Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

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dognose
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Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 30, 2012 2:50 pm

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Reading the marks on the silver bands that are applied to walking sticks, canes, parasols, umbrellas, etc. can be a frustrating task. Due to the nature of their application, the marks struck onto the malleable silver bands affixed over hard wooden stems of such items often smooth out and become barely readable, so I thought it may be worthwhile starting a topic relating to manufacturers of these pieces in the hope of identifying some possible likely candidates for the makers.

The topic will, of course, be a work in progress, but hopefully in time turn into a useful resource.

Trev.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 30, 2012 3:11 pm

THOMAS BRIGG & SONS

23, St. James's Street, London SW

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T. Brigg & Sons - London - 1893

Thomas Brigg & Sons are believed to have been established in 1836.


This is the mark of the umbrella, walking stick, and whip manufacturer, Thomas Brigg & Sons of St James's Street, London:

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A brigg in full sail between the letters 'B' and 'S'.

The mark is most often to be found struck in conjunction with the mark of the silversmith Charles Cooke who was the chief mounter of gold and silver ornaments to Thomas Brigg & Sons.

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1906

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1914

Charles Cooke, who until 1888, was in business with his brother, John Robert Cooke, is noted as being located at 17, Frith Street in 1888, 56, Frith Street and 17, Bateman Street, Soho, in 1889, and moved again later that year to 49, Rupert Street, Soho. In 1900 he was listed as being at 1a, Dyott Street, WC, and removed yet again c.1907 to 4, Rigmount Street, Bedford Square.

In 1893, Thomas Brigg and Sons received its first Royal Appointment from Her Majesty Queen Victoria and became the first umbrella maker ever to be honoured with an appointment. Further Royal Appointments were also bestowed by His Majesty King Edward VII.

Up until WWII, Thomas Brigg & Sons maintained a branch establishment in Paris.

Thomas Brigg & Sons merged in 1943 with Swaine & Adeney, and were afterwards styled 'Swaine, Adeney, Brigg & Sons'. They are still in business today and hold the Royal Warrant as "Suppliers of Umbrellas" to HRH The Prince of Wales.


It is curious that an umbrella can be at once such an every-day, humdrum affair, and, under the auspices of Messrs. Brigg, the leading umbrella and stick exponents in the Universe, a thing, not only of beauty, but a joy so rich and rare as to last for all time. Specialising exclusively in sticks, umbrellas, and whips, Messrs. Brigg have made their name famous the world over, but, to appreciate adequately the extraordinary possibilities that prevail in this apparently restricted area, one must pay a personal visit to St. James's Street, or, if perchance your domicile be Paris, to 33, Avenue de l'Opera, where a story such as one scarcely dreams of, in the highest flights of fancy is unfolded.
As design after design of umbrella handles of richest workmanship, frequently enhanced by jewels, is opened up for inspection, one seems to touch the ne plus ultra in this regard. A fancy of exquisite genre is a delicately shaped mount of dark green jade, on which is worked in relief a tiny leaf design in green gold on a groundwork of red gold, picked out with ruby and diamonds. This, disposed in a case with the customary gold spokes, has the luxurious gift-note writ large all over it. Another unique example is a trumpet shape in dull 18-carat gold, the top inset with one huge pearl blister, outlined by a crescent disposal of olivines. Less extravagantly rich, but exceedingly chaste and beautiful, is the photographed handle, formed of a long stem of tortoise-shell enriched with frosted gold, outlined by minute bands of white enamel, a diamond scroll design with ruby points effecting an artistic finish. The practical feature of this is, that it is made to unscrew, so that the remaining portion of a full-sized umbrella or parasol can be easily packed away in an ordinary trunk. This procedure of screwing, however, is an old story with Brigg, who has, within comparatively recent days, improved on the process, sunshade handles being now made adjustable to the very tip of the spokes.
Living, as is their way, with both ears to the ground, this firm have been the first to catch the revived fancy for carrying evening canes. It is a quaint, picturesque conceit enough, and the lords of the creation may be heartily congratulated on their discrimination in again falling under its influence. Malacca is chiefly responsible for these evening canes, and Messrs. Brigg are bringing all the battery of their fine artistic taste to bear on a decoration that is at once tasteful and unaggressive. A feature, that may also be introduced, if desired, to intensify the old-world appearance, is the silk cord and tassels, the former threaded through gold eyelet-holes. But the best idea, perhaps,will be gained by a glance at the adjoined illustration of an almost white Malacca cane with top of delicate chased gold. As a Yuletide gift for difficult man, let me commend these evening canes with all emphasis, and thereby uphold the protest, elurchez la femme, where a small extravagance is concerned.

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For the remaining item of the pictured trio, there is offered the season's fad in hunting-crops, a short, thick concern, entirely covered in pigskin, completed by the usual thong. There is a very rage for these, and Messrs. Brigg, with keen perceptions well on the alert, provided early for the onslaught that has most indubitably arrived. Though, when it comes to talking about the utilitarian virtues of pigskin as applied to slicks, crops, and umbrella handles, I am reminded that time and space are alike failing me, so away with temptations and to the fore with an earnest assurance that all in quest of the supreme in all that pertains to the above will find the highest expectations realised at 23, St. James's Street.


