Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Thu May 17, 2018 2:23 pm

GOUGH & SILVESTER

Birmingham


William Henry Brown - (London agent)


EMBEZZLEMENT OF £2,000

At the Clerkenwell Police Court, on Tuesday, Wm. Henry Brown was charged before Mr. Barker with embezzling, at 30, Ely-place, Holborn, various sums of money, amounting to about £2000, belonging to his employers. Messrs Gough and Silvester, electro-platers and silversmiths, Birmingham.

A solicitor stated that he should have to ask for a remand. When the prisoner absconded, he went to America, and had but recently returned and given himself up. He had written to the firm a letter, of which the following is a copy : -

London, Oct. 8, 1864. Gentlemen, After a sojourn in the United States, where I have undergone some terrible hardships, and finding success impossible without a character and with such a weight on my mind, as a guilty conscience, the thoughts of those dear to me at home, I have, without informing anybody, returned for the express purpose of giving myself up, and throw myself on your merciful consideration.

I cannot appeal to you for mercy, knowing as I do the natural aggravation which must ever exist, owing to your severe loss I shall therefore go to Scotland-yard, and give myself up to Sergeant Robinson, or some other constable.

I am, gentlemen, yours obediently,

W.H. Brown.

P.S. - My friends are quite in ignorance of this step.

He (the solicitor) might say that the prosecutors had been telegraphed for to Birmingham, but as yet had not had time to attend. A reward of £50 had been offered for the apprehension of the prisoner.

Mr Geo. Carley, watch manufacturer, said that he resided at 30, Ely-place, and that Messrs. Gough and Silvester had warerooms in his house. He was formerly agent for them, and the prisoner was his clerk. The latter succeeded him in the agency, and absconded about six months ago. He had since heard that he had embezzled sums of money to the amount of £2,000.

Police-sergeant Beard swore that on the previous day the prisoner came and asked for him, and said he wanted to give himself up for embezzling a large sum of money from his employers. The prisoner said he did not wish to ask any questions or to make any defence.

Mr. Barker remanded him for a week.


Source: The North Wales Chronicle - 15th October 1864

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Mon May 21, 2018 2:44 pm

THE GOLDSMITHS AND SILVERSMITHS COMPANY

London


Thomas John Willoughby - (Foreman watchmaker)


STOLE 91 WATCHES

At Clerkenwell Sessions, London, today Thomas John Willoughby, 48, watchmaker, was sentenoed to two years' hard labour for stealing 91 watches and a bracelet, value £1,100, the property of the Goldsmiths and Silversmiths Company (Limited), of Regent-street, after obtaining a situation, as foreman by a false character. Willoughby cleared the safe in his charge and absconded to Liverpool. Previous convictions were proved against prisoner at Bristol, Manchester, Liverpool, and Cardiff.


Source: Evening Express - 1st August 1905

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 15, 2018 5:41 am

RICHARD JACK

Edinburgh


Archibald Jack - (Son and Journeyman) (b.1820)
John Gray Jack - (Son and Apprentice) (b.1825)

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 23, 2018 10:59 am

W.J. DINGLEY Ltd.

Birmingham


Image
Source: British Jeweller - February 1968


Sidney Smith, noted as working for W. J. Dingley Ltd. in 1968

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Sat Aug 25, 2018 2:20 pm

JOHN ALEXANDER FETTES

Glasgow


William M. Duncan - (Apprentice)
Harry Falconer - (Apprentice)

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 26, 2018 5:31 am

FREDERICK BERRY

London

Richard Cope - (Journeyman jeweller)


OBITUARIES

Nov. 12 - At Westminster Hospital, from injuries received Oct. 20, while attending the shop of his master, Mr. Berry, jeweller, Parliament-street, when his skull was beaten in with a life-preserver by a ticket-of-leave man, named Robert Marley, aged 36, Richard Cope: for some time he progressed favourably, and while in full possession of his faculties was able to identify his assassin, who was taken to his bedside for that purpose, when his deposition was taken by a magistrate and properly attested. The coroner's inquest returned a verdict of "Wilful murder" against Robert Marley.


