Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

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Some Birmingham Trade Cards and Advertisements

Postby dognose » Tue Dec 23, 2008 4:45 pm

Hi,

Here are some Birmingham trade cards that appeared in 'Wrightson's New Triennial Directory of Birmingham' By Robert Wrightson. Published in 1818.

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Brown and Hardman. Britannia Metal Manufacturers. Paradise Street

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James & Gibbs. Platers. 6, Newhall Street.


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John Ottley. Wholesale Jeweller. Snowhill



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William Ryland & Sons, manufacturers of plated and brass coach harness and saddlery furniture, and other fancy articles, plated on steel. Temple street



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William Spooner & Co. Manufacturers of Plated Articles. New Market Street



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William Thompson & Co. Coffin Furniture and Britannia Metal Manufacturers, Great Brooke Street



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Waterhouse and Ryland. Manufacturers of Sheffield Plated wares. Hill Street





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Field & Hall. Coach and Saddlery Platers. Mary Ann Street


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Taylors and Perry. Gold and Silversmiths, jewellers, tortoiseshell and ivory box makers, and cut glass manufacturers, Newhall Street .

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Taylors and Perry. Gold and Silversmiths, jewellers, tortoiseshell and ivory box makers, and cut glass manufacturers, Newhall Street .

Trev.
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Postby dognose » Mon Mar 30, 2009 6:10 am

Some more advertisments from Birmingham manufacturers this time from 'Pigot and Co.'s National Commercial Directory of the Whole of Scotland', and of the Isle of Man.
By James Pigot & Co.
Published 1837.

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John Godfrey, 93, Coleshill Street, Birmingham.


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Job Winchurst, 44, Newhall Street, Birmingham. Job Winchurst entered his mark at the Birmingham Assay Office on the 8th January 1834.

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M. Kettle, 97,98,99, Suffolk Street, Birmingham.

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Samuel Clark, 53, Great Hampton Street, Birmingham. Samuel Clark moved to this address as from the 31st August 1836, he formerly had his workshop at 78, Summer Lane, Birmingham. He entered his mark at the Birmingham Assay Office on the 9th September 1834. He died c.1842. Samuel Clark's widow, Sarah, continued with the business and entered her name at the assay office on the 8th May 1842 using the same mark and address.

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James Allport, 12, Weaman Row, St Mary's Square, Birmingham.

Trev.
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Postby dognose » Sat Apr 25, 2009 9:25 am

The last post finished with James Allport, so we'll start this one with him again. This time from 1838.

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James Allport.

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Thomas Waterhouse and Thomas Parker entered their mark at the Birmingham Assay Office on the 24th August 1836. Their mark 'W&P' is very easily confused with a similar one entered by the partnership of Job Winchurst and John Pritchard on the 24th March 1830, the partnerships, however, do not overlap, so an accompanying date mark will reveal the maker.

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This is John Pritchard metioned above, he entered his mark, 'JP', at the Birmingham Assay Office on the 8th January 1834, presumably following the dissolution of his partnership with Job Winchurst. The address on entry was 87, Caroline Street, Birmingham, so we can see by 1838 he had moved a little further down the street to No. 79.

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This would be Matthew Dixon, he entered his mark, 'MD', at the Birmingham Assay Office on the 29th November 1815.

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Edmund Heeley & Co.


Source: Osborne's Guide to the Grand Junction, or Birmingham, Liverpool, and Manchester Railway.
By W. Osborne
Published by E.C. & W.Osborne, 1838


Trev.
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Postby dognose » Sat May 02, 2009 2:15 pm

Some more Birmingham silversmiths advertisments from 1838.


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John Ducker, dealer in Regulus, that is, Regulus of Antimony, when alloyed with other metals it hardens them, and is used in the manufacture of alloys, such as Britannia-metal and pewter. It also makes bells sound clearer and renders tin more white.

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Gideon Goold, Sealmaker.

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Onion & Son. Birmingham, London and Liverpool.

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John Morton.

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R. W. Child.

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Thomas Horton & Co.

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Josiah Hickman.

Source: Osborne's Guide to the Grand Junction, or Birmingham, Liverpool, and Manchester Railway.
By W. Osborne
Published by E.C. & W.Osborne, 1838


Trev.
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Postby MCB » Mon May 04, 2009 7:57 am

Hello All,

For those of us interested in makers' marks these extracts of trade advertisements are very useful in showing the period over which silversmiths worked. Often the only information available is the registration of a mark with the Assay Office.

An example above is the case of William Ryland & Sons. My only prior record of these silversmiths was registration of a mark in 1800. It is now seen that the firm was still trading and presumably using the registered mark for a further 18 years. This of course means that in practical terms, had another maker registered a similar mark in the extended period now known, attribution of a piece of silver in the period would become more problematical. Happily this wasn't the case here but does serve to highlight a situation which can cause debate as to whom, in fact, put an item to assay.

