Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

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Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 25, 2012 8:48 am

SUGUNCHUND & SOBHAGCHUND

Johory Bazar, Jaipur

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Sugunchund & Sobhagchund - Jaipur - 1903


Noted as an exhibitor at the Delhi Exhibition of 1902-1903.

Sugunchand Sobhagchand, Jeweller and Dealer in all kinds of precious stone, Jaipur. - The special feature of this firm is their extensive transactions in gold enamelling. They have practically in fact absorbed the Jaipur enamelling craft and have all the best workmen in their employ. The principal articles exhibited by this firm are as follows :—

A cup set with large diamonds, emeralds, pearls, and rubies, R600,000. A gold belt set with large diamonds, R300,000. A diamond necklace, R300,000. A pair of bracelets set with large diamonds and rubies, R75,000. A pearl necklace, R125,000. A two row pearl necklace, R150,000. A two row emerald necklace, R75,000. A gold enamelled tea set, R10,000. A gold enamelled picture frame, R5,000. An enamelled bottle case, R3,000. A green diamond ring, R20,000. A large pearl aigrette, R25,000. Large pearls valued at R55,000. A large assortment of lockets, bangles, rings, etc., in gold enamel.


Source: Indian Art at Delhi - Being the Official Catalogue of the Delhi Exhibition, 1902-1903 - Sir George Watt Kt., CLE., M,B, CM., etc., - 1903

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver - inc. Indian Subcontinent Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 25, 2012 9:09 am

GULABCHUND LUNIA & Co.

Near Sangame Gate, Kundgarankarasta, Jaipur

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Gulabchund Lunia & Co. - Jaipur - 1903

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver - inc. Indian Subcontinent Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 25, 2012 10:58 am

GANESHI LALL (LAL) & SON

Johri Bazar, and later, 13, Drummond Road, Agra. - 7, The Esplanade, East Calcutta. - The Mall, Simla

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Ganeshi Lall & Son - Agra and Simla - 1903

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Ganeshi Lall & Son - Agra, Calcutta, and Simla - 1922


Noted as an exhibitor at the Delhi Exhibition of 1902-1903.

Ganeshi Lal and Son of Agra and Simla.—This firm have an extensive display of all classes of jewellery as also antique jade and crystal. The following may be accepted as denoting some of their more remarkable exhibits:-

A necklace of old emeralds, diamonds, and pearls, valued at R125,000. Necklace of old rubies, diamonds, and pearls, R6,000. Pendant of old emeralds weighing about 40 carats and diamonds converting it into a kalgi, R55,000. A pair of bracelets set with old rubies and diamonds, R40,000. A single diamond scarf pin, the diamond weighing 51 carats, R110,000. A very old and fine white jade cup with carved handle, R15,000. Very old gold enamelled hukka complete, R13,000.


Source: Indian Art at Delhi - Being the Official Catalogue of the Delhi Exhibition, 1902-1903 - Sir George Watt Kt., CLE., M,B, CM., etc., - 1903

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver - inc. Indian Subcontinent Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 25, 2012 1:47 pm

LABHCHAND MOTICHAND

Marble House, 41, Dhurrumtollah Street, Calcutta

Messrs. Labhchand Motichand, Mookims and Court Jewellers, Marble House, 41, Dhurrumtollah Street, Calcutta. This flourishing business was started by Messrs. Labh Chand Sett, grandson of the late Kalumal Sett, an influential Indian merchant and well-known banker in the mercantile community of Calcutta of his time, and Moti Chand Nakhat, son of the late Phool Chand, Mookim and Court Jeweller, a famous and honest jeweller in Bengal, and one of the most influential members of the Jain Community of Calcutta, some ten years ago.