Source: The Gentleman's Magazine and Historical Review - January 1857



THE MURDEROUS OUTRAGE IN PARLIAMENT STREET

The man calling himself Jenkins, but who has been recognised as a ticket-of-leave man, who, under the name of Morley, had been convicted of burglary and sentenced to seven years' transportation, was brought up on remand at Bow street, on Tuesday, charged with murderously assaulting Richard Cope, journeyman to Mr Berry, jeweller, of Parliament street. A fresh witness, named Hickling, deposed that he was passing Mr Berry's shop on Monday evening, the 20th ult. There were several persons standing by the door, and witness also paused. He saw a man inside striking some one, but could not see the person struck. Presently a man came out smoking a cigar, and carrying a parcel wrapped in black leather, or a leather bag. He closed the door after him, but it “went open" again, and then witness saw a man lying on the floor bleeding. Witness then joined in the pursuit, and did not lose sight of prisoner till he was taken in Palace-yard. He was not more than twenty yards behind him. He believed the prisoner to be the same man,—Henry Croft deposed that he resides at Wokingham, and was formerly in the police. At the time in question he was passing along Parliament street with a young woman, when he heard a faint cry of murder from the shop of Mr Berry. He thought at the time that it was a woman's voice. He saw the prisoner in the inside, in the act of striking a blow, but could not see the person struck. The prisoner struck over the counter, and repeated the blow four or five times. Some one who was standing by said “It is only a man beating his wife,” and walked quickly away. The prisoner, when he left off striking, took up a parcel, and left the shop smoking. Witness watched him till he got about ten yards off, and then looked into the shop again. He then saw the man behind the counter push up the flap of the counter with both hands, and then fall back covered with blood. Some of the bystanders went in, brought the man out of the shop, and carried him to the hospital. Witness saw the prisoner when he was brought back to the shop, and he was quite certain he was the same man.—Mrs Walsh, deposed that about ten o'clock on Monday night she was going with her husband from Millbank street to Parliament street. She found the life-preserver now produced on the foot-pavement near Canning's statue. She took it home and kept it till Wednesday, when her husband read of this case in the papers. She then went to the station and gave it up. It was now in the same state in which she found it. This weapon is considerably larger than the usual size of such instruments, loaded at both ends, and strongly bound in leather., which is cut in two or three places.—Mr Jardine remanded the prisoner till Wednesday next.—About seven o'clock in the evening, Cope, who had not previously articulated a single word, was heard by one of the nurses in the ward where he was lying in the Westminster hospital, to whisper his ability to eat something. Immediately information was given to Mr Marshall, the house-surgeon, who, after seeing the patient, communicated with Mr Walker, chief of the police, with a view to obtain the attendance of a magistrate at the bedside of the injured man. Mr Jardine, accompanied by Mr Burnaby, the chief clerk at Bow street, accordingly attended, and the prisoner was also brought to the hospital. Mr Marshall having satisfied himself that Cope was in a perfectly rational state, and able to articulate, Mr Jardine and the other officials were introduced. Mr Burnaby took a position close to Cope's bedside, and explained to him the occasion of the visit. The prisoner was then brought in and placed at the foot of Cope’s bed, in a position allowing full view of his features. In reply to the question by Mr Burnaby whether he knew the man standing at the foot of the bed, Cope after surveying him for a few moments, saintly ejaculated—“Yes.” Mr Burnaby pursued the question by inquiring how he knew the prisoner, upon which Cope replied “That is the man who struck me.” Mr Burnaby next asked Cope whether he could tell what it was he was struck with ? He said: “A life preserver.” Mr Burnaby then asked the sufferer whether he could tell how many blows had been given to him by the prisoner, Cope appeared anxious to reply more fully to this inquiry, but, after an effort, was only able to articulate a simple “No.” Mr Burnaby, after a short pause, next asked Cope whether the prisoner had spoken to him before commencing to attack him. The unfortunate man, whose utterance up to this point had been gradually becoming more imperfect, appeared excited by the last question, and in reply muttered some inarticulate sounds from which nothing could be gleaned. It was thought advisable not to ask Cope any further questions, and he was now required to affix his mark to the deposition upon which he then tremblingly affixed his attestation. The prisoner was removed. After Mr Jardine had retired, Mr Walker, expressed a desire to put one other question to Cope, being desirous to ascertain whether he had any previous knowledge of his assailant. It was done with all due care, and the patient, having had half an hour's repose, replied by a distinct negative. Cope had a disturbed night after his assailant had been confronted with him on Tuesday evening, and was not so well next day. Considerable risk was run in subjecting him to the excitement consequent upon his examination, and Mr B. Holt, senior surgeon at the hospital, who happened to be absent from London at the time, has expressed his disapproval of the patient's having been subjected to so trying an ordeal while in the extremely critical condition in which he still continues.

