South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

For information you'd like to share - Post it here - not for questions

South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 06, 2009 3:05 pm

Hi,

A listing of silversmiths and allied trades, resident in Cape Town in 1822.

Ahlers, Oltman.............................Silversmith...........17, Lange Street
Beets, Daniel...............................Silversmith...........18, Roze Street
Burgh, Christiaan Van Den............Watchmaker.........38, Loop Street
Byleveld, Jan...............................Silversmith...........31, Waterkant
Cleenwerk, L.F.............................Silversmith................Hoop Street
Collinet, Daniel.............................Goldsmith............11, Riebeek Street
Dumoulin, Boudewin.....................Silversmith............3, Vredenburg St.
Fox, Robert..................................Cutler..................26, Loop Street
Fruy, Francis................................Watchmaker...........1, Lely Street
Garisch, Christoffel.......................Watchmaker.........44, Bree Street
Jino, J.M......................................Watchmaker..........36, Waterkant
Koch, August Christoffel...............Silversmith..............5, Riebeek Street
Kombrink, Johan..........................Silversmith............29, Dorp Street
Landsberg, J.C.H..........................Watchmaker..........9, Langemarkt St.
Lotter, Gerhardus.........................Silversmith.............67, Loop Street
Lotter, Willem Godfried.................Silversmith...............6, Kerk Street
Lotter, Carel................................Silversmith..............43, Bree Street
Lotter, Johan Casper....................Silversmith..............75, Loop Street
Niestad, Carel..............................Silversmith...............3, Vinke Steeg
Roedolff, Frans............................Watchmaker..............4, Vinke Steeg
Rouvierre, August........................Watchmaker.............33, Hout Street
Smith, Joseph..............................Watchmaker..............3a, Berg Street
Thomson, James..........................Watchmaker............2, Korfemarkt St.
Townsend, Thomas Lock..........Goldsmith & Jeweller.....17, Strand Street
Twentyman, Lawrence..................Watchmaker.............30, Heeregragt
Wilson, William.............................Watchmaker........22a, Langemarkt St.
Wolhuter, G.E...............................Silversmith...............13, Waterkant
Wolhuter, Christoffel Paul..............Watchmaker..............29, Lange Street

Source: The African Court Calendar and Directory
By George Ross, A Richert
Published by Govt. Printing Office, 1822


Trev.
.
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 05, 2010 2:57 pm

FERGUSON & Co.

Jewellers - The Corner, Durban, Natal.

Image
Ferguson & Co. - Durban - 1883

Image
Ferguson & Co. - Durban - 1897

Trev.
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cape Town--1822

Postby dognose » Wed Oct 06, 2010 2:07 pm

COLLINS BROTHERS

Jewellers & Electro Platers, Manufacturers of Gold and Diamond Jewellery. - Pritchard Street, Johannesburg.

Image
E.A.E. Collins of Collins Brothers - Johannesburg - 1907


LIST BROTHERS

Masonic & General Jewellers. Pritchard Street, Johannesburg.

Image
Lou Collins of List Brothers - Johannesburg - 1907

Trev.
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Silversmiths & Allied Trades--Cape Town--1822

Postby dognose » Tue Dec 07, 2010 3:07 pm

WOLF BROTHERS

Watch Manufacturers and Jewellers. - 54, Darling Street, Cape Town.

Image
Wolf Brothers - Cape Town - 1907

Trev.
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 25, 2011 8:39 am

I. MENDELSOHN & Co.

Jewellers and Watch Manufacturers. 73, Burg Street, Cape Town.

Image
I Mendelsohn & Co. - Cape Town - 1908

Image
I Mendelsohn & Co. - Cape Town - 1908

Trev.
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 15, 2011 2:25 pm

NICHOLLS & GOODWIN

Watchmakers, Jewellers, and Opticians. - Scott Street, Newcastle, Natal.


Image

Harold Edward Nicholls. Born 10th July 1878, Handsworth, Birmingham, England. Son of George Nicholls. Educated: St Silas School, Aston, Birmingham, England. Came to Colony: 2nd February 1902. Nicholls & Goodwin, Scott Street, Newcastle. Member of The Newcastle Club.

Image

William Morrison Goodwin. Born: 29th October 1880, Birmingham, England. Son of Frederick Ireland Goodwin. Married: 6th March 1903, Matilda Owen Clissold. Educated: St Pauls. Came to Colony: 2nd February 1902. Nicholls & Goodwin, Scott Street, Newcastle.