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Labhchand Sett

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Motichand Sett

The partners' skill in their line of business, the excellence of their manufacture, and the quality of the precious stones and jewellery in which they dealt, soon obtained a wide reputation for the new firm, and for some eight years they carried on business at their old premises at Cotton Street with increasing success. So much so, that it became necessary to secure larger premises in a more suitable locality. Accordingly the "Marble House " in Dhurrumtollah was built purposely for the accommodation of the firm, which has since carried on business at that centre. Since the establishment of these premises a further great impetus has been given to the firm's business, which has attained very large proportions. The spacious factory, which is on the premises, and which has been brought thoroughly up-to-date with modern tools and appliances for the manufacture of jewellery and gold articles, has enabled the firm to improve even upon the excellent class of goods in which they previously dealt, and at present the manufactures of the firm are quite in the first rank. The firm gives employment to many first class artificers in the various branches of the goldsmith's and jeweller's art, and in all employs about 250 to 300 hands. The entire business is under the personal supervision of the partners, who are both highly experienced men in their trade. The firm makes a speciality of diamond cutting, and specimens of their work are always on view at the Show Rooms, to which the ground floor of the building with an excellent frontage is devoted. The entire facing of the building is of marble and of unique and striking design in the city. Although the business of Messrs. Labhchand Motichand is carried on in quite first class surroundings, the prices of their jewellery, etc., are very moderate. This they are enabled to assure by the fact that they are manufacturing jewellers, and the public in dealing with them obtain their goods without middle profits. The firm made a very prominent exhibit at the Industrial Exhibition, at Calcutta, 1906-7, where they erected a beautiful stall at their own expense, the walls, being lined with mirrors which set off the excellent exhibits with great effect. This exhibit was a very successful proof that Indian artisans can produce jewellery in the modern style in competition with European workmen. To this end Messrs. Labhchand Motichand have established a free Technical School with the object of teaching the better class of the Indian people the art of manufacturing jewellery suited to modern requirements in the European and Indian styles. This was practically a necessity to the business as the men who profess the art as a caste profession, are unreliable in the extreme, and the firm has experienced considerable inconvenience owing to the delays occasioned by their irregular attendance. At the exhibition the firm also exhibited diamond cutting machines and other appliances as used in diamond cutting. The process of diamond cutting was shown in practice at the firm's stall and excited much interest among the Indian visitors, specially to H. M. the Amir of Afghanistan, to whom the art was practically unknown till introduced by Messrs. Labhchand Motichand. The Technical School does not confine its instruction entirely to the jeweller's art, though this is its main purpose. The curriculum includes English literature, Sanskrit, Hindi and Bengali. It is open to all Jains and Hindu youths, and provision is made for board and lodging for a certain number of Jain young men. The munificence of Messrs. Labhchand Motichand has rendered the advantages of the school available, free to all classes whom they invite. Babu Motichand Xakhat, the junior partner, has also benefited Calcutta by the establishment of a large Dharmsala or traveller's house at No. 9, Shama Bai's Lane, Bara Bazar, in memory of his father the late Lalla Phoolchand, who was in his time Mookim and Court Jeweller to H. E. the Viceroy. These premises cost about Rs. 60,000 and are quite up to modern requirements in ventilation and sanitation. They are intended for the use of Jains and Hindus. Messrs. Labhchand Motichand have received the honour of appointment as Mookims and Court Jewellers to H. E. the Earl of Minto, the Viceroy, and have also been appointed Jewellers to H. H. the Nizam of Hyderabad, H. H. the Maharaja Gaekwar of Baroda, H. H. the Maharaja of Mysore, H. H. the Maharaja of Cashmere, H. H. the Maharaja of Cooch Behar, Raja Sir Amar Singh, Commander-in-Chief of Cashmere, and H. H. the Maharaja of Benares, and are patronized by the chief noblemen and gentry of all the Provinces of India.


Source: The Cyclopedia of India: Biographical, Historical, Administrative, Commercial - Volume 2 - 1908

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver - inc. Indian Subcontinent Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 25, 2012 2:10 pm

J. C. BECHTLER SON & Co.

Allahabad, Lucknow and Mussoorie


J.C. BECHTLER, WATCHMAKER, begs to inform the Trade that he has started business on his own account under the name and style of J. C. BECHTLER and Co., Watchmakers, Jewellers, and Opticians, Allahabad, India.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 5th June 1885



