Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

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dognose
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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Jul 06, 2012 6:54 am

John Liford (Lyford, Lifford)

John Liford was granted his Freedom by the Goldsmiths' Company in 1723. He was recorded as a Mathematical Instrument Maker and had served his apprenticeship under William Collier as from 1716. His father, also named John Liford, was a Cordwainer, of Islington, Middlesex. He was recorded as being located at 'Euclid's Head', near the new church, Strand, London, in 1730, and at 'Over against the New Church in the Strand' London, from 1746 until 1748.

John Liford took the following apprentices:

John Simpson - 1732
Henry Linley - 1735/6
Samuel Humphreys - 1737
Hermes Hitch - 1737
Joseph Hitch - 1745
William Jenkins - 1745
Benjamin Church - 1750, turned over to his father, Seth, in 1755
John Holbrook - 1751, turned over to John Mitchell of the Clockmakers' Company (undated)

Trev.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 06, 2012 8:05 am

James Kirk

James Kirk was recorded as a Seal Engraver and Toyman, he was granted his Freedom from the Goldsmiths' Company by patrimony in 1765. He was the son of John Kirk, who was recorded as a Scale Maker and Engraver, and James succeeded him in his business. James Kirk's business was located at 'The Grotto', 52, St. Paul's Churchyard, London, from c.1761 until c. 1793. His private residence was Chandos Street, Covent Garden, London.

James Kirk was known to have taken one apprentice:

Richard Holden - 1771

Trev.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 17, 2012 4:46 am

Richard Jenkins

Fore Street, Exeter

Richard Jenkins was admitted into the Exeter Goldsmiths' Company in 1769, and performed the role of Warden to the Company on many occasions during a prolific working career of around forty years. He was also noted as serving as Mayor of Exeter in 1787 and 1800. Richard Jenkins died in 1806.

He was known to have taken two apprentices:

William Tapley - Free 1795
Edward Byrne - Free 1802

Trev.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Oct 24, 2012 8:57 am

William Birkwood

William Birkwood was recorded as a Mathematical Instrument Maker located at Crane Court, St. Peter's Hill, Thames Street, London during the period 1790-1831. He was a member of the Goldsmiths' Company and served his apprenticeship under Joseph Hitch.

He was known to have taken the following apprentices:

Samuel Couling - 1790
James Murray - 1802
Thomas Bunker - 1806
Jeremiah Stevens - 1809
George Jackson - 1815
Matthew G. Phare - 1817
Thomas Fair Edwards - 1819
Samuel Rumbell - 1826

Trev.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Oct 29, 2012 11:28 am

John Margas

Further detail on John Margas can be found here: viewtopic.php?f=74&t=30829

He was known to have taken the following apprentices:

Edmund Say - 1743 (at London)
Nathaniel Rawlins - 1751 (at London)
James Jameson - 1753 (at London)
William Collinridge - 1753 (at London)
Seacombe Mason - 1760 (at Dublin)
Charles Molloy - 1760 (at Dublin)
Henry Edgeworth - 1760 (at Dublin)
James Mercy - 1765 (at Dublin)

Trev.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 22, 2013 6:01 am

Alexander Gardner

Alexander Gardner was apprenticed to William Aytoun on the 23rd May 1744. Freeman 19th November 1754. Burgess 18th December 1754. Appointed Assay-master to the Mint 1767, in succession to Robert Gordon. Deacon to the Incorporation of Goldsmiths of the City of Edinburgh 1772-74. He was joined by his son, and former apprentice, John, to form the business of Alexander Gardner & Co. in 1797. He died in Edinburgh on the 11th April 1803 and was buried in the Greyfriars Cemetery in that city on the 14th April 1803.