Source: The Examiner - 1st November 1856


THE PARLIAMENT STREET MURDER

Joseph Jenkins, alias Robert Marley, aged 39, surgical instrument maker, was indicted for the wilful murder of Richard Cope.

The crime for which the prisoner was indicted had caused the greatest sensation. The murder was committed in a shop, so small that every passer-by can see the whole of it—in one of the principal thoroughfares, and so placed, that persons within can scarcely speak with full voice without being heard in the street—and at an hour of the evening when the streets are full of passengers.

The prisoner, a tall man of respectable appearance, pleaded “Not Guilty,” in a loud voice.

Mr. Frederick Berry.—I am a jeweller, and reside at Stafford Row, Pimlico. My shop is in Parliament Street. It projects beyond the house, and there is no room over it. The shop is not more than 3 feet deep. The door of the shop swings in two parts, and I generally sat on the left-hand side as people entered, and the deceased worked on the opposite side to me. The counter in the shop is about two feet wide, but the deceased had nothing before him but a work board, and he was separated from the shop by a glass partition and door. The deceased had been in my service for 10 years. My custom was to have the stock of jewelry packed up every night and put in a secret and secure place. No one slept upon the premises. The deceased and I generally left the shop together, but if I went first he used to bring the keys and a box in a blue bag to my house. If we left together he used to carry the bag and box. This box was empty. I was at the shop on the night of the 20th of October. The stock consisted of watches and jewelry that were exposed in the window for sale. I went away from the shop a few minutes past 8 on the 20th of October, leaving the deceased behind in the usual place where he worked, behind the glass door. I returned to the shop a few minutes past 9 on the same evening, and I then found the deceased on my side of the shop. I stayed about ten or twelve minutes, and when I left the shop was still open and the gas burning, and the deceased had commenced packing up the stock and had put away the watches left to repair. The stock on my side was all in the window and on the counter. I brought a flag basket with me containing a codfish when I came back, and I placed it in front of the counter, and told the deceased to bring it with him to my house when he came with the keys. This basket could have been seen in the place where I left it when the door was opened. The deceased was a cripple and a very small man. He ought to have been at my house by about 20 minutes to 10, but he did not come, and the next morning I heard he was at the hospital. Nothing was stolen from the shop but the fish and the basket.

