Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Nov 08, 2010 9:11 am

William Eaton (Grimwade 3105-6) as at July 1839

Richard Chatterton (Journeyman spoonmaker)
Thomas Atkins (Melter)
........Chatterton (Son of Richard Chatterton - Position unknown)


GUILDHALL

LAW Versus LABOUR
Richard Chatterton, a journeyman spoonmaker, was charged with assaulting Thomas Atkins, a melter, in the service of Mr Eaton, a spoon manufacturer in Jewin Cresent. - Mr Hobler, jnr., said this assault arose out of a strike in the trade, to compel the Masters to pay for work as soon as it was given out, and to trust to the men to finish it, and he was sent by Mr Eaton to protect the complainant. - Atkins stated that he left off work at seven in the evening of Thursday last, and at the end of Jewin Cresent he saw the defendant, who had quitted his Master's service on account of the strike. Complainant spoke civilly to him, enquiring how he was, and the defendant gave him an abusive answer, and struck him two severe blows. Complainant then returned him one blow for the two. - Several wittnesses were heard in corroboration. The return blow given by the complainant was of such force as to knock Chatterton down and he was carrird to the hospital in a state of insensibility. - The defendant pleaded that he went to meet his son, who works at Mr Eaton's; that he only called to the complainant; that he might have struck him, but did not remember; and that he had suffered severely from the blow he had received. - Mr Alderman Brown, after consulting with Mr Alderman Lainson, said they felt no sympathy on account of the injury he had received in consequence of his folly. Every man had a right to get what reward for his labour he could, and so had any set of men; but they had no right to interrupt or interfere with other men who chose to work on different terms. The law would not permit them to wreak their vengeance on a man who chose to accept employment on terms which they had rejected. The magistrates had hesitated whether they should not send this case to the quatter sessions, but the decision he was about to pronounce gave a much lighter punishment than any future delinquents would suffer, if such a course of violence should be continued. They would find the law much too strong for them. - The prisoner was fined £5, and to be imprisoned two months, if such fine were not sooner paid.

Source: The London Dispatch - Sunday 4th August 1839


Richard Chatterton had been apprenticed to his elder brother, Randall Chatterton (Grimwade 2290), as from the 3rd April 1816.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Nov 16, 2010 4:40 pm

George William Adams (Chawner & Co.) as at c.1850 until 1868
Edward John Carter (Journeyman spoonmaker)

GUILDHALL

The Extensive Robbery of Silver and Plate

Edward John Carter, a silver-plate worker, was charged with stealing upwards of 400 ounces of silver, from his employer, Mr. Adams, of 16 and 17 Hosier Lane, City.

Mr. Knight appeared for the prisoner.

The details of the case have already appeared. The prisoner was employed as a silver spoonmaker. He had been apprenticed to the firm, and when out of his time he had been kept on as a journeyman. He had been in their employ altogether about eighteen years. Prosecutor finding he was robbed sent for Detective Smith, who took prisoner into custody when leaving work, and found pieces of silver in his pocket. Smith then went to prisoner's house, and found 300 silver spoons, besides pieces of silver, of the value altogether of £80.

The prisoner, who had nothing to say, was committed for trial.


Source: The Standard - 13th November 1868

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 21, 2010 3:37 pm

Sarl & Sons as at January 1857
Charles Wallis (Journeyman Silversmith)

Shocking Accident on Cornhill-Two People Nearly Killed

Yesterday morning a very frightful accident happened at the new premises in the course of errection for Messrs. Sarl and Co., silversmiths and jewellers, at the corner of Pope's Head Alley, Cornhill, and which, it is feared will terminate fatally to two persons. To admit of the business being carried on as usual a somewhat complicated scaffolding had been errected to carry up the new premises, and an objectionable, if not very dangerous, course is pursued of allowing foot passengers to pass underneath, instead of outside in the roadway. About nine o'clock yesterday morning the workman were in the act of fixing a large stone (weighing nearly two tons) on an iron girder beam (above the intended shop front, some twenty feet from the pavement), when it swerved from its position, and toppled over and fell through the scaffolding on to the pavement, James Goodfellow, one of the stonemasons, falling with it. At the moment of its falling Charles Wallis, aged 50, a journeyman silversmith, was passing through the covered passage to his employment, and the penderous mass fell upon his legs, fracturing them in a most shocking manner. The stonemason who fell with it also fractured both his legs, and the foreman of the works, who had a marvellous escape from being crushed to death, escaped with slight injuries. Both the sufferers were extricated as soon as practicable, and conveyed to St. Thomas's Hospital, where Wallis underwent almost immediate amputation of the right leg by Mr. Simon, the head surgeon of the institution. The poor fellow lies in a most critical state. The other sufferer, Goodfellow, lays in a similar state.