Trev.

Source: The Natal Who's Who: An Illustrated Biographical Sketch Book of Natalians - Natal Who's Who Publishing Co. - 1906
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 16, 2011 3:09 pm

SCHULTIS, SCHWAR & Co.

Wholesale Jewellers and Watch Manufacturers - 49, Goswell Road, Clerkenwell, London, and Pretoria, Transvaal.

Image
Schultis, Schwar & Co. - London and Pretoria - 1888

This firm is noted as being that of Louis Schultis and Henry Schwar, it is likely that Schwar managed the London branch and Schultis the Pretoria branch. They disolved their partnership in 1887, but the firm continued, with the London branch moving to 24, Clerkenwell Road, Clerkenwell in 1901.

They went into liquidation as Schultis Schwar Ltd. in 1939.

Source: The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths - John Culme

Trev.
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 04, 2011 2:34 pm

W. H. BLACKLER

Jeweller, Art Metal Worker, and Optician, Seventh Avenue, Bulawayo, Southern Rhodesia.

The visitor to Rhodesia, upon arrival in Bulawayo, will be surprised to find how many handsome emporiums the town contains, and this is particularly noticeable in the jewellery trade. One of the foremost jewellery firms in Bulawayo is that of Mr. W. H. Blackler, which was established in 1896. The premises externally are very handsome, and are surmounted by a large clock, which is regulated daily to standard South African time from the Cape Town Observatory. Internally the establishment is appointed and equipped in a remarkably elegant and costly manner, and the handsome fittings of the showrooms serve to enhance the beauty and attractiveness of the stock they contain. The large plate-glass windows also give advantages in the matter of outward display, and exhibit a very interesting and tasteful assortment of high-class goods. It would be impossible within the limits at our disposal here to give a full enumeration of the many notable articles comprised in Mr. Blackler's large, valuable, and thoroughly comprehensive stock; but among the numerous specialities which call for mention, we note gold and silver watches, clocks and timepieces in a great many new and artistic designs, and fine gold and gem jewellery, displaying the perfection of pattern and workmanship. The display of Rhodesian jewellery in various artistic designs is particularly interesting to the visitor, and comprises brooches and trinkets made from granite obtained from the tomb of the late Cecil John Rhodes; lovebeans made into bracelets, chains, and other designs; and ladies' hat-pins made from mahogany beans.

Image

A large selection is also held of chain trinkets, scarf-pins, and brooches made from Rhodesian gold. Another speciality of Mr. Blackler is cases of souvenir spoons, with the B.S.A. coat-of-arms and other devices upon them. In brief, the visitor should not fail to inspect the interesting stock held of Rhodesian jewellery when meditating purchasing an interesting and valuable souvenir of his or her visit.

It is also noteworthy that Mr. Blackler is a practical jeweller, has all industrial facilities on the premises, and employs a staff of the most skilful and experienced workmen. Special attention is devoted to all kinds of repairing, and orders in this connection are executed with the greatest care and promptitude.

The establishment is well worthy of a visit, and a glance at the large and superb stock it contains will at once convince the most sceptical that it is not necessary to journey further than Mr. Bladder's emporium in order to procure jewellery of the newest design, best quality, and most artistic character. Mr. Blackler has been appointed jeweller to the British South Africa Company, and his postal address is P.O. Box 251.


Source: Southern Rhodesia: An Account of its Past History, Present Development, Natural Riches, and Future Prospects: With special particulars for intending settlers, numerous illustrations and much general information - South African Publishing Syndicate - 1907

Trev.
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Aug 06, 2011 3:27 pm

The catalogue of The South African Exhibition held at Port Elizabeth in 1885 casts some valuable light on those firms working in the trade in South Africa at this period of time.

Jewellery

The exhibits of jewellery and its cognate branches, especially the manufactures from colonial gold and other productions, formed a most interesting and pleasing feature of the Exhibition. They were interesting ;is showing the immense strides made in these artistic industries during the last decade, and pleasing as exhibiting what exquisitely beautiful ornaments may be made from our own products.