Messrs. J. C. Bechtler Son & Co., Manufacturing Silversmiths, Jewellers, Watchmakers and Opticians, Allahabad, Lucknow and Mussoorie. This business was established in Allahabad by Mr. Jouquin Carl Bechtler, at first in a very small way, for the manufacture of jewellery and silverware, and was the first business of the kind to be established in India away from the Presidency towns. The business rapidly expanded, and in ten years' time had so far advanced that it was necessary to erect the present large and handsome premises with a frontage of 120 feet. The firm has attained a deservedly high reputation in the manufacture of rings and jewellery of all descriptions, challenge-cups, shields, medals, and all kinds of sporting prizes, masonic jewellery, etc. In the year 1887 Messrs. Bechtler Son & Co. were appointed jewellers and silversmiths to His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor of the United Provinces, and have held that patronage ever since. They carry large stocks of diamonds, rubies, pearls, and every kind of precious stone. For twenty-two years consecutively they have issued a yearly catalogue, showing all the novelties in their line at moderate prices. Mr. J. C. Bechtler is a native of Switzerland, and was apprenticed to the watchmaking trade in his native country. After completing his five years apprenticeship he travelled in France, Austria and Switzerland, perfecting himself in his trade. In 1880 he came to India where he has established himself with such success. He is an expert in all departments of his business. Mr. Bechtler is a member of the Switzerland Geographical Society and the publisher of a journal devoted to jewellery and precious stones, "The Diamond." The branch of the business of Messrs. Bechtler Son & Co. at Mussoorie was opened in 1889, and a large stock of assorted precious stones and jewellery is carried there. There is also a well-fitted workshop for manufacturing purposes. The firm take a great interest in sport, and contribute largely in the way of cups, shields, etc., for trophies.

Source: The Cyclopedia of India: Biographical, Historical, Administrative, Commercial - Volume 2 - 1908

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J.C. Bechtler & Co. - Allahabad - 1890's

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An image of the premises of J.C. Bechtler, Son & Co. at Allahabad, taken in 1908.


Messrs. J. C. Bechtler and Co., of Allahabad, India, have forwarded us a specimen of a medal they have designed and struck as a souvenir of the visit to India of Prince Albert Victor. The design of the memento is well conceived, and the workmanship leaves nothing to be desired, the parts in relievo being exceedingly clean and sharp. On the obverse is a capital portrait of the young Prince, and the reverse contains the raison d'etre of the medal, in an inscription, surmounted by the Prince of Wales' feathers and surrounded by sprays of (presumably) native flora, with a tiger at the base.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st March 1890

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 26, 2012 2:36 pm

COOKE & KELVEY

20, Old Court House Street, Calcutta

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Messrs. Cooke & Kelvey, Pearl and Diamond Merchants, Jewellers, Gold and Silver Art Workers, were established in 1859, and hold a leading position in the Indiam Metropolis. They have always been favoured with the highest patronage in India: appointed Jewellers to the Earl of Mayo, they have received this favour of appointment from every succeeding Governor-General and Viceroy down to the present day. Their beautifully appointed showroms are amongst the largest in the city, and must be seen to be apreciated. Unique in many resepts, they are an intersting sight that cannot fail to please the artistic visitor. Here are gathered together rare gems and gorgeous jewels of immense value collected from all parts of the world, and a carefully selected stock of modern jewellery of the most artistic designs can always be inspected. But not alone for their jewells has this firm become famed. Their splendid display of solid silver, testimonial plate, electroplate, clocks, watches, etc., stands unrivalled. A large manufacturing department in which every description of jewellery and silver work is executed, forms a special feature in this establishment, and the whole working plant being electrically driven enables them to turn out their orders expeditiously with exceptionally high finish and reduced cost. Among the interesting articles which have from time to time been designed and manufactured by this firm, are magnificently jewelled crowns, swords, belts, and other ornaments, silver bedsteads, howdahs, state chairs, challenge cups, shields, address caskets, all of which have been manufactured for some notable occasion, and special mention must be made of the caskets presented to His Majesty the King, when Prince of Wales, on his visit to Calcutta in 1875, and also to H. R. H. the Prince of Wales on his visit in December 1905.

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Tower clocks are also a speciality of this firm, and many fine examples of this work have been made and erected in various parts of India. Being contractors to Government they are large manufacturers of station and office clocks, of which they supply large numbers to the different Railways in this country. Racing chronograph and complicated watches are also a leading feature of their business. The chronograph watches used by the Calcutta Turf Club for timing all important races have been supplied by this firm for many years past.

