Need some help with prill mark

PHOTOS REQUIRED - marks + item
indyzgal
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2008 12:34 pm

Need some help with prill mark

Postby indyzgal » Tue Nov 25, 2008 1:00 pm

Can anyone help me with this prill gallery tray, is it silver or plated, and possible date on this item




http://i284.photobucket.com/albums/ll20 ... DC0004.jpg
http://i284.photobucket.com/albums/ll20 ... DC0011.jpg
http://i284.photobucket.com/albums/ll20 ... DC0013.jpg
(admin photo edit - images too large - insert as link only - see Posting Requirements)
Image

byron mac donald
Posts: 410
Joined: Tue Jan 30, 2007 1:45 am
Location: Central Ca. USA

Postby byron mac donald » Wed Nov 26, 2008 3:12 am

Hello-

From what I can see (not very well) it could be prill (could you take another picture without the flash?). Either way... if it is than it should be marked with this wonderful sites logo "925" or "sterling", if not it is a lovely piece of silverplate.

Regards-

Byron

Ahriman
Posts: 17
Joined: Fri Mar 28, 2008 11:36 am
Location: Welsh Marches, UK

Re: Need some help with prill mark

Postby Ahriman » Wed Nov 26, 2008 5:29 pm

indyzgal wrote:Can anyone help me with this prill gallery tray, is it silver or plated, and possible date on this item


To eliminate much of the glare and enhance the blunt graphical quality, I have flipped your image into a negative which makes a number of things clearer. Firstly, it is marked to the left of the armorial cartouche with a "P" and an "S" in their own circular cartouches, usually signifying "Plated Steel", something which is strengthened by the impression of considerable numbers of distinct rectilinear striations running bottom left to top right in your picture, suggesting this is close plated rather than electroplated.

(Close plating was/is a form of fusion plating where a thin foil of silver is bonded by heat to the base metal by means of a thin layer of tin acting as a 'solder' between the two principal metals. Heat is applied causing the tin to melt, acting as a 'glue', and fuse the two principal metals together. The striations are caused by the soldering iron applying the heat moving across the foil, rather in the manner of a clothes iron. Close plating was/is mainly applied to items like cutlery, salvers, platters, where the base metal to be plated was steel.)

The mark itself in the armorial cartouche appears to have been overstruck, the remains of the first strike still being visible at the top of the escutcheon. The overstrike mark is too damaged in/by the picture to say much about but for it to be a Prill mark you would have to be convinced that the symbol in the top right quadrant of the shield is a pair of crossed keys, and in the top left a lion (?) rampant. What's left of the first strike could indeed have a pair of crossed keys in the right quadrant. I've attached a pristine Prill mark as well as the negative of your picture (both are thumbnails) in case it can help things along.

All the best,

Image
Image

admin
Site Admin
Posts: 2492
Joined: Fri Apr 01, 2005 6:52 pm

Postby admin » Thu Nov 27, 2008 1:59 am

armorial cartouche with a "P" and an "S" in their own circular cartouches, usually signifying "Plated Steel"


In this case the "PS" stands for Prill Silver Co., note the "Co" to the right of the trademark. As a mid 20th century piece it would be electroplated nickel silver or copper.

Regards, Tom

Ahriman
Posts: 17
Joined: Fri Mar 28, 2008 11:36 am
Location: Welsh Marches, UK

Postby Ahriman » Thu Nov 27, 2008 6:41 am

admin wrote:
note the "Co" to the right of the trademark.


Nice catch. Crossed my mind but couldn't securely make 'Co' of it. Did wonder after posting whether I was leading myself down my own garden path <g> but as I can't delete nor can I amend my own posts here, there was not a lot I could do about it... :-))

All the best,


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