Help with Family Crests on Early Colonial Australian Silver - II?

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adong
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat May 19, 2018 5:13 am

Help with Family Crests on Early Colonial Australian Silver - II?

Postby adong » Sat May 19, 2018 6:10 am

Hi All,

What I would like to ask you experts today is for some help on family crests.


The second is a tablespoon by Charles Hendricks of Sydney c.1830. The marks used are very similar to that of Alexander Dick of Sydney. A spoon has been sold before as Alexander Dick by an auction house. The relationship of Charles Hendricks to Alexander Dick remains a mystery to me.
The crest is of an Arabic sword (as I have been advised).

Charles Hendricks
https://imgur.com/a/Ov8CTGx
https://imgur.com/a/yNQjA0O

Any clues or direction would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you in advance!

(admin edit)

adong
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat May 19, 2018 5:13 am

Re: Help with Family Crests on Early Colonial Australian Silver - II?

Postby adong » Sat May 19, 2018 7:00 am

Image
Image

donovank
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri May 18, 2018 7:15 pm

Re: Help with Family Crests on Early Colonial Australian Silver - II?

Postby donovank » Wed May 23, 2018 4:10 am

Hi
I don't believe your spoon can be attributed to being made by Charles Hendricks of Sydney c.1830. look closely at the hallmarks as it carries the full set of British silver hallmarks

This spoon is known as the Fiddle, Thread & Shell Pattern, looking at the Hallmarks on your spoon from left to right....the silversmith is Charles Hougham, the mark for silver meeting the sterling standard of purity is the Lion Passant, it was Assayed in London (crowned lions head), Capital E dates it to 1800, George III Sovereign head ('duty mark'), certifying the payment of the duty.

Dominant throughout the nineteenth century, Fiddle pattern is the most commonly found pattern from the 1800’s. Originating in France, it first occurred in England from the 1760’s without the shoulders on the stem near the bowl, particularly favoured in Scotland where it is known as Oar pattern. The most common Fiddle pattern variants are Fiddle & Thread and Fiddle, Thread & Shell. The production of plain Fiddle pattern ceased around the time of World War 1.

kev

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 35329
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Help with Family Crests on Early Colonial Australian Silver - II?

Postby dognose » Wed May 23, 2018 4:49 am

Hi Kev,

The marks are definitely pseudo's and only imitate official London hallmarks. At least three of the marks are remarkably similar, perhaps even struck with the same punches, as those used by Alexander Dick.

Trev.

donovank
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri May 18, 2018 7:15 pm

Re: Help with Family Crests on Early Colonial Australian Silver - II?

Postby donovank » Wed May 23, 2018 4:58 am

Hi Trev

Thanks for correcting my mistake , i will live and learn

Kev

davidappleton
contributor
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Mar 31, 2017 3:47 pm

Re: Help with Family Crests on Early Colonial Australian Silver - II?

Postby davidappleton » Wed May 23, 2018 11:47 am

The heraldic term for that kind of curved sword with a partial circle cut out of the back of the blade is a seax. The entry from Fairbairn's Crests which gives a listing of the families which used a seax as their crest is: Belsted, Belstede, Belstide, Beltead, Dalton, Nottage, Pearse, Rewtoure, and Thatcher.

I hop that this information is helpful.

David

paulh
contributor
Posts: 392
Joined: Wed Nov 29, 2006 6:02 pm
Location: Cheshire, England

Re: Help with Family Crests on Early Colonial Australian Silver - II?

Postby paulh » Mon May 28, 2018 4:05 pm

Just a thought, but could it be a Chinese export piece. There was a Chi Hua working in Beijing in the early 1900s.


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