George Lerigo.—I live at Chapel Street, Oxford Street, and am a milliner's porter. I was passing Mr. Berry's shop from Westminster Bridge on the night of the 20th of October, about half-past 9 o'clock. My attention was attracted by hearing a groan from the inside of the shop. It was like that of some one who was suffering. I saw three men standing close to the door of the shop, and apparently looking in. The righthand side of the door was open about an inch, and quite sufficiently to enable any one to see the counter of the shop. I asked the men what was the matter, and they said it was a man and his wife quarrelling, and I walked on, leaving them behind. When I had got about six yards on, and not quite so far as the mews at the back of Richmond Terrace, I returned, not feeling satisfied with the answer the men had given me, and went again to the door of the shop. All three men were still there. I opened the door. There was a gaslight in the shop. I saw the prisoner standing on the lefthand side and leaning over the counter with a life-preserver in his hand, with which he was striking the deceased, who was crouched down beside the counter. He struck him on his bare head, on the left side, and I saw him strike three or four blows. I then appealed to the passers-by for assistance, and at this time the three men I had first seen had gone away. The persons I applied to stopped and looked in, and the prisoner turned round from the man he was striking, picked up a parcel from the floor and a piece of lighted cigar from the counter, and went out of the shop with the life-preserver still in his possession. I did not notice what sort of parcel it was that the prisoner picked up. I paid more attention to the man's face. When he came out of the shop he turned to the left towards Westminster Bridge, and I followed him. I said to the people about, “There he goes, won't you secure him 2" But they did not interfere, and I pursued the prisoner alone. He went on to Derby Street, and turned down there into Cannon Row, and when he saw I was following him he began to run, and I called out “Stop him, stop him 1" When the prisoner got to the end of Cannon Row he crossed Bridge Street and ran down the court opposite towards Palace Yard, and he was stopped in that passage by a waterman named Allen. He was not out of my sight until he got to the passage leading to Palace Yard. I did not see the parcel in the prisoner's hand when he began to run, but he had it up to that time. After the prisoner was secured I went back to the shop and saw the deceased, and he was taken to the hospital. There was no one in the shop but the prisoner and the deceased. There certainly was no woman in the shop. As we were taking the prisoner back to the shop we passed the deceased, who was being carried to the hospital. I am quite sure the prisoner was the man I saw striking the deceased.

Mr. James Gipling said—I am a grocer living at Liverpool Street, King's Cross. I was passing along Parliament Street on the night of the 20th of October, about 25 minutes past 9 o'clock, and I saw several persons standing outside Mr Berry's shop. The door of the shop was partially open. I saw a man inside the shop in the act of striking at something behind the counter. I then saw the man take up a parcel from the floor, and put a cigar in his mouth and come out. I could not recognise the man who came out. He walked away towards the bridge, and, as the door was opened, I saw a man lying on the floor and bleeding from the head, and I followed the man who had come out of the shop. He turned down Derby Street, and at that time I was about 20 yards behind him ; and I observed that he had a parcel in his hand. He turned to the right, and when he found he was pursued he started off, running towards Palace Yard, and I went after him until he was stopped, and only lost sight of him as he turned into Palace Yard.

Henry Croft gave evidence of the same circumstances.

Allen, attendant at the hackney-carriage stand in Palace Yard deposed to hearing the cry of “Stop him!” and saw the prisoner running. He stopped him. He then had a lighted cigar in one hand, but nothing in the other. It is a most singular coincidence, that this witness, whose capture of the prisoner was the essential point of the case, was the brother-in-law of the murdered man.

Mrs. Mary Walsh said – On the night of the 20th of October I was in Palace Yard, near Canning's statue, when I picked up a life-preserver. It was lying on the foot pavement next to the statue. I afterwards gave the life-preserver to the police inspector.

Mr. H. Burnaby, the chief clerk at Bow Street, deposed that he went with Mr. Jardine, the magistrate, to the Westminster Hospital on the 28th October, and an examination of the wounded man was taken in the prisoner's presence. He took down the statement in writing, and read it over to the prisoner, who had an opportunity of hearing all that took place. Witness asked him if he wished to put any questions to the wounded man, and he said nothing, but shook his head.

The statement was put in and read. It was as follows:– “I know that man. He is the man who struck me. I don't know how many blows he struck me, but he struck me with a life-preserver." The medical officers described the wounds of the deceased; they were such as would be inflicted by a life-preserver—there was a compound fracture of the skull. The poor man lingered till the 9th of November. The surgeon described the appearance presented by the skull upon the post-mortem examination, and stated that the immediate cause of death was the deposition of matter upon the lungs, but he said he had no doubt that the state of the lungs was occasioned by the injury to the head.