The known apprentices of Alexander Gardner:

James Dickson - 1755
Robert Martin - 1757
John Muir - 1760
James McSymmond - 1762
William Hamilton I - 1765
John Hector - 1769
John Adam Hunter - 1770
John Gardner - (Son) 1773
Alan Burret - 1775
Allan Russell - 1775
Alan Burrell - 1775
James MacKay II - 1783
David Craig - 1784
Alexander Grant - 1792
George Lerro - 1797

As Alexander Gardner & Co.:

William Clark - 1797
Alexander Brodie - 1802


Trev.

Follow-up: The Incorporation of Goldsmiths of Edinburgh record John Gardner apprenticed to his father on the 23rd February 1773 and presume him to become the junior partner in Alexander Gardner & Co., but the below may cast a different light:

Image

Image

Image

Trev.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 23, 2013 9:25 am

Robert Cruickshank London and Montreal

The known apprentices of Robert Cruickshank during his Montreal period:

Michael Roy - 1791
Frederick Delisle - 1795
René Blache - 1796
Peter Bohle - 1800
Narcisse Auclair - 1805

Further detail of Robert Cruickshank can be found at: Robert Cruickshank

Trev.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 29, 2013 9:43 am

Henry Corry (Grimwade p.493)

James Chassey - Journeyman

James Chassey, an occasional journeyman to Mr. Moreland (sic), a silversmith, for stealing several ounces of silver, his property, and in his absence melting them in his house into an ingot, the better to dispose thereof in the trade. He was also indicted for stealing several ounces of silver, the property of Mr. Corry, a silversmith, whom he also worked for, but was not tried thereon. It appeared he had sold within a small space of time a great number of ingots, some weighing not less that 20 or 30 ounces.

Source: The London Chronicle for 1762 - Jan. 16-19

Old Bailey trial refers: t17620114-29

Trev.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 23, 2013 4:03 pm

John Turner of Dublin

Thomas White - Apprentice

......Mr. Pocklington reported, That the Members appointed to go and examine Thomas White, a Prisoner in Newgate, convicted for Clipping and Coining, had been, and examined him accordingly; whose Examinations were in delivered in at the Table: Where the same were read; and are as follow; viz. That the said Thomas White said, He was born in the County of Pembrook; and put Apprentice to John Turner, a working Goldsmith, Watchmaker, and Engraver, in Dublin, in the Kingdom of Ireland, for Seven Years; where he did learn the said Arts; and, after his Apprenticeship was out, he lived in Limerick for about a Year; and from thence he came to London ; where he wrought with one Mr. Mercheant, a Watchmaker: That, about Four Or Five Years since, he was committed to the Gatehouse for Debt........

Source: Journals of the House of Commons - Volume 11 - 1693

Only one apprentice was previously noted as being bound to John Turner, that of Thomas Rasin, son of Edward Rasin of Dublin, Victualler, in 1697.

John Turner was granted his Freedom of the Dublin Goldsmiths' Company in 1685 and died in 1704.

Trev.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 15, 2013 4:31 pm

Carden Terry of Cork

Samuel Fryer (Apprentice)

24 July 1795 - That Samuel Fryer, silversmith, having served Carden Terry, be admitted freeman at large.

Source: The Council Book of the Corporation of the City of Cork: From 1609 to 1643, and from 1690 to 1800 - 1876

The last mention of Samuel Fryer that I can find is in 1830, where he is described as 'then dead' (Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society - 1906)

As well as John Williams, of whom there is various information on this webite, one Robinette, first name unknown, was also noted as an apprentice to Carden Terry. Robinette came to Cork from Tullagh, Co. Waterford in 1791, and may have the son of Roger Robinette of that county who was dead by 1781.

Trev.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 19, 2013 3:22 pm

George William Adams

Edward John Carter (Journeyman)

Before the Common Serjeant, Edward John Carter, aged thirty-four, silversmith, pleaded guilty to an indictment charging him with stealing divers quantities of silver, value £70, the property of George William Adams, his master. The Common Serjeant sentenced him to twelve months hard labour.

