Sampson Mordan

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Sampson Mordan

Postby dognose » Sun Jul 15, 2007 11:57 am

It is recorded that in 1833, Sampson Mordan and his partner Gabriel Riddle were employing fifty workers in the manufacture of Mordan's patented "Ever-Pointed Pencil" in their workshops at 22, Castle Street, City Road, London.
Sampson Mordan (b.1790-d.1843) entered his first mark at Goldsmiths' Hall in 1823 as a small-worker and a second mark in partnership with Riddle in 1824 as plate-workers, the partnership was disolved in 1836. He then entered a third mark on his own, again as a smallworker in 1837.

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Postby dognose » Mon Mar 30, 2009 4:26 am

An Interesting advertisment by Gabriel Riddle from 1837 following the disolution of his partnership with Sampson Mordan the previous year.

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Postby MCB » Mon Mar 30, 2009 2:13 pm

Hello Trev,
For information Grimwade page 283 shows Gabriel Riddle registering a rounded end rectangle as his own mark in 1837. Culme's London Directory suggests Riddle was out of the business by 1851.
Also the SM mark originally registered by Sampson Mordan continued to be used by his descendants to circa 1890.
Regards,
Mike
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Postby dognose » Mon Mar 30, 2009 3:59 pm

Hi Mike,

Thanks for putting some more flesh on these old bones.

Regards Trev.
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Gabriel Riddle

Postby JHT » Thu Apr 09, 2009 3:28 pm

Hi my first post here:

I've recently been clearing out my garage and discovered an old writing box. There are no discernible markings other than the inkwell lid which bears the markings

G RIDDLE . LONDON

with an embossed crown on the top and

RIDDLE'S REVOLVING

with a similar crown (although etched as opposed to embossed) on the underside of the lid.

I have been scouring the internet (admin edit - see Posting Requirements) and this is the first site I have found which seems to have any knowlede whatsoever.

Did Riddle's company also make writing boxes or is it likelier that they just supplied the inkwell to some-one else. Unfortunately, the box has no other accessories but there are document and paper compartments and a set of holders for what could be pencils or possible even a sailing masters calipers?

If anyone could shed any light on this I would be ever so grateful.
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Postby dognose » Thu Apr 09, 2009 5:08 pm

Hi,

Welcome to the Forum.

It would be good if you could post some photos of this piece.

Is the inkwell silver?

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Postby JHT » Thu Apr 09, 2009 7:41 pm

No, inkwell itself is glass with a heavy screw top, I don't think it is silver as there is no hallmark but whatever material it is, it has become pretty blackened with age. I think it is most likely that the centre piece (with the embossed crown and company name) is silver and encased in some sort of other material (sorry, I am most definitely not a metals expert)

I did find a very similar piece online by Mosley circa 1835 - I don't know if it is appropriate to post the image as it was from a personal collection - but I'll sort out some decent snaps of mine tomorrow and post them.

John
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Postby dognose » Sun May 17, 2009 7:26 am

Mordan advertisment from 1838.

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Postby dognose » Mon Jun 01, 2009 7:01 am

"Mordan Everpoint" advertisment from 1931.

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Re: Sampson Mordan

Postby dognose » Tue Jul 06, 2010 1:22 pm

Another advertisement from Sampson Mordan, this time from 1843.

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Sampson Mordan - London - 1843

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Re: Sampson Mordan

Postby dognose » Tue Jul 27, 2010 1:48 pm

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S. Mordan & Co. - London - 1835

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Re: Sampson Mordan

Postby MCB » Wed Jul 28, 2010 1:40 pm

Here are a few more details on Sampson Mordan.

As mentioned in the introduction to this topic Sampson Mordan was born around 1790 but research of the various English genealogy web sites fails to trace details of his parents etc. These records are not wholly complete however.

In his book on London Silversmiths and Goldsmiths 1838-1914 John Culme records that Sampson Mordan was apprenticed to John Bramah the famous inventor of patent locks. Wikipedia notes that Bramah also patented the first elastic form of ink reservoir for a fountain pen, hence, no doubt, Sampson’s interest in writing requisites.

There is no trace on web sites of Sampson Mordan’s date of marriage but he has been noted as having six children all born in London, their mother’s name Elizabeth; daughter Elizabeth who was born 1810, sons Sampson Junior 1814, Francis 1817, Augustus 1820, Charles 1822 and daughter Emma 1824. Interestingly all six were christened on the same day on 12th July 1828 at St Luke’s in Old Street London.

Wikipedia notes that in 1822 Sampson with his partner John Isaac Hawkins filed the first Great Britain patent for a metal pencil with an internal mechanism for propelling “lead” forward during use. The advertisements pictured above give an indication of the many other goods Sampson produced thereafter. The business was noted for well engineered top quality.