Source: The Morning Chronicle - Tuesday 6th January 1857 - Issue 28091

Below is an advertisement for the opening of Sarl & Sons premises where the tragedy took place.

Image
Sarl & Sons - London - 1860

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 27, 2010 3:57 pm

George Wintle (Grimwade 923-6) as at 1810-1813

Thomas Dickens (Journeyman)

On the 17th February 1813 George Wintle was tried at the Old Bailey. He was charged on four counts of counterfeiting the marks of the Goldsmiths Company of London. One of the witness's called that day was a journeyman of George Wintles', Thomas Dickens. See: http://www.925-1000.com/a_OB_Wintle1813.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Part of the transcript taken from the trial reads as follows:

THOMAS DICKENS. I am a silver polisher.

Q. Have you been for some time past in the employ of the prisoner - A. Yes, on and off about three years.

Q. Were you working at the time the officers came to make search - A. I was. I was going to get the lathe to brush the plain table-spoons. I had three in my hand when they came in.

Q. Where were the other nine - A. The other officer found them. They were in the wheel-box, near me.

Q. Now, these spoons, had you seen them before in the course of that week - A. I had seen them the day before. I had them given out to me to smooth fine, to make ready for the hall.

Q. Did you smooth-fine them on the Thursday - A. Yes; I took them up stairs, and after I had smooth-fined them I took them down, and delivered them to James Wintle , to take to the hall.

Q. How long had you them out - A. I had them out before eight o'clock; and I took them down a little before nine in the morning. I suppose it was about ten minutes as near as I can guess. I delivered them back to James Wintle . He assisted his father in the business. He used often to give work out; and take it in, and pay us sometimes.

Q. Did Mr. Wintle conduct his business, or leave it to others - A. He used to be there almost always; he was there that week.

Q. Before you delivered them back to James Wintle , did you put a mark upon them - A. I did.

Q. I believe it is customary for each workman to put a mark upon them that he might know them, to finish them - A. It is. I put a X upon them. Them nine have my mark, and them three have my mark.

For a complete transcript of the trial go to: http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.j ... 8130217-39" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Image

Image

Above are the images of a tablespoon (9" (22.6cm) in length and weighing 57 grams, assayed at London in 1810) that clearly shows the journeyman's mark of Thomas Dickens.

This is the third journeyman's mark that we have identified, along with photographic evidence, on 925-1000.com, following that of Benjamin Bailey Thorogood who worked for Solomon Hougham and John Whip who worked for Edward Jackson at York.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Dec 21, 2010 5:32 pm

Joseph Glenny (Grimwade p.339) as at December 1807.

George Russell (Journeyman)

Old Bailey, Saturday 16th January

George Russell, a journeyman goldsmith was capitally convicted for stealing, on the 23rd December, in the dwelling-house of Joseph Glenny, watchcasemaker, Red Lion Street, Clerkenwell, eighteen pennyweight of gold wire, value £2-10s.

Source: The Morning Post. Monday 18th January 1808.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 23, 2010 1:29 pm

The Apprentices of Thomas Watson of Newcastle

Thomas Robinson (I) Son of Thomas Robinson, Blacksmith of Gateshead, Co. Durham. Indentured to Robert Scott (II) for a period of seven years as from 8th August 1791. Upon Scott's demise in 1793 he was accepted by Watson to finish his term. He was did not become free of the Company until 6th December 1831. Warden of the Company twice. Married Eleanor Mills 23rd September 1800. Died June 1853, aged 76/77 years.

Joseph Watson Son of Joseph Watson, Clog maker of Elsdon, Northumberland. Half brother to Thomas. Indentured for a period of seven years as from 12th February 1794. Free of the Newcastle Company 3rd May 1809. Warden of the Company five times. Married Dorothy Dodd 25th October 1804. Died April 1816, aged 37 years.

