South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 09, 2013 8:25 am

JOHN PARDY

322, West Street, Durban

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Pardy - Durban - 1897

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An image of John Pardy taken in 1906

The Jeweller and Watchmaker, John Pardy was born in Kent, England, in 1844, the son of Peter Pardy, of Shannon Bridge, Ireland.

John Pardy arrived in the Colony in 1872. In 1885 he married Elizabeth Richardson, they had one son.

His private residence was noted as Sylvan Cottage, Musgrave Road, Durban.

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 14, 2013 10:18 am

LEWISON & PARKER

58 St.George’s Street, Cape Town

Some details of the incredibly short partnership between George Lewison and James Hamilton Parker:


We the Undersigned entered into Partnership on the 15th day of November 1843
under the Style or Firm of LEWISON & PARKER.
Geo. LEWISON
James Hamilton PARKER
Cape Town, 16th January 1844


Source: South African Commercial Advertiser - 17 January 1844


To Clock and Watch Makers & Jewellers &c
The Undersigned having relinquished his Watchmaking Business will offer for sale this morning (Saturday) the 27th instant at 11 o’clock precisely at Mr. CAUVIN’s Sale on the Parade, the following Articles, all without the least Reserve:
Main Springs, Watch and Clock
Lunettes, Common and Time-piece Glasses
Eye do.
Gold Hands
Inside Chains
Bows and Pendants &c
And a variety of Tools and Materials of every description suitable for the Trade.
George LEWISON
58 St.George’s-street


Source: South African Commercial Advertiser - 27th January 1844


In 1842, George Lewison thought his honor had been attacked in Cape Town by J.M. Phillips, who had "maliciously and mischievously" held him up to "public ridicule and contempt by means of certain two sketches, paintings, drawings, or pictures..... being caricature likeness" of Lewison*. Lewison won his case and was awarded twenty shillings. It is unclear how these caricatures were conveyed to the public.
* Lewison v. Phillips, appeal of Magistrates Court verdict, civil cases, v.2, May 1842. WCA: CSC 2/1/1/50


Source: Slave Emancipation and Racial Attitudes in Nineteenth-Century South Africa - R.L. Watson - 2012

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 15, 2013 12:08 pm

LODEWYK WILLEM CHRISTIAAN BECK

Shortmarket Street, later, Greenmarket Square, Cape Town

Born: 16th December 1813
Baptised: 26th December 1813
Apprenticed to: Lawrence Twentyman
Married: (I) Maria Brink - 21st June 1835
Married: (II) Elizabeth Johanna de Wet - 6th February 1844

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Sometimes questions of honor revolved around hats; lifting one's hat was commonly a sign of respect for one's social betters. In 1832, one Robert Ross was brought to trial because he attacked Lodewyk Beck for refusing to remove his hat when he entered the establishment of the prominent jeweler and silversmith Lawrence Twentyman. Ross was the manager of Twentyman's shop. Beck was Twentyman's apprentice, but because the incident occurred before abolition, it is likely that he was a white. When Twentyman himself testified about the episode, he stated that "I consider my apprentices bound to obey" Mr. Ross, and "the custom in my shop is for apprentices to take off their hats." Beck refused Twentyman's order to doff his hat, and, as the silversmith told it, "once before in that day on account of his insolence I positively told him to take his hat off." Given the elite social standing of Twentyman, it is not surprising that Beck's assault complaint against Ross was dismissed.*

This was a case primarily about class. Clearly Twentyman believed that his position in society had earned him at least outward signs of respect from his social inferiors. Beck, for personal reasons perhaps only he knew, disagreed, but it is significant that enforced bareheadedness was the obligation of apprentices but not, it seems, of others.

* King v. Ross, January 5, 1832. Criminal Court Records, 1831-1832. WCA : I/CT 6/16


Source: Slave Emancipation and Racial Attitudes in Nineteenth-Century South Africa - R.L. Watson - 2012

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 23, 2013 4:37 am

FREDRIK DAVID WALDEK

30,31, Heerengracht, later, 30, Adderley Street, later, 30 St.George’s-street, Cape Town (Heerengracht was renamed Adderley Street c.1852)

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Fredrik Waldek is thought to have been born at the Cape in 1808, the son of Johannes and Dorothea Waldek. His working period was c.1830-c.1877.


Mr. F. WALDEK begs to inform the public that he has commenced business on his own account at the Old Established House of Messrs. L.TWENTYMAN & Co, No.30 Heeregracht, where he will continue to have on sale a selected variety of the best and most fashionable London-made Jewellery, Gold and Silver Watches, Plate and Plated Ware, at the very lowest prices.
15th March 1837.


