Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Wed Oct 22, 2014 4:16 am

W. UPTON & SONS

276, Mile End Road, and Ely Terrace, Mile End, London



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W. Upton & Sons - London - 1894

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri Oct 24, 2014 4:36 am

JOHN BOULTON & Co.

Newton Street, Birmingham



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John Boulton & Co. - Birmingham - 1907

John Boulton was previously in the employ of G. & J. Zair (see above post).

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri Oct 31, 2014 11:02 am

A. PARKER

12, Brandon Street, Hamilton, Scotland


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A. Parker - Hamilton - 1879

At the sign of the Red and Gold Umbrella.

This would be Absalom Parker.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 05, 2014 9:18 am

W. BRITTAN

68, Hawkridge Street, and, Robin Hood Street, Nottingham


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W. Brittan - Nottingham - 1895

Established in 1826.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Thu Nov 20, 2014 1:46 pm

STOOPACK & GARBAT

298, Church Street, later, 37-41, East Eighteenth Street, later, 62-70, West 14th Street, New York


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Stoopack & Garbat - New York - 1899

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Stoopack & Garbat - New York - 1914

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Stoopack & Garbat - New York - 1916

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Stoopack & Garbat - New York - 1922

The business of Jacob Stoopack and Isaac M. Garbat.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 04, 2014 2:20 pm

ALLISON & LAMSON

405, Broadway, New York


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Allison & Lamson - New York - 1906

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Allison & Lamson - New York - 1909

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Mon Dec 08, 2014 3:13 pm

THOMAS SMITH

Bell Yard, 58, City Road, London


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Thomas Smith - London - 1886

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 11, 2014 12:22 pm

SIEGEL, ROTHSCHILD & Co.

126-128, Fifth Avenue, New York, and, Baltimore and Howard Streets, Baltimore, and 1011, Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, and 717, Market Street, San Francisco, later, 1170, Broadway, New York


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Siegel, Rothschild & Co. - Baltimore - 1914

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Siegel, Rothschild & Co. - Baltimore - 1914

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Siegel, Rothschild & Co. - Baltimore - 1921

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Tue Dec 23, 2014 3:22 pm

H.C. MEYER jr.

24, Mark Lane, London, and Hamburg


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H.C. Meyer jr. - London and Hamburg - 1868

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._C._Meyer_jr.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 02, 2015 1:25 pm

FLETCHER AND SONS

Swanns Yard, Long Row, Nottingham


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Fletcher and Sons - Nottingham - 1880

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sat Jan 03, 2015 3:48 pm

WILLIAM NATHANIEL CRINE

London

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Crine & Shelley - London - 1870

William Crine was noted in 1865 as located at 42, St John Street Road, and Clerkenwell Green, Clerkenwell. By 1868 he was located at 51, King Square, Clerkenwell, and by 1869 in partnership with Shelley at that address. In 1879 he was at 8, Moor Lane, and in partnership with William Wild. Recorded at 2, Harp Court, Milton Street in 1880. Crine appears to leave the business around this time, and is replaced by Nathanial Porter. The business name is retained and Crine returns to partner Wild sometime after 1884. Recorded as Crine, Wild & Co. when their partnership was dissolved in 1890.


Notice is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us the undersigned, Nathaniel Porter and William Wild, carrying on business as Cane, Whip, and Umbrella Mounters, at No. 8, Moorlane and Harp-court, both in the city of London, under the style of Crine, Wild, and Co., has been dissolved, by mutual consent, as on and from the 21st day of October, 1884. All debts due to or owing by the said late firm will be received and paid by the said William Wild, who will henceforth continue to carry on the said business on his own account.–Dated this 21st day of October, 1884.
Nathl. Porter.
William Wild.


Source: The London Gazette - 24th October 1884


Notice is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us the undersigned, William Nathaniel Crine and William Wild, carrying on business as Umbrella and Walking Stick Mounters, at 2, Harp-court, Milton-street, in the city of London, under the style or firm of Crine, Wild, and Co., has been dissolved, by mutual consent, as and from the 1st day of April, 1890.–Dated this 1st day of April, 1890.
W. N. CRINE.
W. WILD


Source: The London Gazette - 8th April 1890

William Crine entered his marks 'WC' contained within an oval punch, on the 13th April 1865, and 'W.C' contained within an oval punch, on the 7th October 1880, both with the London Assay Office.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 07, 2015 3:19 pm

WILD & CARR

12, King Square, Clerkenwell, London

The business of William Wild and Thomas Carr appears to follow on somewhat from that of Crine, Wild, and Co. (see above post), at least as far as William Wild was concerned.