Francis Somerville (II) Son of Francis Somerville (I), Silversmith of Newcastle. Indentured for a period of seven years as from 20th February 1799. Free of the Company 1st August 1815. Warden of the Company ten times. Served as Assay Master at Newcastle from 6th December 1831 until his death in December 1854, aged 68 years. He never married.

Joseph Walker Son of James Walker, Yeoman of Byron's Leap, Chester-le-Street, Co. Durham. Indentured for a period of seven years as from 10th January 1801.

William Best Son of William Best, Yeoman of Newcastle. Indentured for a period of seven years as from 2nd August 1803. Free of the Company 19th August 1847. Dead by 1874.

Francis Sanderson Son of George Sanderson, Farmer of Shilverton, Northumberland. Indentured for a period of seven years as from 9th January 1807. Free of the Company 27th November 1826 and served as Warden to the Company nine times. Emigrated to Australia in 1852 and died there in 1863 aged 71 years.

James Walkinshaw Son of James Walkinshaw, Tailor of Newcastle. Indentured for a period of seven years as from 3rd October 1808. Free of the Company 27th November 1826 and served as Warden eight times.

John Miller Son of William Miller, Yeoman of Newcastle. Indentured for a period of seven years as from 28th December 1809. Free of the Company 6th December 1831. Thought to have died in April 1838, aged 54 years.

John McDonald Son of Peter McDonald, Tailor of Gateshead, Co. Durham. Indentured for a period of seven years as from 22nd March 1813.

Thomas Sewell (I) Son of John Sewell, Tinman of Newcastle. Indentured for a period of seven years as from 30th June 1818. Free of the Company 2nd February 1846 and served as Warden to the Company fifteen times. Married twice, Ann ?, and then to Mary Rippon 21st August 1851. Purchased the business of Thomas Watson following the death of his old Master. Died 30th October 1883, aged 80 years.

Ralph Lamb Son of Ralph Lamb, Victualler of Gateshead, Co. Durham. Indentured for a period of seven years as from 5th February 1822.

James Robson Son of William Robson, Tinplate worker of Newcastle. Indentured for a period of seven years as from 18th December 1827. Free of the Company 3rd May 1846 and served as Warden once. He was elected Assay Master at Newcastle 13th December 1854, a position he held until the closure of the assay office in June 1884. He had previously held the position of Stamper for nineteen years. Married to Elizabeth. Died 29th December 1900, aged 88 years.

John Bainbridge Son of William Bainbridge, Mariner of Byker, Northumberland. Indentured for a period of seven years as from 2nd June 1836. He served a temporary period as Stamper at Newcastle in 1855.


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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 30, 2010 11:34 am

Herman Jacobi (James) Walther (Grimwade 1020) as at April 1772

Philip Cornman (Grimwade 2148) (Apprentice)

Image

Whereas Philip Cornman, Apprentice to Herman Jacobi Walther, Jeweller and Gold-worker, departed himself from his said Master's Service on the 29th April, without his Consent : This said Master doth hereby forewarn all Persons from harbouring or employing his said Apprentice at their peril, and doth command him to return immediately to his Duty.

Whoever brings or gives Intelligence of the said Philip Cornman, shall be properly rewarded by an injured and insulted Master.


Source: Public Advertiser, Friday 1st May 1772.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby MCB » Sun Jan 02, 2011 2:29 pm

After he ran away Philip Cornman did not disappear.
He was originally apprenticed to Christopher Binger of St Pancras from 22nd March 1768 for 7 years on payment of just £2. He was presumably later turned over to Walther. He was likely of German extraction.
Insurance policies of 1781show he was an engraver at Little St Martin’s Lane and in the same trade in 1786 at 5, Newport Street whilst in 1790 he appears in Holden’s London Directory from the same address adding printmaker to his activities. From 1788-92 he is also recorded as a sculptor exhibiting models and portraits in wax at the Royal Academy.
He entered a mark with the Assay Office from Newport Street in 1793.
He married Mary Naylor at St Anne’s Soho in 1794. She was 44 years old and judging by when he became an apprentice he was about the same age.
By 1807 a Henry Cornman had joined the business at 5, Newport Street which then traded as Cornman & Son gold and silver workers. This indicates that Philip may have been married before. This partnership continued until 1820. Philip died in 1822 after which the firm became Cornman Son & Bridges from 22 Newman Street.
His wife Mary and Henry died in the same year 1830.
Some of the above information can be found on pages 741-2 of A G Grimwade’s book on London Goldsmiths 1697-1837.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Jan 08, 2011 5:14 am