Source: The Pall Mall Gazette - 24th November 1868

Trev.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat May 18, 2013 9:36 am

Joseph Rodgers & Sons of Sheffield

An image taken on the 4th April 1911 of the workman of Joseph Rodgers & Sons of Sheffield that had in excess of fifty years service to the company.

Image

The names, ages, and length of service in years:

Back row: (reading from left to right)

William Carnell - 59 - 50
John S. Dewsnap - 65 - 53
James Marsh - 67 - 53
Thomas Booth - 63 - 50
Samuel Dungworth - 68 - 54
James Platts - 64 - 50
Herbert Beardshaw - 61 - 50
Alfred Hall - 73 - 50
Arthur Swift - 65 - 52
Robert Jubb - 66 - 54
Frederick Swift - 63 - 50
A. Simpson - 63 - 51

Centre row:

Hedrick Radford - 64 - 53
William Ward (Merrill) - 65 - 55
Henry Mason - 67 - 55
James Fenton - 66 - 55
John Senior - 68 - 55
Henry Raines - 73 - 57
Benjamin Brown - 69 - 56
Charles Jerrison - 66 - 56
Mark Webster - 71 - 54
George Swift (Grinder) - 63 - 54
Frederick Parkin - 62 - 53
Herbert Styring - 70 - 58
Henry Taylor (Matthewman) - 65 - 51

Front row:

William Smith - 70 - 57
George Dickinson - 66 - 57
Henry Clark - 65 - 52
Ed. Shelton - 72 - 62
Ed. Gear - 71 - 57
John Swift - 71 - 60
Thomas Langworth - 73 - 60
William Bradwell - 71 - 61
George Swift - 71 - 60
George Swinden - 75 - 50
John Moxey - 69 - 57

Trev.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby burnisherboy » Sat May 18, 2013 11:33 am

Trev, Wonderful image and information! Amazing to see the Hands both named and dated and to realise their age when they started work. Any takers today for working full time in the trade from age 9! Burnisherboy.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri May 24, 2013 6:47 am

The Known Apprentices of Richard Sheldon of Edinburgh

John Colquhoun : Apprenticed 1st February 1816. The son of Adam Colquhoun, Lapidary, Edinburgh.
Thomas Smith : Apprenticed 1816.
John Donaldson MacKenzie : Apprenticed 15th Janurary 1817. The son of Alexander McKenzie, Fishing Rod Maker.
George Grant : Apprenticed 11th June 1818. The son of the late Robert Grant, Farmer at Greenrig, Berwickshire.
William Aikman : Apprenticed 12th April 1819. The son of Andrew Aikman, Painter in Edinburgh.
James MacIlriach : Apprenticed 1819.
George Laing : Apprenticed 1819.
John Laurence Mitchell : Apprenticed 1819. The son of Laurence Mitchell, Engraver.
Primrose Bruce : Apprenticed 11th December 1819. The son of William Bruce, Banker.
Benjamin Doughty : Apprenticed 28th December 1819. The son of Benjamin Doughty of Whitechapel, London.

Trev.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby MCB » Sat May 25, 2013 9:43 am

Joseph Rogers & Sons of Sheffield

As the London silversmiths listed in Grimwade’s book have been given their fair share of Forum space it seems only proper to introduce some of the gentlemen of John Rogers & Sons work force who appear in the photograph above.
A short biography of those who chose to stand on the back row:
William Carnell (1852-1935). Born William James Carnall, the son of John, a table knife cutler. 1911 a table knife cutler.
John S Dewsnap (1846-1915). Born John Samuel Dewsnap, the son of George, a razor grinder. 1911 a cutlery manager
James Marsh (1844-1916). Born James Wright Marsh, the son of Jonathan, a boot and shoe maker. 1911 a spring knife cutler.
Thomas Booth (1848-1912). The son of Richard, a coal heaver. 1911 a pen knife cutler.
Samuel Dungworth (1837-1913). He was actually born in 1837, the son of Samuel, a seal maker. 1851 aged 14 years, a saw handle maker. 1911 a table knife cutler.
James Platts (1847-1924). The son of James, an edge tool grinder. 1861 an edge tool grinder. 1911 a pen knife cutler.
Herbert Beardshaw (1850-1928). Born Herbert Robert Beardshaw, the son of James, a table knife cutler. 1871 a cutler. 1911 a cutler eraser and desk knives.
Alfred Hall (1838-1920). The son of Joseph, a table knife cutler. 1851-71 records are unobtainable. 1911 a spring knife cutler.
Arthur Swift (1846-1917). Born Arthur Neil Swift, the son of Samuel, a spring knife cutler. Brother of William Frederick Swift (see below). 1861 a spring knife cutler. 1901 a spring knife cutler. 1911 record is missing.
Robert Jubb (1845-1912).The son of Robert, a table knife cutler. 1861 a table knife cutler. 1911 a butcher’s knife haft maker.
Frederick Swift (1848-1914). Born William Frederick Swift, the son of Samuel, a spring knife cutler. Brother of Arthur Neil Swift (see above). 1861 a spring knife cutler. 1911 a spring knife cutler. Died in Wortley, Yorks.
A Simpson (1848-1914). Possibly born Alfred Richard Simpson, the son of William, a steel plate engraver. 1871 a scissors fitter. 1911 a scissors filer.

All were born and died in Sheffield unless otherwise noted. The information was obtained from UK Census and England & Wales Births & Deaths records.

Mike

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 26, 2013 4:01 pm

The Known Apprentices of James McKay of Edinburgh

John Milligan: Apprenticed in c.1803 - son of Andrew Milligan, Watchcase Maker and Silversmith, Edinburgh
Adam Elder: Apprenticed in 1804 - son of Adam Elder, Baker, Edinburgh
James Sligh (Slight): Apprenticed in 1805 - son of George Sligh, Coldingham, Berwick
Robert Tait: Apprenticed in 1805 - son of Robert Tait, Porter Seller, Edinburgh
George Handysid Keir: Apprenticed in 1810
John Richardson I: Apprenticed in 1811 - son of Thomas Addison Richardson
John Clark II: Apprenticed in 1811 - son of Robert Clark, Baker
James MacKay IV: Apprenticed in 1812 - son of William Mackay, Silversmith
B. Shaw McConchie: Apprenticed in 1814
William Beattie: Apprenticed in 1815
George Sutherland: Apprenticed in 1816 - John Sutherland, Merchant, Edinburgh
John McGrew: Apprenticed in 1816 - son of Alexander McGrew, Baker, Edinburgh
James MacKay: Apprenticed in 1818 (Son of James McKay)
Robert MacKay: Apprenticed in 1818 (Son of James McKay)
David Pollock II: Apprenticeship transferred to James Mackay from William Scott Peat in 1818 - son of James Pollock, Brass Founder
John Fraser III: Apprenticed in 1818 - son of the late John Frazer, Carpenter, Honduras
Fraser Stewart: Apprenticed in 1821 - son of Donald Stewart, Box-Keeper at the Theatre Royal, Edinburgh

James McKay gave up the manufacturing side of his business in c.1825 and entered into partnership with David Cunningham as 'Mackay & Cunningham' , his remaining apprentices were transferred. He did later take on a further two apprentices:

Alexander Mackay: Apprenticed in 1828 (Son of James McKay)
Henry Jamieson: Apprenticed in c.1830 - son of Henry Jamieson, Silversmith’s Wright

Trev.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 28, 2013 2:50 pm

The Known Apprentices of Alexander Henderson of Edinburgh

James Monro I : Apprenticed in 1794 - Son of the late David Munro, Cook
William Watson : Apprenticed in 1799
Hugh Calder : Apprenticed in c.1802 - Son of Hugh Calder, Wright
William Davidson : Apprenticed in 1806
John Lawrie (Laurie) (Lowrie): Apprenticed in 1810 - Son of James Laurie, Wright (John Lawrie was later to become Alexander Henderson's partner in the firm of Henderson & Lawrie)
James Mathie : Apprenticed in 1814
James Martin : Apprenticed in 1814
Samuel Weir : Apprenticed in 1817
Patrick Sutherland : Apprenticed in 1817 - Son of John Sutherland, Labourer
James McFarlane : Apprenticed in 1820 - Son of Robert McFarlane (James McFarlane was originally bound to William Auld, but following the death of Auld, McFarlane's indentures were transferred to Alexander Henderson)

Trev.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Jul 01, 2013 3:09 pm

The Known Apprentices of Francis Howden of Edinburgh

James Gibson Greig: Apprenticed in 1811 - Son of John Greig
John Howden: Apprenticed in 1814 - Son of Francis Howden, Silversmith
John Lyon Smith: Apprenticed in 1810
Thomas Brown III: Apprenticed in 1786 - Son of the late James Brown, Vintner
Nicol Ritchie: Apprenticed in 1799 - Son of George Ritchie, Coachman
Robert McLean: Apprenticed in c.1804
Colin McGregor: Apprenticed in 1803 - Son of the late Colin McGregor, Gardener

Trev.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Jul 16, 2013 6:20 pm

James Stobie of Perth

James Dudgeon (Journeyman)

James Dudgeon, a journeyman jeweller, in the employment of Mr Stobie, Perth, charged with stealing a large number of working utensils and other valuable articles from his employer. It was stated in extenuation by prisoner's counsel, who pled not guilty, that he merely took the use of the articles to assist him in his work at home after the usual working hours. The evidence, however, showed that many of the articles had been pawned. He was found guilty, and sentenced to 7 years transportation.

Source: Dundee Courier - 15th October 1851

Trev.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Jul 17, 2013 9:54 am

Hamilton & Inches of Edinburgh

Edward Hamilton (Foreman Silversmith)
William Samuel (Journeyman)

Work on Singapore's new Civic Mace is going ahead rapidly at the workshops of the old established jewellers and silversmiths in Edinburgh, who were commissioned to undertake the intricate carving and chasing.
Mr. Edward Hamilton, 48 year old foreman silversmith is in charge of the work on the beautiful silver mace, which will incorporate the arms of the City of Singapore, the Straits Settlements and Sir Stamford Raffles.
A member of the 87 year old firm said that they were approached to do the work after the Singapore authorities had seen and admired photographs of the St. Andrew's University Medical Faculty Mace made by the firm four years ago.
The firm, Hamilton & Inches, recently moved their showrooms from the world-famous Princes Street to dignified George Street. But the silversmiths' workshops are still at South Rose Street Lane between the two streets.
Said Mr. Hamilton: "There is six months' work in the mace, which will be exhibited in Edinburgh and London before going to Singapore."
Designer is Mr. C. d'O. Pilkington Jackson, well-known Edinburgh sculptor, who designed the Royal Scots memorial in Princes Street Gardens.
The donor of the mace, Mr. Loke Wan Tho, sent photographs of a sea eagle or osprey alighting on its nest to the silversmiths, and has requested that the bird, with outstretched wings, should form part of the design of the mace.
The craftsman who is doing the chasing on the mace was stationed at the flying-boat base at Seletar with 230 Flying Boat Squadron during the war. He is 46 year old Mr. William Samuel, who has been with the firm for 16 years. Like Mr. Hamilton, he is one of the few first-class silversmiths remaining in Scotland.
He said: "I would very much like to be at Singapore when the completed mace is handed over."
The firm of Hamilton & Inches are also making the two silver caskets which are to be presented to Earl Mountbatten and Lady Mountbatten by the City of Edinburgh when they receive the Freedom of the City.


Source: The Straits Times - 27th October 1953

Trev.


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