Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

For information you'd like to share - Post it here - not for questions
dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri Dec 06, 2013 2:00 pm

S. FRIED jun.

Augustinerstrasse, Burgerspital, Wien


Image
S. Fried jun. - Wien - 1873

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 19, 2013 4:50 pm

THE NATIONAL UMBRELLA Co.

Cleveland, Ohio


Image
The National Umbrella Co. - Cleveland, Ohio - 1902

The business of Arthur M. Graver (b.1868-d.1951)

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sun Jan 05, 2014 8:15 am

FRANZ HIESS, later Franz Hiess & Söhne

Kärntnerstrasse 7, later, 25, Wien


Image
Franz Hiess - Wien - 1866

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 07, 2014 1:09 pm

JAMES WALSH

19, Lower Sackville Street, Dublin

Successor to Cahill & Walsh, Dame Street, Dublin

James Walsh appears to be only a importer and retailer, but items may possibly be marked with name.

The Sylphide umbrella was a product of Sangster’s (see above post)


Image
James Walsh - Dublin - c.1845


Image
James Walsh - Dublin - c.1845

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 15, 2014 2:53 pm

JOHN McALLISTER

Philadelphia

John McAllister, Jr., died December 17th, 1877, aged ninety-one years. He was born at the north-east corner of Market and Second streets, June 29th, 1786. His father, John McAllister, a native of Scotland, was born in Glasgow February, 1753. He came to this country when twenty-two years of age, settling in New York. He came to Philadelphia in 1785, and went into business as a turner and manufacturer of whips and canes, on Market street between Front and Second. In 1798 he formed a partnership with James Matthews of Baltimore, and opened business at No. 50 Chestnut street–afterward No. 48–on the south side, west of Second street. McAllister & Matthews proposed to carry on the whip and cane business, and added to their stock spectacles, glasses, and optical articles. This latter business was found to be more important than the manufacture of whips and canes, which was abandoned; and the attention of Mr. McAllister and his family has since been turned to the manufacture of mathematical and optical instruments. John McAllister, Jr., intended for the business of a merchant, in 1804 entered the counting-house of Montgomery & Newbold, on Water street, having graduated from the University in the preceding year. In 1811 he entered into partnership with his father, Mr. Matthews having retired. The partnership of John McAllister & Son continued until the death of John McAllister, Sr., May 12th, 1830. John McAllister, Jr., with Walter B. Dick, continued the business under the firm of John McAllister, Jr., & Co. In 1835 he retired from the business, which was then conducted by some of the members of the firm and William Y. McAllister, under the firm name of McAllister & Co., and its location was changed to Chestnut street below Eighth, where it still remains. John McAllister, Jr., after 1835, being a gentleman of culture and taste, with a strong liking for local antiquities, devoted himself to the collection of a library rich in works of all kinds, but particularly noticeable for old newspapers, magazines, pamphlets, essays, etc. connected with the history of Philadelphia. He was the oldest alumnus of the University of Pennsylvania, and the oldest member of the Philadelphia Library Company, of the Athenseum, and of the St. Andrew's Society.

Source: Annals of Philadelphia and Pennsylvania in the Olden Time: Being a Collection of Memoirs, Anecdotes, and Incidents of the City and Its Inhabitants, and of the Earliest Settlements of the Inland Part of Pennsylvania - Volume 3 - John Fanning Watson - 1899

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sat Jan 18, 2014 9:40 am

SAMUEL M. DAVID

8, Dock Square, Boston


Image
Samuel M. David - Boston - 1870

Successor to Melendy & David.

