Abstinando King Dishes?

PHOTOS REQUIRED - marks + item
niceguy1
Posts: 456
Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 7:50 pm

Abstinando King Dishes?

Postby niceguy1 » Thu Sep 07, 2017 10:36 am

HI

I have recently purchased this pair of salt dishes? I have seen this London 1802 mark AK attributed to Abstinando King, do you agree?

Interestingly one is marked on the side of the base & the other underneath. I was also wondering what kind of use would cause such extensive scratching.

They measure 9 cm across & 6 cm tall & weigh a hefty 162 grams. One bowl still has remnants of the gilding.

Thanks In Advance

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agphile
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Posts: 414
Joined: Mon Nov 30, 2009 12:18 pm
Location: UK

Re: Abstinando King Dishes?

Postby agphile » Thu Sep 07, 2017 12:03 pm

Yes, I agree on the maker.

Salt is very corrosive if left in contact with silver. I would think the scars are the marks of such corrosion and of vigorous attempts to get rid of it.

Interesting to see a pair marked so differently but I'm afraid I don't have any intelligent explanation or observation to offer. I am not even sure where salt cellars were most commonly marked at this date.

Aguest
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Re: Abstinando King Dishes?

Postby Aguest » Thu Sep 07, 2017 2:49 pm

I believe the difference in markings has something to do with the "Octagonal Base," I have noticed the same phenomenon with creamers by Hester Bateman with the Octagonal Base. Sometimes you see the creamers side-marked, and sometimes you see the creamers with the hallmarks on the bottom of the base. I have no explanation either, and I always found it strange. This instance is a bit stranger, given the pair of salt cellars which are hallmarked in different places, you would think the assay master would choose the same place to mark objects of an identical nature.

agphile
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Posts: 414
Joined: Mon Nov 30, 2009 12:18 pm
Location: UK

Re: Abstinando King Dishes?

Postby agphile » Thu Sep 07, 2017 4:59 pm

The maker's mark is applied first before the piece is submitted for assay so it would seem the differing placement of the marks started in King's workshop.


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