Several medical witnesses of repute were called by the Crown to prove that it was a very common result of violent injuries to the head that such a state of the lungs as appeared in this case should be presented. The exact modus operandi, one of them said, was a question in dispute among the medical profession, but he believed that they were all agreed upon the fact.

It was, in fact, the case of the prisoner that the poor man had died from disease of the lungs, and not from the injuries he had received.

The jury, however, were quite satisfied by the evidence of the medical men, and after short deliberation found the prisoner “Guilty.” The prisoner, who was a very practised criminal, having been already transported and released on ticket of leave, received his sentence with firmness, and thenceforward to the day of his execution maintained a composed demeanour. He had probably contemplated nothing more than to stun the poor shop-man as a preparation for plundering the shop; but he seems to have been perfectly aware that he had no chance of escaping his doom, and died firmly and with some degree of penitence. It is, however, remarkable that he asserted to the last that he had no accomplices—but that he had accomplices is beyond reasonable doubt. The fish-basket was never produced, nor the black parcel which he held in his hand in his flight—they had probably been passed away to confederates.

It will scarcely be believed that the employer of the boy, Lerigo, discharged him from his service, because his attendance at the police courts interrupted his business. Baron Alderson, however, ordered him to be paid a reward of 20l., and 10l. to Allen.


Source: The Annual Register: Or a View of the History, Politics and Literature, for the Year 1856 - 1857

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 30, 2018 7:42 am

GEORGE KENNING

London


Henry Cox - (Foreman)


At the Guildhall Police Court on Tuesday last, William Hurren, a cabinet maker, was charged with stealing rings and Masonic jewellery to a very large amount from Bro. Kenning's warehouses, Nos. 1, 2, and 3, Little Britain.— Mr. George Clarke prosecuted, and Mr. E. Pratt appeared for the prisoner. Mr. Clarke said that Bro. Kenning was a Masonic jeweller, and in his warehouse were numerous cases in which he exhibited his goods. The prisoner was employed by the manufacturer of those cases, and consequently was frequently in the warehouse. The doors of the cases shut with a spring, but were not locked. In consequence of Bro. Kenning missing some jewellery inquiries were made about it, and the result had been that most of the missing property had been traced to the possession of the prisoner. Bro. Henry Cox, foreman to Bro. Kenning, said that about a fortnight ago he missed some rings and jewellery. The prisoner had been in the habit of coming to the premises on and off for the last 18 months or two years. The cases were unlocked, and shut with a spring. Henry Webb, detective serjeant, said that he and Detective Trafford apprehended the prisoner on Monday afternoon, in Cow-cross. He told him the charge would be on suspicion of stealing a number of gold rings and a quantity of Masonic jewellery from Bro. Kenning's premises, within the last month, and pledging the same at a pawnbroker's in the Holloway-road. He said he knew nothing about it; he had not stolen any, neither had he pawned any. He took him to Snow-hill police-station, where he found on him a number of racing bills, a Masonic gold ring, and 3s. 7d. in money. Witness told him that he pawned a diamond ring on Saturday, and he replied that that was his own ring and had nothing to do with what he had pawned there besides. Bro. Kenning was taking stock, and he already found a large deficiency. Sir Andrew Lusk remanded the prisoner for further evidence.