Source: The Cyclopedia of India: Biographical, Historical, Administrative, Commercial - Volume 1 - 1907

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Cooke & Kelvey - Calcutta - 1881

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Cooke & Kelvey - Calcutta - 1893......................................Cooke & Kelvey - Calcutta - 1882

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Cooke & Kelvey - Calcutta - Simla - 1896

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Cooke & Kelvey - Calcutta - Simla - Lahore - 1904


Example of the mark of Cooke & Kelvey:

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See: http://www.925-1000.com/AngloIndian_01.html

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 27, 2012 2:20 pm

T.R. TAWKER & SONS

Mount Road, Madras

Mr. T. Gopinatha Tawker is the chief partner in the Firm of Tawker & Sons, Jewellers and Merchants in precious stones, of Indian and continental fame.

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The Tawkers of Madras, who are the descendants of the State jewellers to the famous Mahratta Ruler, Sivaji, and his successors, came to Southern India at their royal patron's command, and settled at Tanjore when Sivaji's supremacy was established over that kingdom in the 17th century. Of a noble family, the Tawkers would appear to have been originally jewellers to the Royal house alone, in the spirit of exclusion which usually characterised families of distinction. Just before and after the decline and fall of the royal family of Tanjore, the Tawkers extended the scope of their transactions to others less highly placed in the social scale, and their business expanded so rapidly that the royal jewellers established their reputation as merchants in precious stones in Madras (whither they had turned their attention), even as far back as fifty years ago. The family business was being carried on in an unostentatious manner by Mr. Ranganatha Tawker, Mr. Gopinatha Tawker's father, at his residence in Sowcarpet. The demand for increased efficiency to cope with the increasing business relations led to a change of career in Mr. Gopinatha Tawker's life. Born in 1862, and with a brilliant scholastic career before him, Mr. Gopinatha Tawker was called upon to determine, whether he would prosecute his studies in the College department, having brilliantly matriculated at an early age, or join his ancestral profession of jewellers and diamond merchants. It was then that the prejudices of the time that held that trade in any form could not command respect, battled within Mr. Gopinatha Tawker's young mind for mastery over the accumulated experiences of ages in his family. The pliability of mind at that early age, coupled with the habit of implicit obedience shown to his father at all times, decided the issue in favour of his father's calling. Early in his career as a jeweller he came under the influence of H. H. the late Maharajah of Vizianagram, popularly known as "the charming Prince of India." The Maharajah's patronage gave an impetus to Mr. Gopinatha Tawker's business talents, and at the Maharajah's suggestion he undertook the arduous task of touring through India in search of precious stones of historical antiquity. So successful was he, that a collection of these w'hich for rarity, antiquarian worth, and historical associations, is really unique, now adorns the showroom at his palatial business premises at Mount Road, Madras; a collection that attracts universal attention and draws unstinted praise from Continental princes and nobility. Mr. Gopinatha Tawker gave special impetus to the Art Department, and developed and improved upon the old methods and models to suit modern taste to such an extent, that when his collection was exhibited at the Delhi Durbar, Sir George Watt described the exhibits as a "superb display." When, at His Majesty's Coronation, his artistic wares and priceless stones of unusual size and brilliance were on view, the Royal Family and the nobility gave unsolicited testimonials in glowing terms.

A special feature of Mr. Gopinatha Tawker's method of business is bold speculation, tempered by prudence and based on a calculation of chances. Lakhs of rupees worth of jewellery have been sent at considerable risk to Cabul, the seat of H. M. the Amir, with highly gratifying results. Continental merchants import his wares and precious stones in large quantities; an unfailing sign of their intrinsic worth and of the appreciation that they command.

Mr. GopinathaTawker encourages his brother traders with substantial help, and sometimes with valuable advice. Among his patrons are :— His Majesty the Amir of Afghanistan, H. H. the Shah of Persia, H. H. the Nizam of Hyderabad Their Highnesses the Maharajah* of Mysore, Baroda. Travancore, Patiala, Jodhpur, Jaipur, Dholpur, Benares, and Vizianagram. In Architecture, of which he has made a special study, Mr. Tawker has given ample proof of his ability in design and scientitic execution, in his three palatial buildings, two on the Mount Road, occupied by his firm, and that of Messrs. Whiteaway. Laidlaw & Co., respectively, and one at Royapettah, all of which have considerably added to the beauty of the city.