Wild & Carr entered their marks 'W & C' contained within an oblong punch, on the 2nd August 1899 and 6th March 1900 (both as Wild & Co.), and on the 5th May 1902 and 1st February 1906 (both as Wild & Carr).

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sat Jan 10, 2015 7:26 am

WILLIAM WILD & SON

113, Eleanor Road, Hackney, later, 50, Great James Street, Hoxton, later, 65, Fore Street, City, London, later, 44, Stafford Road, Wallington, Surrey


The business of Frederick Charles Wild, presumably the son of William Wild. This business overlaps that of Wild & Carr (see above post), and must be considered a separate entity.

William Wild & Son entered their mark 'F.W.' (Frederick Wild) contained within a rounded punch with concave sides, left and right, with the London Assay Office on the 12th September 1905.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 20, 2015 6:10 am

AARON, SONS, & CO.

35a, Wood Street, later, 18, Jewin Street, later 35 & 38, Aldersgate Street, London, and 1, Coppinger's Row, Dublin



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AARON, SONS, & CO., Umbrella Manufacturers, 18, Jewin Street, London, E.C.; and No. 1, Coppinger's Row, Dublin.
Telegraphic Address :–" Aronicus, London."

About fifteen years since this old-established and successful umbrella manufactory in Wood Street passed into the hands of Mr. B. W. Aaron and his sons. Under the style of Aaron, Sons, & Co., the business was so wonderfully developed and increased that it became necessary, nine years ago, to move into much larger premises in Jewin Street, which have been added to from time to time, but are still none too large for this flourishing business. The warehouse and factory now occupy seven floors; the upper ones of this building are devoted to various manufacturing departments, to fitting-up rooms, covering - rooms, cutting - rooms, finishing - rooms, sample-rooms, entering-rooms, and packing-rooms, etc.

The umbrella and walking-stick department is on the ground-floor. Here every variety of cherry, orange, myrrh, lemon, and pimento canes, along with many other rare and curious specimens, is displayed. On the first-floor are the sunshade show-rooms, the counting-house, and the departments for braces, mufflers, and silk handkerchiefs,–these last-mentioned branches have been recently introduced, and have been found to be a very successful development. The goods here are noticeable for the same style and freshness of pattern which characterises the umbrellas and sunshades. As this Firm are very large buyers in the silk market for their umbrella trade, they are in an exceptionally good position with regard to the production of silk mufflers and handkerchiefs at special prices. The umbrella department contains a very varied show of these goods. Here are umbrellas for every purpose–for carriages, for ladies, gentlemen, and children; the " Clynch," the "Park," the "Olympia," and the "Self-opening" umbrellas are well-known specialties of this Firm. Further on there are departments for those particular kinds of sunshades and sun-umbrellas in use in those very tropical countries from which the idea of a sun-screen was originally borrowed.

We are unable to mention every sort of umbrella to be seen here, but we note that the varieties stretch from the simplest possible parasol, such as we may count a dozen of in any London street, to the most gorgeous canopy which some African chief may have ordered to be sent to his distant country to become the delight of his own court and the envy of his neighbours.

Since the time when Jonas Hanway, in Queen Anne's reign, walked down Cheapside with his parapluie above him, vast changes have been made in the manufacture of these goods, and no firm can be said to have displayed a greater fertility in this direction than Messrs. Aaron, Sons, & Co.

This Firm have been remarkably fortunate in gaining popular favour by their original designs, clever mechanism, taste, and artistic merit. Amongst their latest patents is the useful one-hand "Selfopening " umbrella, mentioned above. By an ingenious contrivance this opens itself when the ordinary spring in the stick is touched, so leaving the other hand at liberty–a great advantage when one is alighting from a carriage or omnibus. No doubt this invention will be very largely used in the future. Another novelty is the " Clynch," of which we give an illustration. This contrivance combines the notch, cap, and ferrule, and not only enables a novice to cover an umbrella in the easiest manner, but by simply unscrewing one can shorten it so as to pack easily in an ordinary portmanteau.

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The home business of this Firm extends to every part of the United Kingdom, besides which they export goods to every country of the world. The present partners are Messrs. Alfred G. and John A. Aaron, under whose energetic and skilful management the business prospers exceedingly. The inventive skill and excellence of quality shown in the Firm's goods have won them many prize medals at the exhibitions; at the Inventions Exhibition in 1885, and at the Exhibition at Calcutta in 1884, at Antwerp in 1885, and at Adelaide in 1887. &c.

