4:57 am

JEWELLERS' CONFERENCE

Rome


Unheralded and unreported - since much of the deliberations dealt strictly with technical matters - an important conference of the Jewellers of the world, at which several important representatives from England were present, has concluded at Rome. Among other things the conference agreed to a world standard for platInum. This will come as a great refief to the better-class English jewellers, and to the Assay Office, who have for some time been agitating for a hallmark for platinum. It will surprise many people to learn that officially platinum is regarded as one of the baser metals, and that many of the articles sold as "platInlum" contains only 50 or 70 per cent. of that base but expensive metal. A London jeweller gave the assurance that much of which is sold as platinum is merely "white gold." From the point of view of the purchaser it is urgent and important that a hallmark for platinum should be Introduced, as, though even the Inexpert can distinguish between 9-carat and 24-carat gold, only a chemical analysis is capable of revealing what is platinum and what is only platinum alloy. The only guidance - and even this is impracticable in the case of such small objects as rings and brooches "with platinum setting" - is that platinum Is by far the heaviest of the precious metals, and is as much as three times heavier than steel. The Jewellers' congress have now decided that 95 shall be the percentage of platinum in all articles labelled as "platinum."

Source: Manchester Guardian - July 1933

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Dec 24, 2018 5:16 am

JEWELLERS WORK ON CORONETS

London


As the date of the Coronation draws nearer coronets are arriving at the workshops of famous London jewellers for regilding, repair, and alterations.

They belong to families who have treasured them through the years and now want them refurbished—or possibly altered to fit a new peer who has recently succeeded to the title.

Coronets traditionally have crlmson velvet caps trimmed with ermine and a gold tassel, but they are not set with gems. Their design indicates at a glance the rank of the owner.

The coronet of a Royal Duke has aternate crosses-patee and fleurs-des-lis - while that of a Princess of Britain has crosses-patee and strawberry leaves.

Dukes' coronets have strawberry leaves; marquises, four strawberry leaves and four silver balls (or "pearls"); viscounts 16 "pearls"; earls, eight "pearls" and alternate strawberry leaves; and barons, six "pearls". The coronet should fit as comfortably as a hat, but the design of the head fitment varies considerably.

Peeresses in their own right wear coronets exactly the same in design as those worn by peers of the same rank.

For the last coronation the Earl Marshal of England inserted an advertisement in newspapers six months in advance inviting those peers who wished to receive a summons to appear to write to him their addresses.

There were then 739 peers but fewer than 600 attended the coronation. Today there are some 828 peers who have seats in the House of Lords, and among them there will be many who—for age or other reasons—are unable to attend the ceremony.


Source: The Singleton Argus - 7th January 1953

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Dec 25, 2018 5:49 am

GILBERT HALL

Sheffield


LONDON. — A man who never earned more than £3 a week in his life has left a fortune of £46.777 7s 11d in his will. He was 86.

Every Sunday, morning and evening, for more than 80 years. Gilbert Hall went to the Talbot Street Methodist Chapel, Sheffield.

All the congregation knew about Mr. Hall was that he worked as a journeyman silversmith.

The only one who knew his secret was 62-year-old Miss Lucy Ward who kept house for Gilbert Hall for 49 years. And to her he left £5000.

At 17 he started work — "Six in the morning to seven at night, in a silversmithy run by a relative." said Miss Ward.

"His savings he invested— that's where his fortune came from. And when the dividends came in, he reinvested them. too.

"He was a simple man." Miss Ward added: "his favorite meal was bread and dripping"


Source: The Newcastle Sun - 4th January 1947

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 26, 2018 5:16 am

AN EVENTFUL TIME FOR A JEWELER

San Francisco


Arthur J. Eaton, the aged jeweler of 833 Shrader St., who attracted a great deal of attention some weeks ago when he brought charges against his wife and son-in-law for attempting to scare him to death with imitation "spooks," is again in the public eye. This time, however, he had a narrow escape from something more material than "spooks.” While motoring near Watsonville, after nightfall, a meteor fell with a blinding flash close to the machine and exploded. His story is confirmed by his traveling companions and by the inhabitants near by who saw the fall of the heavenly visitor.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 20th October 1909

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 27, 2018 6:55 am

A POLITE THIEF

Santiago, Chile


One evening a respectably-dressed caballero entered the shop of the most extensive silversmith in Santiago de Chili, and requested to look at some images of the Virgin Mary, which were shown to him of various size and manufacture, and while the shopman was seeking for other specimens, the stranger slipped one of the most costly under his cloak, and saying he would like to have a friend's opinion before he made a purchase, took leave of the silversmith with the customary good wishes, Queda asted, con Dios; Yo me voy con la Virgen "Remain with God I go with the Virgin" this he literally did, nor was the witty theft discovered until the perpetrator had time to escape with his prize, valued at 1000 dollars. The old silversmith recounts the anecdote to all his customers, and gives every credit to the robber for his polite farewell.