Most important in this section were the exhibits of Messrs. A. Fischer & Co., Port Elizabeth. This firm evidently entered into the spirit of the Exhibition in genuine earnest, and deserve full recognition for their efforts to show their own special wares and to furnish visitors with some insight into the methods of manufacture and repair. In order to illustrate the mechanical parts of their trade, which includes all branches of the manufacture and repair of jewellery, watches and clocks, metal-work within the usual scope of the goldsmith, the silversmith, the lapidary, the enameller, the die sinker, engraver, chaser, embosser and designer, workmen carried on their ordinary routine in the presence of the public, at the stand in the Western room. Although of special concern only to those who could follow the processes of the craftsmen, there was yet much of interest to the general public in watching workmanship in material not usually within reach of the public eye. Visitors had an opportunity of watching the working of the wheel-and pinion cutting machine; the turning lathe for shaping metals and fittings; the mandril used for jewel setting in watch plates, etc.; and a number of other practical illustrations in the mechanism of this important and artistic branch of trade. Throughout the period of the Exhibition this stand attracted interested and inquisitive groups of spectators beyond the usual number cognizant of the trade. The exhibits at this stand were of an elegant and high class character, and many of them possessed, to most spectators, the additional charm of novelty. Amongst the clocks were two which obtained special attention. One was a "one year clock" made by the firm in the colony, in, case of colonial wood, which is so constructed as to resist variations of temperature and keep up to the standard of regulation for 365 days from the time it is wound up. As the firm point out, the great use of such a clock in a public building is obvious. The disadvantages and difficulties of periodical windings in clocks in church and other towers often prove a source of great care and vexation. The other horological novelty was an electric clock, the works of which received their motion direct from the electric current from a battery at the stand. By means of this interesting instrument the time was marked on large dials in conspicuous positions in the hall of the building, and proved of great convenience to the public. The clock has a pendulum beating seconds. It will doubtless be remembered that when this class of instrument was first exhibited in London it was regarded as a great achievement to measure by half-minute jumps. A time ball in connection with this clock was also an interesting novelty.

The firm deserve credit for their exhibits of electric bells and minor apparatus for domestic requirements, and this part of the stand was closely examined and experiments frequently made. The jewellery manufactured in the colony by the firm was beautifully and artistically executed. Some specimens of crocidolite engaged much attention. This stone is to be found in quantity in Griqualand West and adjacent parts, but until a few years ago it has not engaged much attention for purposes of ornament. It seems probable, however, that it will now become popular in Europe. Amongst the raw material on exhibit were specimens of South African gold in quartz, smelted and rolled; mahogany seeds from the Zambesi and Transvaal; brilliant seeds from the West Coast of Africa; seeds from St. John's River ; and various native woods. The specimens of copperplate engravings, &c, were most creditable, considering that this branch is not yet beyond its infancy in this colony.

The designs for the prize medals, which were accepted by the Executive Committee, and other specimens of the art of engraving, showed artistic effort worthy of unqualified commendation.

Messrs. Joseph & Sons, of Port Elizabeth, exhibited a magnificent range of diamond and gold jewellery, gold and crocidolite jewellery—all elegantly and artistically finished.

The exhibits of Mr. E. W. Shaw, of the Paarl, consisted of handsomely executed work in gold and silver; ostrich egg-shells, mounted in silver ; colonial wood, mounted in argent; clock, etc. A novelty at this stand consisted of a silver-mounted tobacco jar, made of twenty-three kinds of colonial wood.

Mr. B. D. McGill, Port Elizabeth, exhibited some creditable work in jewellery from South African gold; also diamond rings, brooches, &c.

Mr. H. C. Galpin, Graham's Town, exhibited diamond rings and diamond pendants of colonial stones, gold rings, brooches, bangles, &c. Some colonial beetles, mounted as brooch and ear-rings, and other articles of novelty, appeared to great advantage and displayed very creditable effort.

Mr. J. S. Wilcox, of Graham's Town, had on exhibition excellent specimens of engraving in metal and ivory; ornamental engraving; gold and silversmith's work, electroplating and gilding ; jewellery made of South African gold, &c. All the workmanship was colonial, and much practical skill and ability seem to have been displayed, in design and workmanship.

These exhibits of colonial-made jewellery and other articles in variety showed what can be done in the colony with gold and precious stones, and demonstrated that we have the necessary skill, taste and other requisites to hand for the satisfaction of all requirements. Ladies might reasonably initiate the custom of receiving presents of the goldsmith and silversmith's art only when made in the colony.