When we consider the many peculiarities of our English climate, with its sudden changes, "from grave to gay, from lively to severe," its frequent rain, and not infrequent shine ; and when, too, we take note of the untiring enterprise and ingenuity of this Firm,–the one suggesting or insisting, and the other tempting, every man, woman, and child to carry an umbrella, we cease to wonder at the gigantic strides which this branch of trade is now making.


Source: Wyman's Commercial Encyclopædia of Leading Manufacturers of Great Britain - 1888


Benjamin Wolfe Aaron retired on the 3rd July 1882 and the business was continued by Alfred G. and John A. Aaron. John A. Aaron retired on the 8th December 1890, leaving Alfred to continue alone. He removed to the Aldersgate Street address in March 1892 and traded under the name of the Nair Co.. The business ceased in 1893 upon Alfred becoming bankrupt.

The business entered their mark 'A·A' (Alfred Aaron) contained within an oblong punch, with the London Assay Office on the 9th January 1886. An earlier mark that was associated with the business was 'BWA' (Benjamin Wolfe Aaron, then described as a spoon and fork maker), contained within an oblong punch, with the London Assay Office on the 8th January 1846.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 21, 2015 8:14 am

I. BASTO

Rua Buenos Ayres 108, Rio de Janeiro


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I. Basto - Rio de Janeiro - 1920

Successor to Gonçalves Possas & C..

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 29, 2015 11:22 am

MRS. T. STANHOPE

20, Belvoir Street, Leicester


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Mrs. T. Stanhope - Leicester - 1868

Daughter of the late Edward Amatt.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 05, 2015 8:07 am

HEARN & BRAITSCH

376, Potters Avenue, and 2-12 Melrose Street, Providence, R.I. and 415, Broadway, New York


Hearn & Braitsch, the well-known manufacturers of cane and umbrella heads. Providence, R. L, have commenced the erection of a new factory building at Elmwood in the suburbs. The new structure, which will be about 160x50 feet and four stories high, will probably be ready for occupancy by the middle of July. This move was rendered necessary by the phenomenal increase of their business during the past year.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - June 1890


HEARN & BRAITSCH, Manufacturers of Gold-headed Canes, Umbrella Mountings, and Novelties in Gold and Silver; Works, Nos. 2 to 12 Melrose Street; Office, No. 376 Potters Avenue ; New York Office, No. 415 Broadway.–The review of the leading manufacturing interests of Providence includes the house of Messrs. Hearn & Braitsch, who are the largest and leading manufacturers in the United States, in the lines of gold-headed canes, umbrella mountings, and novelties in gold and silver, and whose main office is located at No. 376 Potters Avenue, with works at Nos. 2 to 12 Melrose Street. This firm established their business here in 1887, and have built up a prestige and a patronage unequalled by any of their contemporaries in the country. The works comprise a three-story structure, measuring 40 x 175 feet, and supplied with machinery made especially for this purpose, operated by a Corliss steam-engine of 60 horse-power, and steady employment is given to a force of 135 skilled hands. There are twelve different departments represented here, from designing to finishing, all ably manned, and under expert supervision. The firm receive the gold and silver in bullion or bulk, and fashion it into any form desired for adorning canes, umbrellas, and various other purposes. Their latest designs and novelties embody every modern improvement and device, including the important features of strength and lightness in canes and umbrellas, while the products are made of the best materials, with special reference to durability, and are furnished to the trade throughout all parts of the United States, in quantities to suit, at short notice, and at terms and prices which cannot be afforded by rival concerns. A corps of talented salesmen represent the interests of the house upon the road, and a branch salesroom is operated at No. 415 Broadway, N. Y. The co-partners, Messrs. John Hearn and William J. Braitsch. are natives of New York, expert and practical manufacturers of fifteen years' experience, and young men of tried ability, eminent popularity, and sterling worth.

Source: Industries and Wealth of the Principal Points in Rhode Island - 1892


William J. Braitsch later formed the silversmithing business of W. J. Braitsch & Co. at Providence.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 13, 2015 7:48 am

UMBRELLA COVERING

By MARGARET H. IRWIN

IN making a comparative estimate of the earnings in Women's Home Trades' Umbrella Covering may rank, perhaps, as one of the best paid of these.