Another subject to which Mr. Gopinatha Tawker has now successfully turned his attention is agriculture. He has been, at considerable cost, experimenting on his valuable properties with a view to discover the advantages of the employment of modern implements of agriculture, and to give his experience to the cultivating classes. His scientifically cultivated farm near Red Hills, which was visited by H. E. the Governor and other important Government officials, bears ample evidence of the labour and thought bestowed on all concerns undertaken by him Mr. Gopinatha Tawker is able to devote some of his time to industries other than the jeweller's business, as he is assisted by his two brothers, the second of whom is well known in Southern India as an expert connoisseur of gems. Mr. Gopinatha Tawker has become rich by his untiring industry, patient application, and careful system, and has advanced the indigenous jewellery trade in its artistic branch to a very great extent.


Source: The Cyclopedia of India: Biographical, Historical, Administrative, Commercial - Volume 2 - 1908


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T.R. Tawker & Sons - Madras - 1900


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T.R. Tawker & Sons - Madras - 1901


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T.R. Tawker & Sons - Madras - 1903

Noted as an exhibitor at the Delhi Exhibition of 1902-1903.

Messrs. T. R. Tawker and Sons of Mount Road, Madras. —This firm having secured the whole of the western extremity of the gallery have a superb display. They are manufacturing jewellers and silver-smiths who pay special attention to the subject of Indian jewellery. Their collection of exhibits, which includes some jewels of great intrinsic value, claims additional merit by the fact that several pieces are of historic interest. Of these a large emerald, weighing upwards of 18 carats—a stone said to have been set in the signet ring of the Mughal Emperor Shah Alum. This gem which is of the rich emerald hue so much sought after, is a perfect specimen, and bears the name of the Delhi monarch and the date inscribed in Persian on its face. Another stone, a carved emerald contained in a necklace, is reputed to have originally found a place as one of the State jewels of the "Tiger of Mysore," Tippu Sultan. Several very fine ruby necklaces are shown, one being composed of stones of exceptional size and colour, that took the firm many years to bring together. A necklace of 42 grand emeralds has also taken much patience to collect, some of the gems having been obtained from the old family jewels belonging to the Tanjore Raj. Such are a few of the fine jewels exhibited by this firm and it may be added that their display has been valued at 860,00,000.

Source: Indian Art at Delhi - Being the Official Catalogue of the Delhi Exhibition, 1902-1903 - Sir George Watt Kt., CLE., M,B, CM., etc., - 1903


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Exhibition Photograph - 1903


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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 28, 2012 12:47 pm

DROZ, AMSTUTZ & Co.

Bombay and Calcutta

Messrs. Droz, Amstutz & Co. is one of the oldest and largest houses in India engaged in the importation of high-class watches and jewellery. The business was first established in Bombay in 1884 under the trade name, West End Watch Company, and it is under this designation that it is known to the general public throughout India as the seller of watches that bear its "West End" trade mark. The enormous sale of these watches is principally due to their suitability for use under the conditions peculiar to this country. The firm is also the proprietor of the "Popular," "Whitfield," and other special styles of watches specially adapted for the Indian market.

The firm is a very old established and well-known one in Switzerland, where it has a large factory engaged in the production of all kinds and styles of watches for export to all parts of the world.

Messrs. Droz, Amstutz & Co. deal principally in the watches of their own manufacture, but they also import all classes of Swiss watches, French and American clocks, etc. They have also recently added a special department for the importation of gold and silver jewellery of English and Continental manufacture, and have a very large and varied stock of articles of this description. They are also buyers of precious stones for export to Europe.
Owing to the great development of the business, the firm opened a branch in Calcutta a few years ago, where it carries on a similar business to that conducted in its Bombay establishment, the principal part of its sales in the Bengal Presidency and Burma being conducted by the Calcutta Office.


Source: The Cyclopedia of India: Biographical, Historical, Administrative, Commercial - Volume 2 - 1908

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 29, 2012 2:33 pm

O.L.M. MACAN MARKAR

4, Grand Oriental Hotel, Columbo

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O.L.M. Macan Markar - Colombo - 1903

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O.L.M. Macan Markar - Colombo - 1906

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1907

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 30, 2012 5:22 pm

DON THEODORIS & Co.