Source: South African Commercial Advertiser - 18th March 1837



REMOVAL
Fred. WALDEK
Chronometer, Watch and Clockmaker, Gold and Silversmith
To No.31 Heerengracht (Adderley-street), corner house, opposite the Public Offices and entrance to Government Gardens
January 3rd 1853


Source: South African Commercial Advertiser - 8th January 1853



REMOVAL
Fred’k WALDEK from 30 Adderley-street to 30 St.George’s-street, next to the South African Bank.
Just Received, a large assortment of new style London-made Jewellery, Gold and Silver Watches, Clocks &c, best plated and German Silver Ware.


Source: South African Commercial Advertiser - 26th January 1856


Examples of the work of Fredrik Waldek:

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Two pairs of heavy fiddle pattern tongs (14 and 15cm).


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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 25, 2013 8:19 am

W. EDWARD DREGE

Market Square, later, 9, St.George’s Street, Cape Town

W. Edward DREGE, Market-square
Has just unpacked, and for sale, a splendid investment of London made and warranted gold and silver chronometers and watches, with richly embossed and engine-turned double-bottomed hunting cases, capped and jewelled, hand to mark the seconds, on patent detached lever, horizontal and other most approved principles, maintaining power &c.
These watches will be sold at the lowest rate possible.


Source: South African Commercial Advertiser - 8th February 1832



The Undersigned having, during his absence from this Colony, visited the principal Chronometer and Watch Manufactories of England, France and Switzerland, as well as for new Connections, as to make himself familiar with the latest improvements in his Business, takes the liberty of acquainting his Friends and Customers, as well as the Public in general, that he has re-opened his shop at No.9 St.George’s-street, where he receives Orders for repairing and rating Chronometers, Watches and Clocks, by Transit Observations; and offers for sale all kinds of superior Gold and Silver Lever, Cylinder, Duplex and Ancre Watches, jewelled in eight and ten holes, compound Balance &c, Clocks, Musical Boxes, from 2 to 8 Tunes, in rose-wood Cases, of the newest improvements and fashion, at the very lowest prices; and hopes, by paying the strictest attention to his Business, to merit a share of the public favor.
Edward DREGE


Source: South African Commercial Advertiser - 11th September 1839

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 26, 2013 10:56 am

PETER CLARKE DANIEL

5 Keizersgracht, Cape Town

P.C. DANIEL
Watchmaker and Jeweller
No.5 Keizersgracht, Corner of Grave-street
Begs to inform his friends and the public that the strictest attention is paid to all Articles in the above Line entrusted to his care, either in being made or repaired. He also begs to state that in addition to his former Stock, he has received by the Madras from London a very handsome investment, consisting of fine Gold Earrings, Brooches; Diamond, Pearl and Enamel Rings, Lockets, Crosses, Studs, Gentlemen’s Gold and Silver Guard Chains, Gold and Silver Patent Pencils, and a variety of other Articles, all of the latest fashion and very best quality.


Source: South African Commercial Advertiser - 17th May 1837

Peter Clarke Daniel was one of the early settlers at the the Cape Colony. Encouraged by the British Government's offer of, amongst other things, free land, he arrived at the Cape in June 1820, he was aged 44 years and described as a Jeweller. Settlers left Britain in organised groups, Peter Daniel's group was led by his brother-in-law, Edward Ford Turvey, a Drawing Master of 32 Southampton Road, Strand, London.

Peter Daniel's immediate family that accompanied him were, his wife Eliza, aged 38 years, and his children, Peter aged 15 years, Isabella aged 14 years, Thomas aged 9 years, Sampson aged 7 years, Eliza 4 years, Ann 2 years, and Frederick aged 1 year. Peter Daniel's brother and his family were also part of the group. Sampson Daniel was also described as a Jeweller, aged 32 years, his family consisted of his wife, Mary aged 27 years, and his children, Sophia 6 years, Eliza 5 years, Amelia 3 years, Robert 1 year, and Isabella, who was born during the voyage. Also listed were John Daniel, a 19 year old Jeweller, who was very likely Peter Daniel's son, but because of his age had to be listed separately (all settlers aged 18 years or older had to pay a deposit of £5). Another member of the party that was likely known to the Daniels' was Henry Holland, a 26 year old Gemcutter.

The party embarked at Deptford on the Sir George Osborn which sailed from the Downs on 16th March 1820, reaching Simon's Bay on the 17th June 1820. They reached Algoa Bay early in July, having been allotted land near to Trompetter's Drift Post, Albany. Peter Daniel named his farm 'Beggar's Bush'.

Peter Clarke Daniel was born in 1777 at Dublin, he was recorded as having four wives and twenty children. He died on the 21st May 1852 at Grahamstown, the cause of death being noted as measles.

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 27, 2013 9:21 am

SAMPSON O'MALIA DANIEL

Bloemfontein

Details of Sampson Daniel's arrival at the Cape Colony can be found in his elder brother's (Peter Clarke Daniel) post above.

