Edwin S. Bonehill - Birmingham - Bookplate

Antique & vintage paperwork relating to the silver trade
dognose
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Edwin S. Bonehill - Birmingham - Bookplate

Postby dognose » Tue Dec 09, 2014 2:20 pm

A bookplate found in a copy of The Art of the Goldsmith and Jeweller by Thomas B. Wigley, published in 1898. The book was awarded to Edwin S. Bonehill as first prize for Success at the City & Guilds of London Institute exam in Silversmiths' work (Ordinary Grade).

As can be seen, Edwin Bonehill was a student at the Birmingham Jewellers' and Silversmiths' Association's Vittoria Street School during the session 1897-98.

The book was the gift of the Birmingham diamond and precious stone expert, Augustus A. Fridlander of Vyse Street, Birmingham, one of the leading lights in the Birmingham jewellery trade.

The bookplate is signed by the Chairman of the Birmingham Jewellers' and Silversmiths' Association, George Hope Johnstone, another leading light of the Birmingham jewellery trade and head of the manufacturing jewellers, G.H. Johnstone & Co.Ltd., of Northampton Street, Birmingham. It is dated 23rd November 1898.


Image


Did Edwin Bonehill make it as a silversmith? It would appear that he did, below are the known details so far:

Edwin Stutley Bonehill was born in 1878 at Harborne, Staffordshire, the son of William Bonehill and Ann Carrington. (Harborne is three miles (5 km) southwest from Birmingham city centre).

Census Details:

1881 Census: Edwin S, 3, born Harborne, Staffordshire, was with his parents William, 36, Hardware Warehouseman from Birmingham, and Ann, 36, from Loughborough, Leicestershire, at 84, King Edward Road, Birmingham, Warwickshire, England. With him were his siblings William H, 10, Scholar born Birmingham, Elizabeth J, 5, Scholar born Harborne, Staffordshire, and Ellen D, 9 months, born Birmingham.

1891 Census: Edwin S, 13, Scholar born Harborne, Staffordshire, was with his parents William, 46, Hardware Warehouseman from Birmingham, Warwickshire, and Ann, 46, from Loughborough, Leicestershire, at 47 Prescott Street, Birmingham, Warwickshire, England. With him were his siblings William H, 20, Assistant School Teacher born Birmingham, Warwickshire, Elizabeth A J, 15, Pupil Teacher born Harborne, Staffordshire, and Albert J, 8, born Birmingham, Warwickshire.

1901 Census: Edwin S, 23, Engraver Silversmith born Harborne, Staffordshire, was with his parents William, 56, Warehouse Man from Birmingham, Warwickshire, and Ann, 56, from Loughborough, Leicestershire, at 22 Twyning Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham, Warwickshire, England. With him were his siblings Elizabeth A, 25, School Mistress born Harborne, Staffordshire, and Albert J, 18, Manufacturer Chemist born Birmingham, Warwickshire.

Any further details regarding Edwin Stutley Bonehill would be greatly appreciated.

Trev.

dognose
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Re: Edwin S. Bonehill - Birmingham - Bookplate

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 08, 2015 7:27 am

The chief event of the month in the jewellers' quarter is the opening of the Art and Technical Schools at Vittoria Street by the mayor (Alderman Clayton), on the 18th inst. The ceremony was well attended, and most of the leading firms of Birmingham jewellers were represented. The list of those present included the chairman of the Jewellers' and Silversmiths' Association – Mr. J. M. Banks, Councillor Charles Green, who has done so much to bring the matter before the City Council, G. H. Johnstone, J. Wainwright, H. Westwood, M. Davis, J. Haseler, J. Bragg, C. B. Bragg, H. Davis, B. H. Joseph, W. Best, L. Spiers, P. H. Levi, E. M. Levetus, F. Nathan, G. W. Whitehouse, F. W. Martin, A. G. McKewan, E. R. Taylor (head master of the school of art), E. Preston Hytch (secretary of the school of art), and Allen Edwards (secretary of the Jewellers' and Silversmiths' Association). The mayor opened the proceedings and pointed out the objects and scope of the schools. Alderman Wm. Kenrick, M.P., proposed " that this meeting views with much satisfaction the completion of the Vittoria Street branch of the Birmingham School of Art," and Mr. J. M. Banks seconded the resolution. Mr. E. R. Taylor was called upon to respond. Councillor Green proposed a vote of thanks to the mayor, and in the course of his remarks thanked the City Council for their promptness of action in the matter. Councillor Allen seconded this, which was supported by Mr. Geo. Dixon, M.P.

It was announced in the course of the meeting that several generous promises had been made to the schools. Mr. Augustus A. Fridlander, of Hylton Street, offers £10 per annum for the next three years to be given in money prizes to the students. He suggests it should be apportioned as follows : £5 to be equally divided between the five pupils who have made the best attendance combined with good conduct throughout the session ; and £5 in two sums of fifty shillings each to the two pupils who have made the best general progress. Mr. Mark Norton, of Buckingham Street, has made a handsome gift to the school in the form of a set of jewellers' rolls or flatting mills, for reducing the thickness of the metal. This is a perfect specimen of its kind, and is of the newest type with all the most recent improvements. Mr. Henry Davis promised £5 per year for three years, to be awarded by the committee in prizes, and it is hoped that other offers of a similarly generous nature will be made by the trade.

To commemorate the opening of the schools, Mr. J. M. Banks has had printed in an exceedingly tasteful fashion, a four-page oblong card, on which the date of the function is inscribed along with an appropriate Ruskinian quotation. On the third page, in the form of an allegory, Mr. Banks has told the story of the efforts which have been made to introduce the artistic spirit into the manufacture of Birmingham jewellery. Reference is made to Parisian work, and a hope is expressed that Paris may no longer be the fountain of inspiration, but Birmingham, and that Birmingham will lead the way with work which shall outdo all the finest things which Paris is able to produce. Whether the Vittoria Street schools will do this we do not know, but there is the chance, at all events, and if the whole trade of the quarter will but unite and determine it shall, then the thing is practically done. We venture to hope that such a desirable state of things will be accomplished.


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st October 1890

Trev.


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