40, Chatham Street, Fort, Columbo


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Like so many other of the now flourishing business houses of Columbo, this of Don Theodoris & Co. has grown to its present eminence from small beginnings. It was founded at Galle, then the chief entrepot of the island, in 1865, by Mr. D.T. Weerasirie, who started in business as a dealer in tortoiseshell, curios, and jewellery. The headquarters of the business were removed to Columbo when that city became the port of call for Ceylon, though the establishment at Galle was retained; and with the new progress of the city rapid expansion proceeded, until at this day Messrs. Don Theodoris & Co. rank among the very first of local jewellers and dealers in precious stones, articles in tortoiseshell, ivory, sandalwood, and ebony, carved curiosities, bric-a-brac, articles of vertu, and ornamental ware of all kinds. There are at present five members of the firm, the managing partner being Don Hendrick Weerasirie; and at Galle and Columbo about 70 men are employed, all the workman being trained by the firm. For their exhits at the Paris Exhibition of 1900 the firm received a prize medal and diploma; and at the St. Louis Exhibition (United States) in 1904 they won silver medals, besides a diploma for ivory carving, a special feature of the exhibit being a huge elephant carved in ebony covered with beautiful hand-chiselled silver trappings and bearing a silver howdah containing a reproduction of the Sacred Tooth of Buddha. In 1901 the Prince of Wales and Prince Waldemar of Denmark, when visiting Ceylon, made large purchases of the firm, who received signed photographs from the royal visitors. The firm carries on a large business as working jewellers, cutting and polishing stones obtained by their own agents direct from the mines. They also export gems to England, Germany, and France, and import silver-ware from India, Burma, and China, and jewellery from England. A special branch of the trade of this house is dealing in Kandyan and Indian antiques, arms, coins, and other curios. The members of the firm are all followers of Buddha.

Source: Twentieth Century Impressions of Ceylon - Arnold Wright - 1907



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Don Theodoris & Co. - Columbo - 1903

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Don Theodoris & Co. - Columbo - 1904

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Don Theodoris & Co. - Columbo - 1905

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Don Theodoris & Co. - Columbo - 1906

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Don Theodoris & Co. - Columbo - 1907


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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Thu May 03, 2012 8:51 am

JELLICOE

2, Esplanade Row, Calcutta

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Jellicoe - Calcutta - 1881

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Thu May 03, 2012 2:26 pm

R. DILL & Co.

Allahabad

The Dill family originated from the jewellery manufacturing town of Pforzheim in Germany.

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An Image of the shopfront of R. Dill & Co., taken in 1908.

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Fri May 04, 2012 1:17 pm

D.F. De SILVA & Co.

42, and later, 7, Chatham Street, and 2, Grand Oriental Hotel, Columbo

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Conspicuous among the attractive jewellery establishments of Colombo are the showrooms at 7, Chatham Street, and 2, Grand Oriental Hotal Arcade, of D.F. de Silva & Co., jewellers and dealers of precious stones, working gold and silver smiths, tortoieshell, ivory and ebony carvers. The business, which has, in the course of years, attained a forefront position, was started in a small way in Columbo in 1870 by the late Devendera Frederick de Silva (who died in October, 1904), in partnership with Messrs. P.L. Don Juanis de Silva and W.A. Don Prolis, the present managing partners.

Source: Twentieth Century Impressions of Ceylon - Arnold Wright - 1907



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D.F. De Silva - Columbo - 1881

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D.F. De Silva - Columbo - 1903

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D.F. De Silva - Columbo - 1905

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D.F. De Silva - Columbo - 1907

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D.F. De Silva - Columbo - 1908

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Sat May 05, 2012 10:34 am

GHOSH & SONS

74, Harrison Road,and 16-1 Radha Bazar Street, Calcutta

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Ghosh and Sons - Calcutta - 1908

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Tue May 08, 2012 2:05 pm

D.F. WEERASIRIE & Co.

28, Ward Street, Kandy

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D.F. Weerasirie & Co. - Kandy - 1907

Established 1876.

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Postby dognose » Wed May 09, 2012 4:50 am

ERNEST BARNES

192, Mount Street, Madras

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Source: Export American Industries - 1919

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Wed May 09, 2012 10:24 am

J. MANIKRAI & SONS

Elphinstone Street, Karachi

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Presumably this firm is the continuation of the silversmith Manik Rai. Manik Rai was a silversmith who fled the Kutch area following the 'Chhapaniyo Dukal', the great famine that struck the Kutch area in 1899-1900, and then settled in Karachi. He was noted as an exhibitor in the Lahore Exhibition of 1909.