Source: The Freemason - 30th June 1877

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Thu Oct 11, 2018 5:52 am

HENRY GRIFFITH & SONS

Birmingham


Frederick Burgess - (Traveller)


THEFT OF JEWELLERY

A MAN CHARGED WITH VARIOUS ROBBERIES


At North London Police court on Thursday John Moore, alias Hennessy, 37, jeweller, Hornsey, was charged on remand with stealing £400 worth of jewellery from a shop at Gravesend, and £3,000 worth from the premises of Reid and Sons, jewellers, Newcastle. A further charge was now preferred against accused of stealing a bag, containing £3,000 worth of jewellery, belonging to a traveller of Henry Griffiths, wholesale jewellers, of Birmingham. Witnesses on Thursday identified certain jewellery found in the possession of the prisoner. Of this jewellery £50 worth was the proceeds of the Gravesend burglary, and another £50 worth the proceeds of the Newcastle coup. Frederick Burgess, traveller to Griffiths and Son, Birmingham, deposed, with reference to the third charge, that the bag was stolen at Lime-street Station, Liverpool. He had placed it down while sending a telegram, and had put his foot on it. He had occasion to move for a moment, and when he went to put his foot on the bag again it had disappeared. Witness now identified jewellery to the value of £300 as part of the contents of the bag. Roben Brilliant, a jeweller, of Stoke Newington, who purchased the above lot from prisoner for £140, said when he discovered Griffiths's initials on it he informed the police. Prisoner was committed for trial for stealing and receiving the property actually recovered.


Source: The Weekly Mail - 30th September 1899

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Re:

Postby silverly » Sat Oct 13, 2018 12:34 am

dognose wrote:Thomas Corbett (Grimwade 384)....There would appear to be a major error in Arthur Grimade's details in the above entry. Peter Platel appears to be the anglicized version of Pierre Platel (Grimwade 2200), but Platel was not Free until the 14th June 1699 and therefore could not have become a Master until after that date, and a turn over for anything less than the death of a Master in the last six months of an apprenticeship is highly unlikely.

Fortunately enough and by pure luck as I was looking for something else, I came across a snippet of information that solves the above mystery. In the Middlesex County Records, Sessions Book (524) October 1695, there is this small entry 'Thomas Corbet, Son of Simon Corbet. Discharged of his Apprenticeship to David Williams, Silversmith, a Frenchman, upon proof that the said Williams did unmercifully beat the said Corbet'

David Williams is undoubtedly David Willaume I (Grimwade 512, 3192-4, 3859), indeed he is described as David Williams when he was granted his Freedom in January 1693. Of course this does not tell us who Corbett was apprenticed to for the remaining four years of his training, but almost certainly it was not Platel...


My guess on this matter is that Peter Platel is one of the Goldsmiths that examined Thomas Corbett before he was granted freedom. Platel's name is on the reverse of Thomas Corbett's indenture contract to Mathew Gyles. However, a turnover for Thomas Corbett does not appear to be mentioned on the reverse of his contract as is quite common. His turnover, if it was recorded, may be on a separate document that has not been sighted yet.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 23, 2018 5:01 am

CHARLES DREYFUS

London


Charles Lait - (Gold polisher)

See: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=30091&p=162200#p162200

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Tue Nov 06, 2018 3:45 am

DENIS BOURSIN

London


John Melin - (Apprentice)


John Melin, Apprentice to Denis Boursin, Silversmith, at the Golden-Angel in Longacre, ran away from his said Master on Tuesday the 3rd of December, if he returns to his Master, he shall be kindly received, or whosoever secures and brings him to his said Master, shall have reasonable Charges, with Thanks. Whosoever entertains him, be it at their Peril. He is about 17 Years of Age, small Stature, short black Hair, a Scar in his Left Cheek, very much freckled in the Face.