Sampson Daniel was likely born in Ireland in 1788, the son of John Daniel and Elizabeth Clarke. As a youth he travelled to Scotland, and there met Amelia D'Egville who had been born at Lyon, France in 1791. Intent on marriage, Sampson was aged 17 years, but Amelia only aged 14 years, they eloped and were married at Gretna Green. They were later recorded as having ten children.

After his arrival at the Cape, he was recorded at Uitenhage, before relocating to Bloemfontein, where he was known to have been in business as a Jeweller and the owner of two farms, known as Glen Lyon and Floradale.

Sampson O'Malia Daniel died at Rouxville on the 18th January 1872. His wife, Amelia, predeceased him having died at Rouxville on the 16th May 1868.

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 28, 2013 2:53 pm

W. KARSTEL

23 Buitengracht, later,30 Strand Street, Cape Town

The undersigned begs most respectfully to announce to his Friends and the Public that he has removed from No.23 Buitengracht to No.30 Strand-street, opposite the Lutheran Church.
W. KARSTEL, Watchmaker.


Source: South African Commercial Advertiser - 25th April 1829

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 04, 2013 5:49 am

WILLEM GODFRIED LOTTER (II)

6, Kerk Street, Cape Town

Willem Godfried Lotter (II) was born in 1780 and died in 1855. His working period is thought to be c.1810 until c.1835.

Willem Godfried Lotter (II) was the son of the Cape silversmith Willem Godfried Lotter (I) (1748—1810) and the grandson of the silversmith Matthias Lotter (b. Augsburg, c.1700 - d.Cape Town, 25th December 1751). Willem Godfried Lotter (II) was the nephew of the silversmith Johannes Casparus Lotter (b.1737). In all, twelve members of the Lotter family known to have produced silver.


19th December 1826. His Majesty's Fiscal versus (1) Joseph, Slave of A. T. Neser ; (2) Gert, Slave of the Widow Daniel Haupt; (3) Christiaan, Slave of C. A. Haupt; (4) Alexander, Slave of W. Lotter; Joseph, assisted by Christiaan, for stealing six silver table spoons from Mr. Neser ; Gert, for instigating these two boys to commit the theft; and Alexander (who is by trade a silversmith), for purchasing the property much under its value, and knowing it to have been stolen.
Result: The facts charged were fully proved, and His Majesty's Fiscal claimed that Gert and Alexander be publicly scourged, and work six months in irons ; and that Joseph and Christiaan be scourged in the prison and returned to their masters. The Guardian submitted to the Court that Joseph was only fourteen and a half years old, and Christiaan not quite fourteen years, and that they had been instigated by others to commit the theft ; he prayed the Court therefore to take into consideration the youth of the two prisoners, and hoped that the confinement already suffered by them would be deemed a sufficient punishment. The Court confirmed the Fiscal's claim against Alexander, and sentenced Gert to be scourged and returned to his master, and the two boys, Joseph and Christiaan, as recommended by the Guardian, were released without further punishment.


Source: Records of the Cape Colony from February 1793 - Volumes 1-35


Examples of the marks of Willem Gotfried Lotter, it is thought possible that same marks were used by father and son:

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 06, 2013 6:42 am

COLLINS BROTHERS

55, Pritchard Street, Johannesburg

To update the two earlier posts regarding Collins Brothers:

Collins Brothers entered a mark 'C.BROS' contained within an oblong punch, with the Chester Assay Office on the 18th June 1904.

SIDNEY NAPOLEON CROMWELL COLLINS, ERNEST ALBERT EDWARD COLLINS, and LOUIS BONAPARTE COLLINS, trading as COLLINS BROTHERS. 55, Pritchard Street, Johannesburg, and 69, Myddelton Square, London EC. H. COLLINS as Attorney and Agent, 55, 56, Pritchard Street, Johannesburg, South Africa.

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun May 26, 2013 3:22 pm

J.P. GILLINGS

Cathcart, Eastern Cape

NOTICE
J.P.GILLINGS begs to inform the public that he intends to leave Cathcart at the end of June. J.P.G. asks his friends and customers who have any repairs &c to bring hem and have them seen to while they wait in town. JPG has on hand all stock of watches, jewellery &c which he is now selling at under cost prices to clear; inspection invited. All accounts must be paid by the 10th June otherwise they will be handed over for collection without further notice. All repairs left with JPG must be called for by June 20th 1889 or they will be sold on the next sale to defray expenses.

FOR SALE J.P.GILLING’s well known pony “Midnight”, rising six years guaranteed sound.


Source: The Farmer's Chronicle - 23rd May 1889

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 07, 2013 1:36 pm

CARMICHAEL & EVANS

127, Longmarket Street, Cape Town

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Carmichael & Evans box detail c.1920's - 1930's.

The business of Peter Stirling Carmichael.