For those interested in authorised marks the following can be added to those identified above:
William Rylands & Son registered "WR" in a rectangle 1800
William Spooner registered "WS" in a rectangle 1815
Waterhouse & Ryland registered "W&R" in a rectangle 1810
(John) Taylor & (John) Perry registered "T&P" in a rectangle 1826

Keep up the good work Trev!

Mike
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Postby dognose » Fri May 08, 2009 4:24 pm

Some Birmingham jewellers adverts from 1838

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Postby dognose » Mon Jul 13, 2009 1:03 pm

Advertisment for Thomas Prime from 1849.

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Thomas Prime registered two marks with the Birmingham Assay Office, the first 'TP' within an oblong on the 19th October 1846, address entered as 18, Northwood Street, Birmingham, the second 'TP' within an oval with a point from the underside, was entered on the 29th November 1849 with the same address used. For both entries he gave his trade as 'Plater & Silversmith'.

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Postby dognose » Thu Aug 06, 2009 5:20 am

WILLIAM SPURRIER

5, Newhall Street, Birmingham

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William Spurrier - Birmingham - 1853

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William Spurrier - Birmingham - 1861

William Spurrier was an exhibitor at the Great Exhibition of 1851 and at the International Exhibition of 1862. They were established in 1844.

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Postby dognose » Thu Sep 17, 2009 5:32 pm

A couple of famous names featuring in advertisments from 1880.

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William Hair Haseler entered his mark at the Birmingham Assay Office on the 9th of May 1850 using the address 73 1/2 Caroline Street, Birmingham. By 1880, as can be seen, he had moved to new premises at Vyse Street.
W H Haseler produced much of the 'Cymric' ware for Liberty's, where his two sons, William Rabone Haseler and Frank Haseler were directors.
A former apprentice of Thomas Perry Bragg, William Hair Haseler died on the 11th of October 1909.

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George Unite & Sons - Birmingham - 1863

Fomerly in partnership with James Hilliard, George Unite entered his first mark alone, at Birmingham on the 8th August 1832 using the address 42, Caroline Street, Birmingham.
A former apprentice of Joseph Willmore, George Unite died on the 19th October 1896.
The business of George Unite & Sons amalgamated with that of William Henry Lyde in 1928 and was known as George Unite Sons & Lyde Ltd.

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Postby dognose » Fri Oct 16, 2009 5:35 am

JOHN YATES & SONS

56, Pritchett Street, Birmingham

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John Yates & Sons - Birmingham - 1861

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Postby dognose » Mon Dec 07, 2009 2:49 pm

HENRY J. MANTON

Union Works, 108-110, Great Charles Street, Birmingham

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Henry J. Manton - Birmingham - 1878

This is Henry John Manton, the son of Henry Manton. Henry senior entered his first mark at the Birmingham Assay Office on the 14th March 1832 and was a partner in the firm of Manton & Mole. Henry junior ran this side of the business and was an exhibitor at the 1862 International Exhibition. Henry John Manton died on the 12th October 1924, aged 89 years.

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Postby dognose » Mon Mar 29, 2010 6:00 am

EDWARD J. ADAMS

34, St Paul's Square, Birmingham

An advertisement for Edward J. Adams of 34, St Paul's Square, Birmingham that appeared in 'The Australian Handbook' of 1888.

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Edward J. Adams - Birmingham - 1888

He is perhaps to be identified with Edward Adams who registered an 'EA' mark at the Birmingham Assay Office on the 25th February 1846 from an address in Sand Pitts, Birmingham and entering his trade as a Jeweller.

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Postby MCB » Mon Mar 29, 2010 12:20 pm

Hello Trev,

A candidate for the other topic in Contributor’s Notes identifying registered makers with unusual trade association is Edward Adams born c1811 who, prior to his registering in 1846 as a jeweller, is on the 1841 Census as a butcher in Sand Pitts. He said he was in the jewellery business in each Census from 1851-1891 apart from 1871 when, for some reason, he is recorded as a retired goldsmith. From time to time he also gave his name as Edward J Adams. He died in 1890.
He had a son Edward J Adams born c1837 who is recorded in the 1851 Census as a jewellery boy and between 1861 and 1901, the last Census available to me, to be in the jewellery business.
He had a son (guess who) Edward J Adams born c1864 who was also in the jewellery business until at least 1881. After that isn’t clear where he was or what he did.
It seems therefore that the Edward J Adams in the 1888 advertisement was probably EJA II.

Regards,
Mike
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Postby dognose » Mon Mar 29, 2010 1:37 pm

Hi Mike,

Excellent stuff, and what an extraordinary change of profession!

Regards Trev.
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Postby dognose » Sun May 30, 2010 12:08 pm

JOHN READING

6, Spencer Street, Birmingham

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John Reading - Birmingham - 1870

John Reading entered his first mark (J.R) at the Birmingham Assay Office on the 26th June 1856 from 83, Spencer Street. From the same address on the 13th April 1864 he entered his second mark, an unusual 'J.R.Patent'.