DEATH BY ACCIDENT OF JOHN O. DAVID - The community was shocked on Friday last to learn that Mr. John Oliver David, a highly respected and well-known citizen of this place, had been run over by an express team in Boston, fracturing his skull and the bones of his ankle. He was taken to the City Hospital, where he died at about 12 o'clock Saturday night, not regaining his consciousness. Mr. David was born at High Street, Boston, 1813, and was the son of John David, who first began the manufactory of whips at No. 8 Dock Square. The firm was known until recently as Melendy & David. He came to Amherst when he was 6 years old, and was brought up on a farm, until at the age of 12, he went to the deaf and dumb asylum at Hartford, Conn., and was one of the first pupils under Mr. Thomas H. Gallaudet, who introduced the sign language into this country. He was a smart scholar and a favorite of Mr. Gallaudet. After he graduated with honor he was appointed a professor for 8 years. At the end of that time he married Philenia Emerson of Croyden, N.H., and settled here, where his mother resided, after the death of his father. Mr. David has been prominent in the affairs of the deaf mutes, both in Boston and elsewhere. He was an excellent Christian man, took much interest in the religious welfare of the deaf mutes and preached very frequently to them in Boston. He was also agent for many years for the Boston Deaf Mute Society. His death will be a great loss to the deaf mutes. He leaves a son and daughter, John G. David of Boston, and Mrs. W.B. Clark of Minneapolis, Minn. Brief funeral services were holden at Boston on Monday, attended by over 75 deaf mutes, and on Tuesday afternoon services were holden here at the residence of the late Dea. B.B. David, conducted by Rev. Mr. Davis and Rev. Mr. McGown, of a most appropriate and tender character. There were present from abroad, beside immediate relatives, Geo. H. Holmes, Esq., of Boston, a deaf mute, in Register of Deeds' office, Suffolk county, and Mr. V.B. Wright of Nashua. Among the beautiful floral tributes was a wreath from Mrs. Chas. Stratton, and an anchor from the Boston Deaf Mute Society, and a pillow from the children. Interment in the family lot here, where rest a beloved wife and two daughters.

Source: The Farmers' Cabinet - 4th March 1887


OBITUARY - Mrs. Elizabeth Welch David, who died early this morning, was born Oct. 10th, 1802, and was the youngest of the ten children of Wm. and Abigail Melendy who removed from Reading, Mass., to settle in Amherst, NH, about the middle of the last century. She married Barnabas B. David of the firm of Melendy & David, whip manufacturers, Boston, whose sales room in Dock Square was the centre of an extensive trade for over 50 years. Mr. David and wife came to reside in Amherst in 1830, and soon after he bought the house built by Robert Means, Esq., which they occupied together 57 years. Mr. David was an officer of the Congregational church, a prominent and highly respected citizen. Seven children were the fruits of this union, of whom three are living, Edward C. David of Cheyenne, Wy., whose daughter is the wife of Senator Cary; Mrs. E.W. Nichols, widow of the late Geo. W. Nichols of Boston; and Col. James B. David of Somerville, Mass. Of the deceased sons, Dr. Wm. David of Lyons, NY, left a widow and three sons and Samuel M. David of Cambridge left a wife, one daughter and two sons. Mrs. David was a woman of remarkable energy and industry, a pleasing address, cordial and affectionate manner, a devoted wife and mother. She maintained a frequent and full correspondence with her children and grandchildren, who were widely dispersed, until the last months of her life. As will be inferred, she retained her faculties in vigorous and intelligent activity to the end. Her sympathies embraced a wide range of charitable enterprises, her hospitality was unstinted, and her thoughtful attentions to the sick and afflicted insure a grateful remembrance in this whole community. She passed away peacefully in hope of immortal life.

Source: The Farmers' Cabinet - 11th August 1892


Melendy & David were located at 194, Pearl Street, New York in 1840:


Image
Melendy & David - New York - 1840

Trev

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 20, 2014 5:22 am

F. DELHOMME

484, Pearl Street, New York


Image
F. Delhomme - New York - 1840

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 20, 2014 3:07 pm

Umbrellas, in my youth, were not ordinary things; few but the macaronis of the day, as the dandies were then called, would venture to display them. For a long while it was not usual for men to carry them without incurring the brand of effeminacy; and they were vulgarly considered as the characteristics of a person whom the mob then hugely disliked, namely, a mincing Frenchman. At first, a single umbrella seems to have been kept at a coffee-house for some extraordinary occasion–lent as a coach or chair in a heavy shower–but not commonly carried by the walkers. The " Female Tatler" advertises, "the young gentleman belonging to the custom-house, who, in fear of rain, borrowed the umbrella from Wilks' Coffee-house, shall the next time he welcome to the maid's pattern." An umbrella carried by a man was obviously then considered as extreme effeminacy. As late as in 1778, one John Macdonald, a footman, who has written his own life, informs us, that when he carried " a fine silk umbrella, which he had brought from 'Spain, he could not with any comfort to himself use it; the people calling out 'Frenchman ! why don't you get a coach' "The fact was, that the hackney-coachmen and the chairmen, joining with the true esprit de corps, were clamorous against this portentous rival. This footman, in 1775, gives us further information :–" At this time there were no umbrellas worn in London, except in noblemen's and gentlemen's houses, where there was a large one hung in the hall to hold over a lady or a gentleman, if it rained, between the door and their carriage." His sister was compelled to quit his arm one day, from the abuse he drew down on himself by his umbrella. But he adds, that "he persisted for three months, till they took no further notice of this novelty. Foreigners began to use their's, and then the English. Now it is become a great trade in London." The state of our population might now, is some degree, be ascertained by the number of umbrellas.