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 20, 2013 11:18 am

GODFRIED FREDRIK SCHMITZDORFF

Cape Town

The mark of Godfried Fredrik Schmitzdorff:

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Godfried Fredrik Schmitzdorff was born at the Cape in 1777 (bapt. 19.10.1777), the son of German immigrants, his father being Godfried Schmitzdorff. He died in 1808.

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Jul 08, 2013 5:04 am

REUTELER MFG

Salisbury, Rhodesia - Harare, Zimbabwe


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Werner Reuteler was born at Bern, Switzerland in 1942. He trained as an Engineer and emigrated to Zimbabwe in 1964 and later formed his own company, Reuteler MFG. Reuteler MFG were die stampers and medallists and were the manufacturer of die struck insignia to the Rhodesian miltary, those of it issued to officers were made in silver. Their products were marked 'Reuteler MFG Rhodesia' or 'Reuteler MFG Salisbury', they were not marked with any indicator that they were silver.

The last found address for the business was in the 1990's, when they were styled 'REUTELER MANUFACTURING (PVT) LTD.', Msasa, Harare, Zimbabwe.

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Jul 09, 2013 4:01 pm

INDUSTRIAL METAL PRODUCTS

Salisbury, Rhodesia - Harare, Zimbabwe



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Clown's head - IMP - SAZ mark - H1

Manufacturer of silverplated products.

Formerly owned by the Anglo American Corporation from c.1965 until c.1985. The business was then acquired by Copperwares (PVT) Ltd., Harare, Zimbabwe.

The third mark from the left is the mark of The Standards Association of Zimbabwe (SAZ), it was formed in 1957 and incorporated in 1960 as the Standards Association of Rhodesia and Nyasaland (SARN) ans is the national standards body (NSB) of Zimbabwe.


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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Jul 11, 2013 5:30 am

KEAYS

First Street, Salisbury, Rhodesia


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Keays - Salisbury - 1950

Keays were still in business in the 1970's at least.

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Jul 12, 2013 8:15 am

H.G. BELL

First Street, Salisbury, and Umtali, Rhodesia

In business during the 1920's to 1950's at least.

The business of H.G. Bell's biggest claim to fame was the design of the famous 'Flame Lily brooch' presented to the then Princess Elizabeth on her 21st Birthday. The brooch was the gift of the children of Rhodesia, and some 42,000 of them contributed 3d. each towards the gift. The brooch, which was created in the shape of the flame lily Gloriosa Superba, the national flower of Rhodesia, was made of platinum set with 300 diamonds. It was designed by Len Bell of H.G. Bell and the work executed by Cartier trained jeweller Eric H.S. Kippin (1912-1998) at Sidersky & Son in Johannesburg. The brooch was presented to the Princess during her parents' tour of Southern Africa in 1947. It was probably most famously worn when she alighted from the aircraft upon her return from Kenya following the death of her father King George VI, the first time she stepped on British soil as monarch after her flight home in February 1952.


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Eric Kippin later made a further two copies of the brooch that were given to Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, and to Princess Margaret at Bulawayo, on Queen Elizabeth's first Commonwealth tour as Queen Mother in June 1953.

H.G. Bell were the appointed Rolex dealers in Salisbury during the 1930's.

H.G. Bell Ltd. were noted as being customers of Deakin & Francis in 1949.

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Jul 14, 2013 10:18 am

COPPERWARES (PVT) Ltd.

24, Neill Avenue, Msasa, Harare, Zimbabwe


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Established in 1960, and since 2000 the business has been in the hands of Bruce and Nicola Johnson.


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CW = Copperwares - A1 (Standard mark) - The Standards Association of Zimbabwe (SAZ) mark - SPC = Silver Plated Copper

Their brands today are Windsor Silverware, Royal African, Hannon's, and Gastone.


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One of their former brands was a silver plated on copper line 'Royal Sable':


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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Jul 16, 2013 8:07 am

M. BASCH & Co.

Seventh Street, Bulawayo, Rhodesia

Established by Maurice Basch.

An early advertisent stated: M. Basch & Co., “from Cheapside, London E.C.” “Chronometer, Watch and Clockmakers, Court Jewelers and Opticians. By Appointment of the Indian Government. Market Square, near the Maxim Hotel, Bulawayo”.

Emanuel Basch was a jeweller in England. Around 1897 he arrived in Rhodesia to take over his brother's business. Emanuel was a native of Plymouth, Devon, and noted as being the son of Edward Basch.

Emanuel Basch was an prominent member of the Jewish community there and was President of the Hebrew Congregation and the Hebrew Benevolent Society. He was a member of the Chamber of Mines and the Chamber of Commerce, and elected to a seat in the Town Council.

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Jul 17, 2013 3:24 am

MAX HAUPT

Bulawayo, Rhodesia

Noted as a Jeweller in Bulawayo c.1895.

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