William Eaton (Grimwade 3105-6) as at September 1834

James Christmas (Journeyman)
William Christmas (Position unknown)
John Watson (Position unknown)
John Gray (Porter)

Source: Old Bailey Court Records

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 10, 2011 6:10 am

Daniel Suks (Soux) (Heal p.251,247) as at March 1717.

James Giro
..... Morris

Image

Whereas James Giro, Apprentice to Mr Soux, Working Silver Smith in George Yard, near Holborn Bars, was on the 27th of March last, sent to the Bear Inn in Basinghall Street, with a Letter to receive the following Goods from the York Carrier, viz. 34 Ounces of burnt silver, and 32 Ounces of Old Sterling, 55 Ounces of silver melted, a silver Tankard without a Lid, and about 11 Ounces of other silver, which he receiv'd, and has absented himself from his Master's Service ever since. The said James Giro is short and black, ag'd about 23, speaks both French and English, born in Spittle Fields. Whoever secures him and the Goods, and gives Notice to his said Master, shall have 3 Guineas Reward and reasonable Charges, or proportionable for any part. Note, one Morris run away with several silver Snuff Boxes from Mr Soux. Whoever gives Notice of him shall have a Guinea Reward.

Source: The Evening Post - 16th April 1717

Daniel Suks was recorded by Sir Ambrose Heal as a Goldsmith of George Yard, Holborn in 1712. He also records a Daniel Soux, Goldsmith of Goulston Square, near Whitechapel Bars in 1701, they are most likely to be one of the same person.

Daniel Suks (Soux) is possibly to be identified with John Soux (Grimwade 1652). Arthur Grimwade suppected perhaps that John was Daniel's son or nephew.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 19, 2011 10:03 am

Drayson & Burwash as at c.1855
Robert Matthew Morell (Foreman)

Source: Parliamentry Select Committee notes - 1868

Drayson & Burwash, later known as Drayson, Burwash & Drayson, were noted as manufacturing Goldsmiths and Jewellers, of 16, Brewer Street, Golden Square, London. Robert Morell spent 25 years in their employ.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 10, 2011 2:59 pm

John Laithwait (Lathwaite) (Grimwade pp.304, 340) as at April 1779
Thomas Knight (Watchcasemaker)
John Nevill (Apprentice) (Grimwade p.306)

Source: Old Bailey Court Records

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 11, 2011 3:27 pm

Thomas Gooch (Grimwade p.320) as at October 1797
William Tink
Thomas Pyrer (Aprentice)

Thomas Pyrer had spent two years as an errand boy for Thomas Gooch before becoming an apprentice.

Source: Old Bailey Court Records

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 15, 2011 1:35 pm

William Rowland(s) (Grimwade pp.331, 353, 354) as at December 1821
Robert Rowland (Brother of above)
Charles Davis
Stephen Luff (Errand Boy)

Source: Old Bailey Court Records

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 16, 2011 8:50 am

Maurice Freeman Ltd. as at May 1932
Harry Freeman (real name Aaron Freedman) (Partner)
....Davidson (nephew of Harry Freeman) (Partner)
Charles Oliver Boylett (Foreman and Manager)
Harry Richmond Ross (Journeyman)

In February 1933, Harry Freeman and Charles Boylett appeared at the Old Bailey on a charge of being in possession of silver bearing transposed hallmarks. Much of the case against Freeman and Boylett rested on the testimony given by a journeyman of theirs, Harry Ross. Ross, who had worked for Maurice Freeman Ltd from July 1924 until May 1932, kept details of the various articles of silver that he worked on. Although Freeman and Boylett were found not guilty, the publicity of the trial was to prove the ruination of the business and Maurice Freeman Ltd went into receivership in March 1933.

