Weird combination of marks, help to decipher? 875 silver Jardiniere

PHOTOS REQUIRED - marks + item
Sparta5
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Weird combination of marks, help to decipher? 875 silver Jardiniere

Postby Sparta5 » Mon Nov 16, 2020 3:34 am

I recently purchased this item and noticed it has a weird combination of marks. It is 875 silver which seems to be very uncommon for Germany. The maker appears to be Gebrüder Deyhle. The piece also contains Russian import marks as well and the assayer appears to be Kliment Zagayevksy. I believe the piece was made in Germany and required to be of 875 fineness and then was exported to Russia where it way assayed and marked. I'm confused on where the 875 silver mark is coming from. Does anyone know? I also understand this is the German silver forum and Russian marks don't belong here but I think they might be necessary to understand this piece in it's entirety.

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dognose
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Re: Weird combination of marks, help to decipher? 875 silver Jardiniere

Postby dognose » Mon Nov 16, 2020 4:20 am

Two items within a few days!

See: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=57213&p=185473

Trev.

AG2012
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Re: Weird combination of marks, help to decipher? 875 silver Jardiniere

Postby AG2012 » Mon Nov 16, 2020 5:44 am

Hi,
If you take a closer look at 875 mark you will see worker`s head facing right and a hammer bellow.
It as re- marked in Soviet Union after the revolution, which is not uncommon.
The mark is colloquially known as ``head with hammer mark`` (Клеймо голова с молотком).
Regards

AG2012
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Re: Weird combination of marks, help to decipher? 875 silver Jardiniere

Postby AG2012 » Mon Nov 16, 2020 5:48 am

Btw.it is a nice example Art Nouveau or German Jugendstil with typical floral wavy lines, regardless of being machine die stamped. Unfortunately, glass insert is missing, as well as one handle.
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Qrt.S
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Re: Weird combination of marks, help to decipher? 875 silver Jardiniere

Postby Qrt.S » Mon Nov 16, 2020 7:58 am

The fineness of 875 equals with 84 zolotnik, which is the lowest fineness that could be exported to former Russia. The Russian import mark confirms this fineness. The mark the head and sledge hammer with 875 is a remarking made by the Soviet authorities enabling the object to be sold in former Soviet Union.

Sparta5
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Re: Weird combination of marks, help to decipher? 875 silver Jardiniere

Postby Sparta5 » Mon Nov 16, 2020 8:06 am

Thank you guys!!

Ag2012 I actually have the missing handle (it came off in transit and also because of a previous repair) and original glass bowl as pictured below. I am seeking to get it restored and received a quote from my local silversmith to solder the handle back on, clean, and antique it. However, right now as is it is a dark color. Would this have been the original finish or is it just very heavily tarnished? To me it looks very even throughout to be tarnish? Thuoghts?
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Sparta5
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Re: Weird combination of marks, help to decipher? 875 silver Jardiniere

Postby Sparta5 » Mon Nov 16, 2020 8:08 am

Also, what would you guys date this piece?

Qrt.S
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Re: Weird combination of marks, help to decipher? 875 silver Jardiniere

Postby Qrt.S » Mon Nov 16, 2020 9:04 am

The Russian import mark was used 1898-1907. It doesn't necessarily mean that it was made then but it cannot be newer that 1907. The Art Noveau/Jugend style dates it to around the turn of the century.

AG2012
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Re: Weird combination of marks, help to decipher? 875 silver Jardiniere

Postby AG2012 » Mon Nov 16, 2020 10:31 am

Hi,
The handle is hollow and utmost care should be taken when soldering. I mean hard soldering, not with soft a low-temperature tin-based solder.
If the previous repair was done with soft solder there is a problem because tin residuals will prevent hard solder flow and hollow handle can actually deteriorate (burn) beyond repair. There is evident green corrosion and also dark patina to be completely chemically cleaned before soldering.
Successful soldering is not easy and it is done this way:
1.Cleaning of both parts
2.Fixing the handle to jardinière with steel wire in desired position
3.Heatng both parts close to desired soldering temperature with the torch (take care to not overheat ).
4. Apply flux to the joints
5. Apply solder either in form in small rectangles cut from solder sheet or touching the joint with solder rod under the torch.
6. When done, heat the entire piece again and the pickle it in diluted sulfuric acid.
7. Rinse with water and brush with brass brush
Pickling and brushing with brass brush will leave silver shiny white and I prefer leaving it like this because it will tarnish sooner ot later to desired antique patina. Just leave ut exposed to elements (polluted air and acidity in the air will do the job ).
Regards

Sparta5
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Re: Weird combination of marks, help to decipher? 875 silver Jardiniere

Postby Sparta5 » Tue Nov 17, 2020 1:24 am

Thanks for the info, that seems like something that I will have professionally done as it doesn't seem like something I would feel comfortable doing.

Also, why would the piece have been remarked after the Russian Revolution? Was it taken and re-assayed? What was the reasoning behind this? Thanks!

AG2012
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Re: Weird combination of marks, help to decipher? 875 silver Jardiniere

Postby AG2012 » Tue Nov 17, 2020 4:06 am

Remarking was done for various reasons, most often when the item was to be sold in state owned pawn shops. Also, I suppose they made an inventory of confiscated silver. Worker`s head and hammer mark appeared in 1927.
For example, Poland had special so called Lombard mark for pawn shops (the owl seen on Imperial Russian silver).
Remarking and combination of marks are often seen in newly emerging countries after the Great War.
In some countries new owners brought silver to assay offices for re-marking.
Interestingly, it is a mystery what happened to punching tools in assay offices during wars and occupations. I think most of them were stolen (the fact I can tell for sure for at least two assay offices).
We can only imagine the chaos during those turbulent times when empires were destroyed to dust.
Regards


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