Source: The South African Exhibition, Port Elizabeth, 1885: lectures, prize and other essays, jury reports and awards. Edited by Charles Cowen F.F.S. - 1886

Trev.
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 08, 2011 6:46 am

MARTINUS LOURENS SMITH (SCHMIDT)

Cape Town

An example of the work of the Cape silversmith Martinus Lourens Smith (Schmidt).

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image
Photos courtesy of Carey Hill

Silver snuff box, 2½ x 1¾ x 5/8 inches and weighing 66gms.

Martinus Lourens Smith originated from Aalborg in Denmark, he arrived at the Cape on the 27th October 1757. He was recorded as having married four times and having ten children. He died on the 18th March 1806.

Trev.
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 11, 2011 2:31 pm

WILLIAM CAIE

Jeweller and Watchmaker Abercorn Street, Bulawayo, Southern Rhodesia.

Our review of the commerce and industry of Bulawayo must include the business of Mr. William Caie, which illustrates in a very efficient manner the various branches of skilled work connected with the watchmaking and jewellery trade. His attractive establishment in Abercorn Street is handsomely appointed, and every advantage is taken of its equipment to display in a tasteful and methodical manner the wealth of beautiful articles comprising his stock. We know that "all that glitters is not gold," but here we have the glitter which proceeds from the genuine article, and the bright and well-ordered interior of the shop is the casket in which a large number of gems and precious materials are kept.

The increasing production and cheapening of watches is one of the commercial phenomena, and the enormous variety of their designs and qualities find demonstration in the extensive assortment which Mr. Caie holds, ranging from splendid articles within the reach of the poorest member of the community to most valuable specimens that only the wealthy can purchase. We may here mention that Mr. Caie is agent for the celebrated Waltham watches.

The glittering exhibition of brooches, of which we noticed several souvenir specimens made up with gold quartz obtained from the various mines in the country, bracelets, pins, rings, &c., is particularly interesting, and diamonds, rubies, sapphires, emeralds, opals, and other precious stones sparkle and glisten with everchanging fire as the visitor moves about the shop. Magnificent presentation plate of all kinds is also to be seen, while the collection of clocks should be viewed by anyone ' desirous of obtaining something out of the common—a timekeeper that will not only faithfully record the passing minutes and hours, but will combine these novel and ornamental features which the leading manufacturers are ever striving to exemplify in their best productions.

Passing through the shop we enter the gilding and electro-plating department, which is equipped with the latest appliances pertaining to this branch of the business. During our inspection of this department (which is under the able management of Mr. George Joss), we noticed a very fine and complicated piece of mechanism for the rolling of metals; also a blasting machine for frosting. Leaving here we pass into the watch-repairing shop, which is in the able hands of Mr. Thos. Forbes, and is resplendent with all the latest appliances necessary for the repairing of the most elaborate timepieces.

The business, which is under the personal supervision of Mr. Caie, was established in 1902, and has won golden opinions for the able manner in which it is conducted.


Source: Southern Rhodesia: An Account of its Past History, Present Development, Natural Riches, and Future Prospects: With special particulars for intending settlers, numerous illustrations and much general information - South African Publishing Syndicate - 1907



Detail of Thomas Forbes, who is mentioned in the above article:

MR. THOMAS FORBES

As his name suggests, is a Scotchman, and was born at Alford, near Aberdeen, in the year 1879. Receiving a liberal education in the town of his birth, he served his apprenticeship with Mr. John Watt, watchmaker, of Alford. Proceeding to Peterhead in 1901, he was for two years with Mr. Stephen, watchmaker and jeweller, of that town, and later went to Messrs. James Smith and Son, of Aberdeen. Leaving Scotland in 1905, Mr. Forbes came to Cape Town, and proceeding to Bulawayo, arrived in that town on the 12th April, when he joined the well-known firm of Mr. William Caie, one of the leading watchmakers and jewellers in the town, in which establishment he holds the position of head of the watch and clock repairing department. Mr. Forbes is an enthusiastic rifle shot; is a member of the Bulawayo Rifle Club and the Southern Rhodesia Volunteers in both of which he is popular and greatly respected.

Source: Southern Rhodesia: An Account of its Past History, Present Development, Natural Riches, and Future Prospects: With special particulars for intending settlers, numerous illustrations and much general information - South African Publishing Syndicate - 1907


Image
Caie - Bulawayo - 1912

Trev.
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 12, 2011 4:05 pm

THOMAS RADMALL

Goldsmith & Jeweller - 28, Heerengracht, Cape Town.