Source: The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers & Allied Traders - 1838-1914 - John Culme

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 29, 2011 12:37 pm

George Smith II (Grimwade 896-8, 909) as at July 1782
Henry Boddiwell (Foreman)
John Wood (Journeyman)

John Wood worked for George Smith for ten years. In September 1782 he was convicted at the Old Bailey for stealing nearly seven hundred pairs of buckles from George Smith. He was sentenced to seven years transportation to Africa.

Source: Old Bailey Court Records

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 29, 2011 1:28 pm

Stephen Gilbert (Grimwade 36-7) and James Ansill (Ansell) as at August 1766
William Curry
Martin Vasthold

Stephen Gilbert and James Ansill were suppliers to the important firm of Parker & Wakelin.

Source: Old Bailey Court Records

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Jul 09, 2011 6:13 pm

William Eady (Grimwade pp383-4) as at September 1845
......Brown (Partner)
George Taylor (Foreman)
James Bewes (Journeyman)
John Greive (Journeyman)
Richard Garrett (Journeyman)

At an Old Bailey trial, George Taylor is quoted as saying that at least 32 journeymen were working for William Eady at this time.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Jul 11, 2011 3:23 pm

William Fillan of Aberdeen 1847
Alexander Sutherland Clark (Apprentice)

Theft and Housebreaking
Alexander Sutherland Clark, Jeweller, was charged with having, in the course of the year 1847, stolen a number of articles of jewellery from the shop of William Fillan, Jeweller, Union Street, whose apprentice he was; as also, with having broken into the shop of Mr George Forbes, Grocer, St Nicholas Street, and stolen some tobacco and other articles. He pled guiltly to the theft as libelled, and was sentenced to imprisonment for eighteen months.

Source: The Aberdeen Journal - 12th April 1848

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby MCB » Wed Jul 13, 2011 6:34 am

William Eady

Arthur Grimwade’s book on London Goldsmiths 1697-1837 gives no biography of William Eady the goldsmith and jeweller which is a pity bearing in mind the large scale production of his business as evidenced by the number of journeymen he employed.
John Culme’s book on London Silver & Goldsmiths 1838-1914 is more forthcoming on the man and his business and it is with thanks to that publication added to other research for the following biography.
William Eady the son of William and Sarah was christened at St Botolph’s church London in April 1793. William senior born 1768 was a jeweller of West Street, Smithfield, London to whom his son was apprenticed from 1807-January 1815 when William junior obtained his freedom. William senior died in August of the same year.
William Eady entered his first mark at Goldsmiths Hall London from 26 Red Lion Street, Clerkenwell on 13th October 1821as a manufacturing jeweller and goldsmith. The mark showed his initials WE in a rectangular shape.
On 21st November 1821 he married Elizabeth Hayman of Norwich at St Peter Mancroft, Norwich. The Census records show they had 7 children born between 1823 and 1837.
In 1830 he was joined in partnership at 26 Red Lion Street by John Brown. No new mark seems to have been registered until the one entered on 16th February 1846 by Thomas Eady, William’s son, and John Brown. The mark showed TE over IB in a square shape.
The 1841 Census records William Eady living in Hornsey Middlesex
The partnership with John Brown lasted until 29th October 1846 when he left to set up business on his own.
On 30th October 1846 William was joined in partnership by his sons Henry born 1823 and Thomas born 1826. Only Thomas entered a new maker’s mark at that time which showed TE in a rectangle.
At the Great Exhibition of 1851 the firm displayed a chess set designed by Henry Eady in the form of the meeting on The Field of Cloth of Gold between the kings Henry VIII of England and Francis I of France.
William Eady retired from the business on 28th February 1852 and continued to live at the Hornsey address until his death on 10th October 1865.
The business was carried on by his sons Henry and Thomas.
Charles Paris joined Thomas in partnership in 1858 but no maker’s mark was entered.
The firm went through various changes in the following years; Thomas retired in 1883 and died in 1892 (as did his brother Henry).The business address remained at 26 Red Lion Street with additional premises at Garrard Street, Soho, London
In a final twist of fate the firm was absorbed around 1909 into that of John Brown & Sons successors to John Brown who had been William Eady’s business partner back in 1830.

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