Source: The London Gazette - 3rd December 1723

See: viewtopic.php?f=74&t=33787

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 02, 2019 1:06 pm

JACOB FRENCH & SONS

London


Alfred Thomas Jackson - (Journeyman jeweller)
Francis Ploughman Roberts - (Apprentice)


At the Central Criminal Court, on Wednesday, before Baron Pigott, Alfred Thos. Jackson, 22, jeweller, was tried upon an indictment charging him with the wilful murder of Francis Ploughman Roberts. The facts of this case have been very recently before the public. The prisoner and the deceased were employed at the workshop of Mr. French, a manufacturing jeweller, carrying on business at No. 6, Newcastle street, Clerkenwell, the former as a workman, the latter as an apprentice. The men were in the habit of stopping to work after the usual business hours, and were paid for overtime accordingly. At seven o'clock in the evening, which was the time for leaving off work, the door of a passage through which the men had to pass, on leaving the workshop, to go through the house, was fastened, and those who stayed after the time had to be let through by some one in the house. On the evening of the 24th of November, the prisoner, the deceased, and three other men stopped to work overtime, and two of them left at eight o'clock and one stopped until ten o'clock. Up to that time it appeared the prisoner had not passed through the house. About half-past ten a witness, named Edward Thomson, who resided in a house at the side of Mr. French's, and whose back window looked on to the workshop, heard some cries of distress, and opened his window, and then heard a cry of "Murder!" which came from the door of Mr. French's workshop, where there was a light burning. He looked that way and saw the prisoner leave the door having what appeared to be a stick in his hand. He and Mr. French, who had also heard the noise, went into the shop, and found the deceased in a leaning position against the door, bleeding very much and in a very weak state. The prisoner was apprehended, and denied having assaulted the deceased or stayed after the other workmen. It appeared that the deceased had been in the habit of lending money to his fellow workmen from time to time, more especially to the prisoner, and had several promissory notes in the prisoner's handwriting for sums lent to him, which he kept in his pocket book but when deceased was found the pocket-book was missing. There was also some evidence that some jewellery, at which deceased was at work, was missed after deceased was taken to the hospital. Mr. Sleigh addressed the jury on behalf of the prisoner; and several witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character. The jury returned a verdict of "Manslaughter," and the prisoner was sentenced by Baron Pigott to penal servitude for life.

Source: The Monmouthshire Merlin and South Wales Advertiser - 17th December 1864

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 16, 2019 4:55 am

HANCOCK & Co.

London


Frederick Curtis - (position unknown)


ROBBING A COURT JEWELLER

At the Old Bailey, on Monday, Frederick Curtis, an apparently well-educated young man, pleaded guilty to a charge of stealing jewellery to a considerable amount, the property of his employers, Messrs. Hancock and Co., court jewellers, 39, Bruton-street. The prisoner appeared to have been a "fast" man in every respect. He was well known in various sporting circles, and had been in the habit of selling and pledging jewellery. In one letter to a friend, "Dear Bob," he announced that the "case" was hopeless, the amount of "tombstones" (pawnbrokers duplicates) in his possession, amounting to £180. The prisoner was sentenced to five years' penal servitude.


Source: South Wales Daily News - 25th November 1873

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 25, 2019 3:50 am

WILLIAM COMYNS & SONS, Ltd.

London


Daniel Spencer - (Silversmith)


Maces were originally war instruments used for organizing mayhem, but from the 13th century have been carried by the sergeant-at-arms of the
organization. In the European and in the older American universities it symbolizes the dignity and authority of the president and the corporation or the board of trustees.

Stetson's mace, designed by Episcopalian Canon Edward Nason West of New York, was presented to former president J. Ollie Edmunds in 1956 at the May Commencement ceremony. Canon West, of the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine, is a leading authority on heraldry and the ancient symbolism on which much academic protocol is based. The mace is described here by the artist:

"Stetson's mace is designed so that anyone could easily place the university's geographic location and chartering power. The palm buds from Florida's state seal form a base for the head of the mace. The legend around the bowl makes the particular institution's motive clear. The crenulations constitute what is known as a "canting device" since they are a play on the Latin word "stet" - of Stetson - meaning "may it stand." The anchor, heart and cross-repeated twice in ornamenting them - are taken from the seal of the City of DeLand. From the top of the mace rises the shield of the university. The mace takes its basic shape from the mace of the Baptist Long Parliament, thus signifying the Baptist roots of the university."