Its special significance for the student of economic questions lies in the fact that it stands out pre-eminently as a season trade, and the season trade forms probably the chief factor in the problem of unemployment. It is certainly one of the main sources of suffering among the industrial classes, and the unequal strain of work has a generally demoralizing effect on those engaged in such trades.

The description given by a woman worker of the tailoring trade might be applied with equal truth to the outside branches of umbrella covering, "It's slavery for one half of the year, and starvation for the other half."

The manufacture of umbrellas may be divided roughly into two large sections–the home and the export trade. The former includes the silk and the finer kinds of umbrellas. This engages the most skilled hands and is practically confined to the workshop employees. In this branch a good workshop hand may sometimes make as much as 18s. a week. Finishing in the home section of the trade is rarely given out, when it is, it is paid at the rate of 1/7 and 1/8 per dozen.

The export trade, which is the section employing the outworkers, consists mainly in the making of black and coloured calico umbrellas for India and other foreign countries.

The "covering" department of the trade, which in Scotland is taken up exclusively by women, men being employed for making the sticks and frames and cutting out the covers, is divided into two branches, "machining" and "finishing." The machining consists in hemming and seaming the covers, and is done almost entirely in the workshops.

The finishing is done both in the workshops and the homes of the workers. It consists in tacking the covers on the frames and putting on various little fixtures.

Finishing for the export trade requires much less skill, and is paid at much lower rates than in the home branch. But even in the inferior section of it umbrella covering cannot be held to be an unskilled trade as it takes a girl several months to acquire proficiency in it.

During the busy season a fairly skilled outside finisher may make from 11/- to 14/- a week, or even more. During the slack season her earnings may sink to 2s. a week; and this slack season extends from four to six months of the year.

The staple article employing the outside finisher is the "black waterproof." This is paid at the rate of 9d. per dozen. Each dozen takes about three hours to finish, so that the remuneration works out at about 3d. per hour, as against the Id. and 1¾d. per hour earned in the other home needlework trades.

One worker who had been engaged on this work for ten years said she "thought good money could be made at it while the work lasted, but the idle set is hard on us women." She was the wife of a labourer, irregularly employed, and had had five children, of whom only one survived. During the busy season she could make 11 /- a week, and in the slack from 5/- to 6/-.

Another worker, the wife of a tailor, and the mother of three children, said she could make from 10/- to 12/- a week in the busy season, by working hard, " but it's very laborious work and unless you're able to sit at it late and early, you can't make a good pay." Her thread cost from 9d. to 1/- on every 12/- worth of work. During the slack season her earnings sank to 2/3 per week.

The wife of a slater, who had three children, complained that the "wages were greatly broken owing to so many new patent appliances coming in and taking away the work from the women." She was always slack for six months in the year. During this time she could only count on three days work in the week. She worked very late in the busy season during which her maximum wage was 10/- a week.

The great strain of irregular work is much complained of by all the workers in this trade. While the busy season lasts women toil from early morning on through half the night to make a little money while they can. Considerable labour and fatigue are involved also in carrying the heavy loads of umbrella frames and sticks to and from the warehouse. During the busy season numbers of women may be seen with huge bundles of these, either slung on their backs, tied up in old bed covers, or piled on old perambulators.

The trade seems also to lend itself to the competition of married women and other partially supported women, who take it up as a casual employment and earn a supplementary wage by it. The presence of this class of worker in a large proportion in any trade has, as a rule, a tendency to reduce wages, as such women can afford to take the work at lower rates than those who are entirely dependent on it for a livelihood.


Source: Handbook of the "Daily News" Sweated Industries Exhibition May, 1906

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 15, 2015 6:24 am

London

The revival of the animal-headed umbrella handle has given the manufacturing jeweler a chance to adopt some quaint and novel designs. The umbrella handle in vogue this Winter is tall, and rather partial to jazz coloring. Ivory and tortoise shell are popular mediums, while silver, gold and jeweled ornamentation are in order. The animal-head handles are either of wood or composition and appropriately decorated by the silversmith. There is a handle now on the streets shaped on the order of a chameleon with emeralds as eyes; there is a handle shaped like a telescope and finely carved and jeweled; there is also a handle shaped like the artistic butt of an Arab rifle and as profusely decorated with gems. Then there are Egyptian head handles, Siamese twins handles, handles depicting storks, swans'
necks and frogs' heads.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th November 1921

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 22, 2015 7:05 am

C. PILSON

1, Corn Exchange, Cambridge


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C. Pilson - Cambridge - 1881

Established in 1828.

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