As we can see from the above advertisement, he appears to have moved to new premises in Spencer Street sometime between 1864 - 1870.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards

Postby dognose » Thu Jul 08, 2010 2:20 pm

JAMES TWIST

5, Newhall Street, Birmingham

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James Twist - Birmingham - 1808

Best strong plated wares with silver edges - Warranted

Wrightson's Triennial Directory of 1818 has an Elizabeth Twist of New Hall Street as a silver plater, presumably she may be the widow or daughter of James Twist.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards

Postby dognose » Mon Jul 12, 2010 9:33 am

THOMAS WILKINSON & Co.

15, Great Hampton Street, Birmingham

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T. Wilkinson & Co. - Birmingham - 1861

Thomas Wilkinson & Co. were formed in 1832 by Thomas Wilkinson, James Shaw and Charles Shaw. Thomas Wilkinson served in the army during the Napoleonic wars and was demobilised whilst stationed at Sheffield. Following his discharge he trained as a silversmith and silver plater. His move to Birmingham was at an unknown date, but in 1832 he opened his works at 15, Great Hampton Street.

They entered their first marks with the Birmingham Assay Office, T W & Co in an oblong with clipped corners and T.W. & Co without ontline, on the 1st July 1835 under the names of Thomas Wilkinson and James Shaw. They later also recorded marks at the London Assay Office.

In 1846 James and Charles Shaw left the partnership and were replaced by Thomas's sons, George and William Henry. Around this period they obtained the licence to use the Elkington Patent method for silver plating. London showrooms were also opened at this time at 41, Tavistock Street, Covent Garden. In 1868 they moved into a new factory, the Pelican Works, 45-46 Great Hampton Street, Birmingham, this was to remain their home until the 1930's.

Thomas Wilkinson died on the 19th September 1874 and following that, the firm became known as Thomas Wilkinson & Sons. George Wilkinson retired in 1888 and William Henry was joined by his sons, William Arthur and Francis Isaac.

In 1897 their London showrooms were listed at 16, Holborn Viaduct EC, and in c.1906 at 13, Basinghall Street EC.

Thomas Wilkinson & Sons was sold in 1932 to A.L. Davenport Ltd. and continued in business until 1972.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards

Postby dognose » Tue Jul 13, 2010 1:54 pm

DERRY & JONES

55, Great Hampton Street, Birmingham

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Derry & Jones - Birmingham - 1853

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Derry & Jones - Birmingham - 1861

The original company, John Sheldon, later John Sheldon & Co. can be traced back to 1824. They became Derry & Jones in 1860, the partners being Frederick Derry and Henry Jones and were exhibitors at the International Exhibition of 1862. The partnership, however was to be short lived, and they parted company in 1866.

Henry Jones retained the manufactory at 55, Great Hampton Street, Birmingham, renaming the business Henry Jones & Co. Frederick Derry, meanwhile stated up his company at 31-32 Upper Hockley Street, Birmingham, naming the factory The Phoenix Electro-Plate and Spanish Silver Works.

Frederick Derry exhibited at the Industries Exhibition at Birmingham in 1886, he died in 1891.

Derry & Jones entered marks at the Birmingham Assay Office. A 'D&J' without outline was entered in March 1860, a 'D' (circle) '&' (diamond) 'J' (circle) was entered in January 1861 and a similar mark was entered in May 1863.

Frederick Derry entered marks at the Birmingham Assay Office. 'F.D' contained in an oblong punch with clipped corners in September 1867.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards

Postby dognose » Fri Jul 16, 2010 2:18 pm

The Trade Mark of Frederick Derry. (See above post)

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Frederick Derry was the manager at John Sheldon & Co for twenty-one years.

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Re: Some Birmingham Trade Cards

Postby dognose » Sun Jul 18, 2010 11:50 am

HUBERT HALL

6, Augusta Street, Birmingham

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Hubert Hall - Birmingham - 1861

Hubert(sometimes Herbert) Hall, entered his first mark at the Birmingham Assay Office on the 21st June 1855 from 2, St George's Place, Great Hampton Row, Birmingham. On the 5th May 1856 he moved to 122, Pritchard Street and from that address, on the 11th August 1856, he entered marks that record the partnership of himself and Joseph Hall. The partnership appears very short lived, as on the 27th August 1857 he again entered solo marks, again from the Pritchard Street address. As can be seen from the above advertisement, by 1861 he had moved to 6, Augusta Street.

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Hubert Hall - Birmingham - 1863

The firm also entered marks at the Chester Assay Office on the 13th May 1920 from 223a Great King Street, Birmingham. They were later to move to 107 Unett Street, Birmingham.

The practice of Birmingham makers registering their marks at the Chester Assay Office was a common one. Birmingham had for years suffered a reputation for producing goods of an inferior quality, the appearence of the Chester mark on their work was an early marketting ploy to give their goods a more up-market image. It was estimated some 2,000 marks entered at Chester came from Birmingham addresses.

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