Source: The Monmouthshire Merlin - 3rd September 1831

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Dec 28, 2018 5:42 am

JAMES CARTWRIGHT

Sydney


Principal Superintendent of Convicts' Office
Sydney, July 19, 1843.


The undermentioned Prisoners having absconded from the individuals and employment set against their respective names, and some of them being at large with stolen Certificates and Tickets of Leave, all Constables and others are hereby required and commanded to use their utmost exertion in apprehending and lodging them in safe custody. Any person harbouring or employing any of the said Absentees, will be prosecuted as the law directs. The age of the prisoners is calculated up to the present time.
J. M'LEAN,
Principal Superintendent of Convicts


Cartwright James, Exmouth, 26, London, silversmith, 4 feet 8½ inches and upwards, pale freckled comp., light brown hair, grey eyes, from Hyde Park Barracks, since 18th Instant.


Source: New South Wales Government Gazette - 21st July 1843

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Dec 29, 2018 4:50 am

WILLIAM A. ROGERS Co., EXTEND FACTORY

Northampton, Massachusetts


The plant of the Wm. A. Rogers Co., Ltd., at Northampton, Mass., manufacturers of cutlery, is to be enlarged by an addition 40 X 46 feet and two stories high. This factory is a branch of the main plant at Niagara Falls, N. Y.

Source: The Brass World and Platers' Guide - September 1910

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Dec 30, 2018 4:41 am

FRENCH INDO-CHINA HALLMARKING

Hanoi and Saigon


There are no regulations in the French Colonies, other than Algeria, requiring the marking of jewelry and manufactures of gold, silver, and platinum with the special hallmark (poinçon de maitre) required in France for all such commodities, whether imported or of domestic origin. A bill is being drafted by the governor general of Indo-China, however, for the purpose of establishing special legislation in that country whereby a guaranty service independent of that of the mother country will be established at Hanoi and Saigon, charged with making tests of manufactures of precious metals and verifying standards.

Source: Commerce Reports - United States Department of Commerce - 13th March 1922

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Dec 31, 2018 6:16 am

ALEXANDER H. TOWAR

Lyons, New York


Alexander H. Towar, who died Jan. 23 at Lyons, N. Y., after a short illness, was associated with Olando F. Thomas in the silver plating business from 1892 until the Manhattan Silver Plate Co. was merged with the International Silver Co., and was superintendent of the Lyons branch of the latter company until it was closed up. Mr. Towar was born Aug. 14, 1836, and on account of his age retired from active business about five years ago. He was a veteran of the Civil War, having served in the engineering corps.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 5th February 1908

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 01, 2019 5:28 am

THE PLATE LICENSE

England


Judging from their action the Inland Revenue authorities at Somerset House are anxious to bring the plate license into disfavour, and make its incidence as irksome as possible. It will be remembered that about two years ago a raid was made by persons in the employ of the Inland Revenue, upon respectable jewellers who held what is called a lower rate license, which would empower them to sell articles of gold to two ounces in weight. An idea prevailed in the trade that in such matters as gold chains the license would cover a chain of any weight which did not contain more than two ounces of pure gold. It was the practice of the informer to purchase such a chain, and a prosecution was immediately instituted by the Inland Revenue. No warning whatever was given or notice issued with a view of making clear the meaning of the Legislature as to the question of pure gold or alloy; nor was only a single case taken up with the object of settling the point authoritatively. The whole proceeding appeared to be actuated by a design to harass and annoy shopkeepers of repute and good name. In some instances, the tradesman having no chains in stock over the limited weight, was induced by the informer to procure one. No effort was made to reach the many dishonest traders, who purposely cheat the Revenue by dealing without any license at all in this sudden burst of official energy, which, either in deference to strongly expressed public opinion, or because no more terrible criminals could be found, appeared to have subsided. But the same spirit still animates the Inland Revenue, as an occurrence within a few days of writing will show.

A watchmaker and jeweller who had for many years carried on business in Dewsbury, holding a higher rate license, took a shop in Huddersfield. Anxious to conform to the law, he sent to the Excise, asking if the license granted to the former occupier of the Huddersfield shop would be recognized, or if he had better take out another? The reply was the old license would be accepted. But this assumption of a desire to do right was too much for Somerset House. Forthwith an emissary was despatched, who selected the only chain in the shop over two ounces, one brought over, in the hurry of stocking the new shop, from Dewsbury, where, it will be remembered, it could have been legally sold. Having completed his purchase, the representative of official virtue blandly tells the seller to prepare for a prosecution. We think it might be fairly asked that cognizance should be taken of the many delinquents who have no license, before taking action, without warning, where there is obviously every desire to conform to the law.