Source: Miscellanies of Literature - Isaac Disraeli - 1840

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 23, 2014 1:47 pm

C. PRICE

221, Strand, London


Image
C. Price - London - 1814


Image
C. Price - London - 1815

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 27, 2014 4:35 pm

W. & G. ASHFORD & WINDER

Birmingham


Image
W. & G. Ashford & Winder - Birmingham - 1880

Successors to W. & G. Ashford (see above post).

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 31, 2014 11:33 am

CHARLES GREATREX & SON

Walsall, England; Hanover, Germany; and Wellington, New Zealand


Image
Charles Greatrex & Son - Walsall - 1880

Established in 1755. The business of Charles Greatrex & Son was wound up in 1906, but was continued in South Africa as Greatrex Ltd under the control of Bernard Greatrex. The business of G. Greatrex and Son, 9, Leicester Street, Walsall appear to be the successors to Charles Greatrex & Son.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 07, 2014 2:38 pm

JOHN GOODMAN

373, later 334, Ontario Street, Cleveland, Ohio

John Goodman, Manufacturer of Umbrellas and Parasols, also Walking Canes, No. 364 Ontario Street.–Mr. John Goodman, the well-known manufacturer of umbrellas and parasols, began business at No. 373 Ontario street twenty years ago. He removed to his present commodious establishment, at No. 334, on the same street two years ago, and his business has developed to large proportions. His salesroom, which is 20x40 feet in dimensions, is very neatly fitted up and well stocked. He manufactures the finest quality of silk umbrellas, parasols, and walking canes. He employs a number of skilled workmen, has a widespread trade, and his goods have an established reputation for superiority of workmanship and material. Repairing and recovering of umbrellas and parasols are neatly done to order. Mr. Goodman was born in Hungary, and came to Cleveland twenty years ago; he is forty-two years of age and a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the Foresters' society.

Source: Leading Manufacturers and Merchants of the City of Cleveland and Environs - 1886

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 08, 2014 8:12 am

JOHN S. CAULKINS

2, Astor House, New York


Image
John S. Caulkins - New York - 1842

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 09, 2014 7:58 am

R. STANFORD

6, Pittville Street, Cheltenham


Image
R. Stanford - Cheltenham - 1857

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 10, 2014 10:46 am

M.A. GRISWOULD

411, Eleventh Street, N.W. Washington DC


Image
M.A. Griswould - Washington DC - 1905

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 11, 2014 6:02 am

JOSEPH FUSSELL & SON

2 & 4, North Fourth Street, Philadelphia


Image
Joseph Fussell & Son - Philadelphia - 1877

Established in 1836. The business was continued by the son, William Lewis Fussell.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 12, 2014 8:30 am

BYRD & HALL

12-14, Warren Street, New York


Image
Byrd & Hall - New York - 1865


Image
Byrd & Hall - New York - 1867

The business of George J. Byrd and Alvah Hall.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 13, 2014 7:04 am

W. MENDELSON

549, East 43rd Street, New York


Image
W. Mendelson - New York - 1915

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 14, 2014 7:28 am

NATHANIEL ELLIS

77, Court Street, Boston


Image
Nathaniel Ellis - Boston - 1853

Formerly Binney & Ellis.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 34597
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 15, 2014 12:07 pm

PETER SCHNEIDER

21, Maiden Lane, New York


Image
Peter Schneider - New York - 1851

Noted as an exhibitor at the New York Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations in 1853. The address noted in 1853 was 20, Maiden Lane, New York.

Trev.


Return to “Contributors' Notes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests