Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 15, 2013 6:11 am

S.T. & E. ELLISON

56, South Methven Street, Perth

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S.T. & E. Ellison - Perth - 1891

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S.T. & E. Ellison - Perth - 1905

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 16, 2013 7:30 am

A. HENNING GmbH

Sebastianstrasse 36-37, later, Kommandantenstrasse 16, Berlin SW. 19


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A. Henning GmbH - Berlin - 1902

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A. Henning GmbH - Berlin - 1904

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A. Henning GmbH - Berlin - 1907

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 19, 2013 5:22 am

JAKOB GRIMMINGER

Schwäbisch Gmünd, Württemberg

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J. Grimminger - Schwäbisch Gmünd - 1903

An example of a silver handled walking stick by Jakob Grimminger of Schwäbisch Gmünd:

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This business was established in 1893 and dissolved in 1991, its production of hollowware was continued by Gayer & Krauss.

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dognose
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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 30, 2013 3:58 pm

FOLLMER, CLOGG & Co.

414, Broadway, New York, and Lancaster, PA.

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Follmer, Clogg & Co. - New York - 1898

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Follmer, Clogg & Co. - New York - 1899

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Follmer, Clogg & Co. - New York - 1914

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Follmer, Clogg & Co. - New York - 1914

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Follmer, Clogg & Co. - New York - 1914

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Follmer, Clogg & Co. - New York - 1915

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dognose
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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 04, 2013 11:30 am

CHARLES HILL

Burgess Street Horn Works, Sheffield

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Charles Hill - Sheffield - 1879

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MCB
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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby MCB » Fri Apr 05, 2013 5:03 am

Charles Hill

He was born in Sheffield in 1826.
The UK Census records show him in 1851 living in Nether Hallam, Sheffield as a wood turner employing 6 men, still there in 1861-81 as an ivory and horn turner, the latter record showing he employed 4 men.
He was still in Nether Hallam in 1891 and retired.
There was a death of a Charles Hill born in 1826 registered at Ecclesall Brierlow, Sheffield in 1899 which may be relevant.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 09, 2013 5:14 am

W.H. RONALD

44, Argyle Street, Glasgow

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W.H. Ronald - Glasgow - 1865

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 16, 2013 8:21 am

BROPHEY UMBRELLA COMPANY

266, King Street West, Toronto, and Montreal

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Brophey Umbrella Co. - Toronto - 1913


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UMBRELLA DESIGNS FOR SPRING

A patented novelty for umbrella handles is just being put on the market. It consists of a slide with nickel ends through which passes the wrist strap for carrying the umbrella when not in use. Both slide and strap are half an inch wide. When the strap is over the wrist the slide is pushed up close to the wrist securing the strap so that it cannot slip over the handle without the slide is moved down again. A similar idea is worked out in large sliding beads with silk strap handles. The former style comes attached to black enamel handles, black with white stripes and black with silver ends, all of which are very neat. The silk handles are slightly more dressy with their natural wood handles, some with jade tortoise, ivory or agate ends and the sliding beads to match. Handles are mostly of the 7-inch length.


Source: Dry Goods Review - January 1917


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UMBRELLAS

Many Novelty Handles for the Holiday Trade–Bakelite, Silver, Leather and Wood in Smart Designs.

Buyers who are looking for something smart and new in umbrella handles for the holiday trade will not be disappointed this season. There are many novel combinations of materials into interesting designs. Among the newest to be seen are those made of Bakelite, a very hard kind of "Parisian" ivory. Bakelite is obtained in various colors which make it especially attractive to complete a smart street costume. Navy blue, green, black and ivory are favorite shades and the two first are shown in spot and stripe effects on a black or ivory ground. Handles may also be obtained with these materials in wrist rings which continue to attract buyers. One model was all of the white Bakelite intricately carved and with a hole through which a ring to match or any kind of loop might be placed. Another smart handle was of mission ebony with black and jade colored Bakelite trimming. Leather is not new for wrist straps but it is extremely popular in tan and natural colorings as well as black and white. Sometimes the handle is wound with strips of leather to correspond with the carrier strap. Leather in all its variety is perhaps the best seller of any trimming at present.

There is again a good assortment of metal handles with either metal wrist rings or chains. One style has a thumb ring and chain. Another has sterling silver mounting on greystone finish or marble finish wood. These fancy wood handles are attractive and continue selling very well. In a more exclusive style there is a model with sterling silver mounting and a carrier made of very fine sterling mesh braid. Another had Russian engraving or Tulla work on the silver mounting. This engraving is touched with a dark dye or enamel which throws out the design of the carving or engraving in strong contrasts of light and dark and is very effective. Gold handles and mountings sell to some extent for Christmas gifts but are giving place to the less expensive but possibly more attractive novelties described.


Source: Dry Goods Review - October 1917

William Allard Brophey founded the Brophey Umbrella Company in 1907, the company stayed in his hands until 1936, when ill health forced his retirement, he died in 1938. The company's name was restyled to Telesco Brophy Ltd. in the early 1960's, and merged with the German umbrella manufacturer, Knirps, in the late 1970s.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 25, 2013 4:03 pm

JOHN MORLAND & SONS

50, Eastcheap, London Bridge, London


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John Morland & Sons - London - 1862

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John Morland & Sons - London - 1865

The business was in the hands of Charles Coleby Morland (b.1839,d.1908) in the latter part of the 19th century until his retirement in 1895.


The character of Charles Morland has been summed up by a man who knew him well, in the familiar but significant words of the Apostle, as " not slothful in business, fervent in spirit, serving the Lord." He has been spoken of as a typical Quaker, calm, courageous, clear-sighted and reliable. All who were brought into contact with him bear witness to the uprightness of his life, to the excellence of his judgment, to the value of his counsel. In Croydon, where he spent more than sixty years of his life, he will be long remembered as the type of a good citizen, actuated always by a strict sense of duty and by an unselfish readiness to devote himself to the service of the town. The fourth child of John and Hannah Morland, he was born in London in 1839, and he was only five years old when the family removed to Croydon. After his education at York and at University College, London, he entered his father's business–John Morland & Sons, Umbrella Makers–and in this he remained, eventually becoming head of the firm, until his retirement in 1895. Happy in his home surroundings, the effect of early influences was very evident in his subsequent career. His parents before him were, as he in turn proved himself to be, active and untiring in work for the interests of the Society, and for the benefit of these about them. In 1862, Charles Morland married Jane Fryer, and settled in the house in Morland Road, Croydon, which was to be his home for the remainder of his life. Here were born his fourteen children, of whom all but one, eight sons and five daughters, survive him. He was soon called upon to take part in public affairs, becoming in 1868 a member of the Local Board, a position which, with the exception of two years, he held until the incorporation of town in 1893. He was elected a member of the first Council, was chosen again in 1886 and 1889; and having been made an Alderman in 1891 he filled that office until the time of his death. In a large and rapidly growing town like Croydon, membership of the governing body is no sinecure, especially for a man like Charles Morland, keenly interested in local affairs, always at the public service, and sparing neither time nor trouble in his efforts to promote the best interests of his fellow-townsmen. At the time of his death he was a member of no fewer than five Committees of the Council ; the Committee of the Water Supply, the Visiting Committees of the Mental Hospital, the Libraries, and the Smallpox Hospital, and the Education Committee. Education was a subject that specially interested him. He was a Trustee of the British School, and he devoted much care and thought to the training of the children of the poor. It was only last spring that he retired from the Board of Guardians, on which he had served, part of the time as Chairman, for more than twelve years. In 1903 he was elected Mayor of Croydon, a position he filled with grace and dignity. On the bench his sterling character was of especial value. His sympathy, patience and sense of justice made him an ideal magistrate. The Clerk of the Court, in speaking of the loss which the town had sustained in the death of Charles Morland, characterised the late Alderman as firm, fearless and just; as a man who always listened courteously to the arguments on both sides of a question, but whose decision, arrived at after careful deliberation, was not to be shaken. " To discuss a question with him," wrote the Mayor of Croydon, " was always (whether the question was vital or trivial) to breathe as it were the pure mountain air of unsullied rectitude, and sane, unclouded judgement. One stood by his word as by a rock, immovable, steadfast, unalterable. Over us who move at a lower level, bent by currents of sentiment to and fro, this strong personality, careless of opinion, if his own were fixed, fearless of criticism, if his own were satisfied, exercised a high and noble influence. If we could not rise to his standard, we were drawn to look up towards it, nay, it may be even to move some few feeble steps up that steep hill. I thank God for this simple, kindly, true, just, merciful, strong man. And my thankfulness is the predominant emotion even at this moment of deep sorrow for his loss–for it is the cause of the sorrow – the thankfulness is the great light, which casts the heavier sorrow-shadow the greater its brightness. And I call to mind that while shadows and sorrows are transitory things, this thankfulness and this great light will always endure for us who loved Charles Morland." Such a man was, as might have been expected, a keen and valued worker for his own Society. Always regular in his attendance of meetings, both for worship and for discipline, he took a most useful part in Monthly, Quarterly and Yearly Meetings. He was an active member of the Meeting for Sufferings, of the Friends' Home Mission Committee, and of the Peace Society, of which for some years he was Chairman. He showed the same interest in Education in the Society of Friends as he did in the town of Croydon. He was for many years on the Committee of Croydon and Saffron Walden School ; he also served on that of Ackworth School, and he was a member of the Central Education Committee. " For twenty years past," writes a Friend who knew him well, " it was my privilege to be brought into close relation with Charles Morland in the work of the Society. Ever ready to devote time and energy to it, he wasted neither. He was rapid in forming his conclusions on broad issues, and, when occasion required, he proved equally competent in the management of details. Clear and concise in the expression of his judgment, he used no unnecessary words, but, in a business meeting, went straight to the point, never hesitating to deal with a question because of any difficulties attending it. " He made an admirable Chairman of Committees, and showed great tact in handling delicate matters, always, moreover, keeping his Committee to the business before it. As a private counsellor he was discreet and kindly, and no one who asked his advice and opinion ever had reason to regret it. He was a judicious Elder and Overseer, bringing his strong, practical common sense to bear upon the exercise fo a somewhat difficult office." Such is a brief and imperfect record of a good man's life, a life well-lived, a life of strict integrity and stainless honour, of faithful service for the good of others.

Source: The Annual monitor - Obituary of the Members of the Society of Friends in Great Britain and Ireland - 1908

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 26, 2013 12:07 pm

THE GOLDSMITHS' STOCK COMPANY OF CANADA Ltd.

48, Yonge Street, Toronto

Some images of gold cane heads supplied by the Goldsmiths' Stock Company of Canada in 1890:

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Goldsmiths' Stock Company of Canada Ltd. - Toronto - 1890

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Goldsmiths' Stock Company of Canada Ltd. - Toronto - 1890

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Goldsmiths' Stock Company of Canada Ltd. - Toronto - 1890

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Goldsmiths' Stock Company of Canada Ltd. - Toronto - 1890

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 28, 2013 7:12 am

D.M. MELDRUM & Co.

13 & 15, Reform Street, Dundee

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D.M. Meldrum - Dundee - 1871

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D.M. Meldrum & Co. - Dundee - 1885

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Wed May 01, 2013 4:28 am

ANDREW SHEWAN

Kirk Street, Peterhead

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Shewan - Peterhead - 1852

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Thu May 02, 2013 3:33 am

RICHARD LEBRAM

Berlin and Pforzheim

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Richard Lebram - Berlin - 1902

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Richard Lebram - Berlin - 1905

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Tue May 07, 2013 4:45 am

J.F. FRADLEY & Co.

860, Broardway, Union Square, New York

An advertisement from J.F. Fradley & Co.'s Canadian distributors, Zimmerman, McNaught & Lowe:

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Zimmerman, McNaught & Lowe - Toronto - 1882

Founded by Joseph Frederick Fradley in 1866. Fradley had served his apprenticeship as a Chaser under Wood & Hughes.

J.F. Fradley & Co. were exhibitors at the Exposition in Paris in 1889.

Joseph Fradley retired in 1902, but the business was continued by his son, George F. Fradley. The company existed until at least the mid 1930's.

For further details of J.F. Fradley & Co. including an example of their mark, see: http://www.925-1000.com/ax_Fradley.html

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Thu May 09, 2013 1:50 pm

DAWES & FANNING

98-100, Franklin Street, New York

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Dawes & Fanning - New York - 1877

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sat May 11, 2013 1:51 pm

QUEEN VICTORIA'S WALKING STICKS

Since the Queen has found it necessary to use a walking-stick, she has been the recipient of many canes. Her friends, relatives and subjects have seized upon every possible occasion to present her with a new cane. One entire room of her private suite is stocked with special gifts. Her Majesty's is a collection of priceless value. There are solid gold sticks, silver sticks, exquisitely engraved; sticks that are a marvel of the carver's heart, and sticks that contain jewels that would move even a New York millionaire to envy. Queen Victoria has leaned more heavily on her stick of late years, using it to cross the room even, instead of only on walks about Windsor Castle, and after a long, tiring ceremony. She always places her cane against her chair, and when she rises it is the duty of the highest court official present to hand it to her. The story of the prank played upon her Majesty by the son of the Duke of York is not generally known. While at Windsor not long ago, the Queen, who is not fond of Court ceremonies when she is in retirement, had dismissed her attendante, who had withdrawn to an arbour near by. She was very much interested in her favourite pastime, knitting socks for the Prince of Wales, when that small embodiment of mischief, her great grandson, slipped away. with her cane and "played horsey" with it over the lawn. He had to be captured before the Queen could enter the house. There Her Majetsy proceeded to teach him that even the future King of England cannot tamper with the dignity of the present powers that be. Of recent years Her Majesty's subjects have hoped in vain to see her use their gifts. She has used only one cane; which is of great historic value, having been presented to Charles II by one of his merry Court. Very properly it was cut from an oak tree. When Charles accepted the gift it had a plain gold head, which was round and apt to hurt the hand if the cane was called upon to support much weight. It was said about the Court recently that Her Majesty used no longer the historic stick. This is not true; only the top has been changed. An idol, which graced the temple of an ill-fated Indian prince, has been added for a handle. This is exquisitely wrought in ivory, on an infinitesimal pedestal of alabaster. The eyes and forehead are jewelled, and on the tongue is the rarest of rubies.


Source: The Coburg Leader - 20th January 1900

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Mon May 13, 2013 9:16 am

W.W. HARRISON

405, later, 1149, Broadway, New York

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W.W. Harrison - New York - 1902

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W.W. Harrison - New York - 1904

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Mon May 20, 2013 3:28 am

T.L. MAXWELL & BROTHER

42, Cortlandt Street, New York

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T.L. Maxwell & Bro. - New York - 1884

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sat May 25, 2013 10:38 am

JOHN BULL

Albert Steam Rope and Whip Works, Luton, Bedfordshire

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John Bull - Luton, Bedfordshire - 1901

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri May 31, 2013 12:08 pm

HUGH M'DONALD

84, later, 7, Mill Street, Alloa

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Hugh M'Donald - Alloa - 1877

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Hugh M'Donald - Alloa - 1887

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