Image
Thomas Radmall - Cape Town - 1846

Thomas Radmall was born c.1793 and died on the 28th July 1854 at Cape Town. His first wife, Elizabeth Martin, died in 1853, his second wife, Elizabeth Adams was born on the 28th November 1830 and died on the 30th August 1904.



MARRIAGE
Those about to be married and others making presents would do well to inspect that most Fashionable and Splendid Assortment of Jewellery, Watches &c and other innumerable Ornaments of Bijouterie at Thomas RADMALL’s, 28 Heerengracht, adjoining the Cape of Good Hope Bank, where the most moderate prices are asked for Ready Money.


Source: South African Commercial Advertiser - 23rd November 1844

Trev.
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 15, 2011 5:29 pm

E. BURMESTER

58 - 78 - 86, Adderley Street, Cape Town

Image
E. Burmester - Cape Town - 1886

Image
E. Burmester - Cape Town - 1896

Image
E. Burmester - Cape Town - 1907

Image
E. Burmester - Cape Town - 1908

The above advertisement states that this firm were established in 1864.

Trev.
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Aug 17, 2011 4:06 pm

H. NELSON

114, Loop Street, Cape Town

Image
H. Nelson - Cape Town - 1846

Trev.
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 19, 2011 6:50 pm

WALKER & HALL

Cape Town Buildings, St George's Street, Cape Town.

Image
Walker & Hall - Cape Town - 1907

As can be seen from the above advertisement, Walker & Hall were represented in South Africa at the turn of the 20th century.

Trev.
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 21, 2011 10:36 am

SCKWAKE, WATT & Co.

286, Longmarket Street, Maritzburg, Natal.

Amongst the watchmakers, jewellers, and opticians of the City, Messrs. Sckwake, Watt & Co. take a deservedly high place. Their establishment at 286, Longmarket Street, facing the Market Square, is not only beautifully fumished, but contains one of the finest-selected stocks to be found in the Colony. The business is an old-established one, it having been commenced in 1880 by Mr. Bernard Schwake in premises adjoining the Plough Hotel. For 18 years business was conducted in this place, but within the past few months it was found imperatively necessary, by reason of the increased patronage of the public, to remove to the present handsome premises which it occupies. Six years ago Mr. Schwake, the senior partner, removed to London to act as buyer for the firm, and is, by his South African experience, enabled to obtain direct from the manufacturers goods which not only suit the trade, but, through personal selection, are of the best quality, and can be offered at prices lower than could otherwise be done. In the optical department, the firm lays itself out to supply any description of spectacles, pince-nez, etc., to suit all sights, and carry out doctors' and oculists' prescriptions with the greatest care. The horological and jewellery departments, as well as the general business of the firm, are conducted by Mr. Henry Niesewand, the sole South African partner, who has achieved a wide popularity by reason of his unremitting attention to the requirements of his customers.

Source: The Story of an African City - Joseph Forsyth Ingram - 1898

Image
Sckwake, Watt & Co. - Maritzburg - 1898

Trev.
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 22, 2011 4:38 pm

E.G. KERBY & Co.

191, Church Street, Maritzburg, Natal.

Image
E G Kerby & Co. - Maritzburg - 1898

Trev.
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Aug 27, 2011 1:02 pm

S. MARCUS

16, Short Market Street, Cape Town.

Image
S Marcus - Cape Town - 1846

Trev.
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 29, 2011 2:08 pm

GEORGE SMITH

171, Church Street, Pietermaritzburg.

Image
Geo. Smith - Pietermaritzburg - 1898

Trev.
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Aug 30, 2011 2:05 pm

JEREMIE AUGUSTE ROUVIERE

4, Hout Street, and later (after 1821) 33, Hout Street, Cape Town.

Listed as a watchmaker in 'The African Court Calendar and Directory' of 1822 (see first post at the top of this topic), Rouviere is also thought to have been a silversmith. A Swiss national, born at Neuchatel, Switzerland in 1783, he arrived at the Cape in July 1803. His first workshop was located at 4, Hout Street and he later moved to 33, Hout Street, where he is listed in 1822.

Rouviere married Anna Elizabeth Rossouw (died 1842), in 1808, and obtained citizenship in 1817. Rouviere died c.1852.

Trev.
dognose
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14634
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Next

Return to Contributors' Notes

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Majestic-12 [Bot] and 5 guests