There is no record of Sampson senior on the 1841 UK Census nor is there a record for his wife Elizabeth. It is possible she had died earlier but Sampson did not pass away until 1843. His absence on the Census day is the more intriguing because both younger sons Francis and Augustus are mentioned at 22 Castle Street which was the family business address whereas the youngest two children are not.

Sampson senior was buried on the 9th of April 1843 in Highgate Cemetery. Sampson junior and Augustus carried on their father’s business from 22 Castle Street.

Those interested in the later history of S Mordan & Co may wish to read pages 330-1 of Volume 1 of John Culme’s book.

Mike
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Re: Sampson Mordan

Postby dognose » Sat Jul 31, 2010 3:40 am

Sampson Mordan died at 4, Emmett's Cottages, Hornsey Road in 1843, aged 54, of apoplexy.

Elizabeth, his wife, survived SM1 by nine years and at this time she was noted as living at 9, Bedford Terrace, Upper Holloway.

Francis and Augustus shared an appartment at the 22, City Road address. At the time (1841) they were both clerks working for the company.

Upon the death of their father, the firm was run by SM2 and Augustus, Francis established his own business, Francis Mordan & Co., SM2 had retired to Paris by 1880, he died in Paris in May 1881, leaving his share of the business to Augustus. Later directors include Edmund George Johnson, Harry Lambert Symonds, Horace Stewart and James Pulley.

Of the other children, Elizabeth married Robert Woodcock and Emma married William Pamplin Penn.

By 1925, the sole director was Margery Doris Symonds and in December 1941 the City Road premises were destroyed by emeny bombing and the firm ceased trading. The patents are now held by the Yard-o-Led company, which is now owned by Letts-Filofax.

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S. Mordan & Co. - London - 1831

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Re: Sampson Mordan

Postby dognose » Mon Oct 04, 2010 11:27 am

An example of a combination pen/pencil by Sampson Mordan and Gabriel Riddle.

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Photos courtesy of Michael

The maker's mark would be the one noted by Arthur Grimwade on page 284 and registered at Goldsmiths Hall on the 30th April 1824. Grimwade described the mark as 'SM.GB, oblong' and you can see how the error occured.

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Re: Sampson Mordan

Postby Bayoubottles » Mon May 02, 2011 11:13 pm

I have searched for 25 years to determine the age of the teakettle ink (Fountain ink) and you have solved this puzzle. I note the advertisement of Sampson Mordan and the 1836 advertisement by Gabriel Riddle for new and improved fountain inks. I have a teakettle ink with G Riddle London on a silver meadalion which is attached to the top of the ink. It is cut glass with cobalt blue over clear glass and very beautiful.
Teakettle ink (fountain ink, original British name for the type ink bottle) date from 1836 and i will happily answer any posts regarding this G Riddle teakettle ink. I also have other teakettles where the medallion has been removed and the top of the bottle has a cut circle where the medallion would have originally been.
Thanks so much
Joe
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Re: Sampson Mordan

Postby dognose » Wed May 04, 2011 3:29 am

Hi Joe,

Welcome to the Forum.

It would be good to see some images of your fountain ink. Can you post some?

Regards Trev.
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Re: Sampson Mordan

Postby silverly » Wed May 04, 2011 12:11 pm

Just for whatever it is worth, I find a "Samson Mossler" in the 1841 census for St Mary Islington East, Middlesex. The handwriting looks more like Samson Morden to me. Sampson's occupation is listed as a machinist and his age is given as 50. Also in the household are Elizabeth age 50 and Charles age 19. Charles's occupation is clerk. In the same census Samson Mordan age 27 is listed in St Leonard Shoreditch, Middlesex with the occupation manufacturer.
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Re: Sampson Mordan

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 18, 2011 2:49 pm

Sampson Mordan and Wanklyn's patent "Turbine" striker

A silver match-box is always an agreeable present to give to a smoker. The fault with most silver match-boxes, however, is the tendency of the striker, at the bottom of the box. to clog and prevent the ignition of matches struck on it. The celebrated firm of silversmiths, Messrs. S. Mordan and Co., Limited, of 41, City Road, London, E.C., have just started to supply silversmiths and jewellers with a new box which entirely overcomes this difficulty. This new match-box is fitted with an original patent, known as Wanklyn's patent "Turbine" striker, which rotates automatically and cleans itself instead of filling and presenting' a smooth surface to the match. It can be used equally well in dry and wet weather, and is practically indestructible. Another feature is that each box is made out of one piece of silver. It would be difficult to think of a more useful Christmas gift at a moderate price for a smoker.

Source: Country Life - 1908

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S. Mordan & Co.- London - 1908

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Re: Sampson Mordan

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 07, 2012 4:58 pm

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Sampson Mordan - London - 1835

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