The marks of J. Manikrai:

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On the left, what is likely to be one of their earlier marks, and on the right, the 'Bear' mark that has been attributed to J. Manikrai & Sons.

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Thu May 10, 2012 2:33 pm

TARACHAND PURSRAM RAMSWAMI

63, Meadow Street, Bombay

Branches at Calcutta and Rangoon.

Noted as exhibitors of an extensive display of jewellery at the Delhi Exhibition of 1902-3, where they were described as Jewellers, Diamond Merchants, and Silversmiths.

Tarachand Pursram Ramswami, 63, Meadow Street, Bombay. --This firm have an extensive display of both old and new jewellery and all forms of Indian artwares that will be found well worthy of study. The firm have branches in Calcutta and Rangoon dealers in art curios well as being jewellers, diamond merchants, and silver-smiths.

Source: Indian Art at Delhi - Being the Official Catalogue of the Delhi Exhibition, 1902-1903 - Sir George Watt Kt., CLE., M,B, CM., etc., - 1903

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Thu May 10, 2012 2:49 pm

BARTON, SON & Co.
Styled as Orr & Barton, for at least the period 1867-1881. Styled Barton, Son & Co. by 1900.

South Parade, Bangalore and Ootacamund

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Barton, Son & Co. - Ootacamund - 1916

Founded in 1861 by Thomas Barton, and later passing to his son, Percy Alfred Barton. The firm are still in business today after being acquired in 1947 by M.S. Mehta, and still remains in the hands of his family.

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AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION AT PALGHAUT (November 1867)

19. Class XIII, Jewelry.—The exhibition in this class was mostly composed of contributions by native gentleman. Several specimens of silver filagree-work from Cochin were much admired. Na u Ashari, of Palghaut, exhibited some very superior gold and silver-plating, and was awarded a prize. Some good English jewelry and Indian filagree work were also shown by Messrs. Orr and Barton, of Bangalore.

Source: The Madras Revenue Register - Volume 2 - 1868



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At the heading of these notes appear pictures of two important pieces of silver plate, manufactured by Messrs. Barton, Son, and Co., the well-known jewellers and silversmiths of Bangalore. Both have a distinct Anglo-Indian military interest. The designs, it should be added, are original, and the work has been executed entirely by Indian workmen under European supervision. No. 1 is a solid silver challenge cup, or, to be more particular, a challenge vase, which has been presented by the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Regiments of Lancers, Hyderabad Contingent, to the Poona assault-at-arms, for the best-mounted man-at-arms. The vase stands 28 inches high, exclusive of the plinth to which it is fitted. It is of an Italian shape, the most beautiful feature being the lip, which is supported by a model of a winged cherub. The handle is made by the fanciful coils of a serpent, and the size of the vase can better be imagined when it is stated that the serpent itself measures over 4-ft. in length.The lip, neck, body, and base of the vase are ornamented with floral and scroll design worked in high relief. The plinth bears an inscription plate, and ten small silver shields to take the names of winners each year.


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No. 2 represents the Bangalore Cup, 1901, which is shot for yearly at the Southern Indian Rifle Association Meeting, Bangalore. It stands 25-inches high. exclusive of the plinth, and is a handsome specimen of the silversmith’s art. The base and bowl of the cup are ornaniented with embossed floral and scroll work, highly burnished in parts. A solid silver winged figure, representing “Victory,” surmounts the trophy. The cup, which is won outright yearly, is one of the most valuable and important shot for in India. It was won last year by the 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment.


Source: Navy and Army Illustrated - Volume 13 - 1901

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Fri May 11, 2012 5:16 am

LATTEY BROTHERS

10, Government Place, Calcutta

Lattey Brothers ( R.J. Lattey, A.P. Lattey, D. Lattey, and Joseph Hayes) working period was 1843-1855. They were succeeded by Allan & Hayes.

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Cup and cover. Dimensions: Height: 17cm. Length: 26cm. Weight: 1300 grams.



http://www.925-1000.com/AngloIndian_01.html

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