The mace was made by Daniel Spencer, master gold and silversmith, of William Comyns & Sons, Ltd., London. The firm was established in 1645 and examples of their craft work can be found in St. Paul's Cathedral and Westminster Abbey.


Source: Stetson University Commencement Program 6th May 2005

Trev.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Wed May 01, 2019 12:52 pm

GARRARD & Co.

London


Robert William Martin - (Assistant Cashier)


TWO YEARS OF FRAUD

For two years Robert William Martin, thirty-five, an assistant cashier, who appeared at Bow-street yesterday, had been stealing money from his employers, Messrs. Garrard and Co., jewellers and silversmiths, Haymarket, W. Martin, whose salary was £175 a year, recently absented himself without leave. The prisoner's accounts were immediately investigated, with the result that serious defalcations were discovered. It was now stated that the total deficiency amounted to £550. When arrested he said that he had a lot of domestic trouble. Sentence of six months' hard labour was passed.


Source: Evening Express and Evening Mail - 30th December 1908

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby mk209 » Tue May 14, 2019 3:35 am

Jason Holt

Moses Moses

Apprenticed in 1762 to Jason Holt of Plymouth, Jeweller, for £80. 10s.

Source: Arnold - Apprentices of Great Britain 1710-1773.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Sat May 25, 2019 6:22 am

JOHN ELKAN

London

H. G. Taylor - (Manager)


JEWEL ROBBERY

A DARING AFFAIR AT A LONDON SHOP


At the Guildhall, London, on Wednesday John Halford, 40, no fixed abode, was charged with breaking and entering the shop of Mr. John Elkan, jeweller, of 35, Liverpool-street, and stealing eight gold chains, value £20.-Police constable Kerridge said that about 8.30 o'clock on the previous night he heard a smash of glass in Liverpool-street, and, looking to see where it had taken place, he saw the prisoner standing in front of Mr. Elkan's shop with the chains in hie hand. Witness took him in custody. A large pane of thick glass had been smashed. Prisoner said. "I broke the window with this knife," taking it from his pocket, and added, "I was out of work." Mr. H. G. Taylor, manager of the shop, said when he heard the smash he rushed out with the assistant and saw a large quantity of jewellery lying on the pavement. He instructed the assistant to take charge of that whilst he went after the prisoner, who was walking off with eight chains in his hand. He brought him back and gave him in custody. It was impossible to say if any of the jewellery was missing until stock had been taken. The damage done to the window was about 50s.—A remand was ordered.


Source: Weekly Mail - 21st February 1903

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Sat Aug 31, 2019 4:47 am

GARRARD & Co.

London


G.W. Hindley - (Apprentice)


ART-WORKMANSHIP COMPETITION, 1868

Engraving on Metal. - After an arabesque by Lucas Van Leyden, by G. W. Hindley, apprentice at Messrs. Garrard and Co., 29, Panton- street, Haymarket, S.W. (Prize of £2, being a portion of the Goldsmith's Company's prize).


Source: Journal of the Society of Arts - 14th February 1868

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Thu Sep 05, 2019 1:03 pm

BARBER, CATTLE & Co.

York


John Harrison - (Foreman)

John Harrison, Late Foreman to Messrs. Barber, Cattle and Co, Working Goldsmith, Jeweller, & Chaser, 43, Coney Street, York, (opposite the George Inn) Most respectfully informs the Nobility, Gentry, and Public in general, that he has taken the above situation, for the purpose of working in the various branches of his Business, humbly hoping, that 25 years experience in the Firm of Messrs. Barber, Cattle, and Co (15 of which as principal Workman), will entitle him to a share of public Patronage and Support, which it will be his constant endeavour to merit, by strict attention, unctuality, superior Workmanship, and reasonable Charges. N.B. Diamonds, Pearls &c, set to any Pattern - Mourning Rings neatly made on the shortest notice. Diamonds, Pearls, Gold and Silver, bought, sold or exchanged.

Source: Yorkshire Gazette - 17th March 1832

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