Then, again, is the difficulty of knowing what is actually required by the law. A locket, sold with a chain, may be detached, and therefore would not reckon in the weight. A watch can also be detached from the case; and it therefore appears reasonable the movement would not be subject to duty. Last month a watchmaker of Mansfield, had, however, some misgiving. Knowing how the meaning of an enactment is often twisted to suit particular ends, he determined to be on the right side, and accordingly, in his innocence, he wrote to the Commissioners of Inland Revenue, asking which grade of license would be necessary if he sold a gold watch, the case whereof weighed less than two ounces, but altogether was over that weight.

The following is the reply of Mr. William C. Mitchell, assistant secretary :—

"Inland Revenue,
"Somerset House, London, W.C.
"17th June, 1879.

"Sir,—In reply to your communication, dated the 10th instant, I am desired by the Commissioners of Inland Revenue to inform you that a plate-dealer's license at the higher rate is required, if the article sold be composed wholly or in part of gold, and weigh two ounces or upwards."

Of course, this does not assist the inquirer; it tells him neither one thing nor the other. As he remarks, a gilded door-knocker would appear to come under this definition of gold.

But what would he? The carrying on of a watchmaker's business is not yet sufficiently burdensome; let him prepare for a prosecution!


Source: The Horological Journal - July 1879

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 02, 2019 6:58 am

CLEVER DETECTIVE WORK BY JEWELLERY AGENT

Paris


Having been robbed of some valuable necklaces, a young man named Charles Gys, acting as a jeweller's agent, made up for his mistake by tracing the thief through a clever disguise, following him by train; getting him arrested in Vienna, and recovering the jewels in Paris. A professional detective could not have done better than this young Sherlock Holmes. He had just completed his military service, and a jeweller who had known him as a boy accepted him as an agent on commission, giving three pearl necklaces worth 53,000 francs to sell.

The young man received a proposal from a travelling agent in jewels, whom he had also known for a long time. The travelling agent said be could dispose of at least one of the necklaces. They would have a handsome commission. Charles Gys hesitated at first, but finally trusted the man. The travelling agent disappeared with all the Jewels. Gys decided to trace him. He called on the missing man's wife, and her replies made him suspicious. He felt that she knew where her husband was. If so, It would not be long, he thought, before the two would try to meet.

Charles Gys resorted to a trick worthy of one of Victor Hugo's characters. He had his hair cut and dyed, got a false beard and moustache, and stood guard as a beggar in front of her house. After a few days he saw that the woman was preparing to leave Paris. She left her house in the evening'with her children and drove to the station. The disguised beggar was close at her heels, and when she had taken a seat in the train for Vienna, he was In a compartment alongside. At Vienna, as he had expected, the husband turned up. There was an effusive greeting between husband and wife, and whispers passed between them. Gys followed them to the house where the husband had rooms, and after watching them for a few days he learned that the man was also a deserter from military service in Austria, of which country he was a native. He denounced him to the Austrian police and had him arrested. The jewels had been sold to two men in Paris, whose names he obtained, and who have now been arrested by Paris police for illegal dealing. Gys soon recovered two of the necklaces, and he has good hopes of recovering the third. The money obtained by the thief was deposited in a bank at Munich. Gys went to Munich and obtained an order from the Courts to seize the money pending the inquiry. If Gys was not successful as a salesman, he proved a clever detective.


Source: The World's News - 7th June 1913

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Re: The Daily Snippet - Past News of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 03, 2019 6:11 am

INTERNATIONAL SILVER SECURES INJUNCTION AGAINST M.S. BENEDICT Mfg. Co.

New York


An injunction was recently secured by the International Silver Co. restraining the M. S. Benedict Mfg. Co., East Syracuse, N. Y. from making or selling silver plated ware stamped Wm. H. Rogers, on the ground that it simulated and infringed certain “Rogers” trade-marks controlled by the plaintiffs. This injunction, which was entered by consent, was issued by Judge Coxe, of the United States Circuit Court for the Northern District of New York, in an action commenced by the International Silver Co., last November. It was brought against the M. S. Benedict Mfg. Co., M. Stuart Benedict and Harry O. Benedict, who were acting as selling agents for Wm. H. Rogers, Plainfield, N. J., whose name on the silver ware was the cause of the suit. The International Silver Co. asked for a preliminary injunction and demanded a judgment, giving them the usual damages and costs, and a perpetual injunction restraining the defendants from making, selling or disposing of any silver plated ware bearing the name of Wm. H. Rogers or any abbreviation thereof that would lead the public to think that these goods were manufactured by the International Silver Co. The defendants finally consented to the preliminary injunction and the action will probably be discontinued.

No action has yet been commenced against Wm. H. Rogers, of Plainfield.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 27th February 1901

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