Source: The Bystander - 1906



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To those in search of something quite out of the common as regards Christmas gifts, we would recommend a visit to Messrs. Brigg, the well-known umbrella and stick manufacturers of St. James's Street, where they have been established since 1836. Here may be found the most entrancing collection of stick and umbrella handles in tortoise-shell and amber, decorated with exquisitely delicate incrustations in different coloured golds and enamels, enhanced by tiny brilliants. Each handle is a lovely work of art, and a more fascinating Christmas gift could not be imagined. More practical, if less daintily ornamental, are the hunting crops for men and women, the former in whalebone covered with leather, the latter covered with the popular pigskin, which colours beautifully, like a meerschaum, the more it is used. Messrs. Brigg use the pigskin for the handles of umbrellas and en-tout-cas, and it is well to note that the prices of their famous umbrellas begin as low as a guinea. The firm justly pride themselves on the fact that everything use is made by their own workmen. Whether it is the delicate jewellery work of their tortoiseshell and amber handles, or the weaving of the special silk they use for their umbrellas and en-tout-cas, everything is made by the firm's highly trained workpeople. This insures the wonderful finish in every detail that characterises Messrs. Brigg's goods, and has made their reputation not only at their Paris house, but at Biarritz, Brussels, Madrid. Naples, Rome and Vienna, in all of which towns they have agents.

Source: Country Life - Volume 22 - 1907


A 1921 advertisement for Brigg & Son's American agent, MM Importing Co., 6, East 45th Street, New York:

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MM Importing Co. - New York - 1921


Brigg and Son, 23, St. James's Street, S.W.

This establishment always appeals to me as an abiding place of opportunity and resource, though concentrated on the supply of sticks, umbrellas, and whips. Tortoiseshell is the craze of the hour, so observe the centre example of the three umbrella handles depicted. This, a ball of clouded tortoiseshell, is mounted on an 18-carat gold collar, and enriched by a diamond scroll, set with rubies.

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A considerable share of fastidious choice continues to fall upon New Zealand jade as a decorative detail for umbrella handles. And apropos of green, perhaps the really great novelty this year is the green-dyed hog-skin umbrella handle, encircled with a jade ring with gilt setting and mounted with green silk. Few will question the exceeding fascination of this ensemble, both in umbrella and en tout cas form, the dyeing and polishing processes being executed with such consummate skill as to procure what may faithfully be described as an absolutely fresh effect. The word has, furthermore, gone forth that umbrellas and en tout cas are both to be still larger next year, all the fresh models at 23, St. James's Street tending in this direction, while many of the silks used for covering show a woven braid border.
Beautiful beyond compare is the enamel executed by Brigg, more and more attention being accorded this art every year, under the auspices of trained experts. Of the two oval-shaped tops included in the group, the one is of a delicate grass-green enamel, enclosed within a collar of white and Royal blue enamel, the former treated as to effect the appearance of small pearls, a scheme of contrast that is repeated at the top in the semblance of a ribbon' rosette. For the other a rich violet enamel is selected, the top ornamented with a delicate applique work in shaded golds, representing a design of the rose, shamrock, and thistle, a chaste gold collar finishing the neck.

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An exceptionally interesting piece is the walking-stick illustrated, of light-coloured rhinoceros horn, with a large crook handle, merely relieved by a plain gold collar. There are probably not more than half a dozen of such specimens in existence. Admirable taste again is displayed in the walking-stick of Coromandel wood, surmounted by a top of clouded tortoiseshell, and encircled by a trellis collar of gold, through the interstices of which one gets glints of the shell.
At the same time, it may be apropos to bring forward the reminder that Messrs. Brigg, while revelling in the production of these exquisite extravagances, are yet amply supplied with fancies at reasonable rates, suitable for Christmas gifts, the above-mentioned green umbrella with dyed hog-skin handle to whit.


Source: The Bystander - 1908


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Brigg and Son - London-1908


Trev.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Mon Oct 01, 2012 5:33 am

KENDALL & SONS

Post Office Place, Granby Street, Leicester

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The business of Kendall and Sons was founded by William Wheeler Kendall in 1870, and by the 1960's had over a hundred retail stores bearing their name.

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Kendall & Sons Ipswich branch

The partners at Kendall & Sons in 1913 were noted as Percy W. Kendall, Frank R. Kendall, and E. Clifford Kendall. Frank Kendall's private residence was noted in 1913 as Moel Leys, Kirby Muxloe, Leicestershire.

The company remained a family business until 1977 when it was acquired by Combined English Stores. In 1981 it was sold to Hepworth and Sons, of Leeds, who are now better known as the retail chain 'Next'.

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Kendall & Sons - London - 1922

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Kendall & Sons - London - 1940

Kendall & Sons entered their first mark at the London Assay Office on the 29th January 1913, 'K & S' above 'Ltd.' contained in a flat top shield with a pointed base, this mark was in use until June 1921. A second mark (shown above) was entered c.1921, an incuse 'K & S Ld' contained within an oblong punch.

Trev.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby MCB » Mon Oct 01, 2012 5:43 am

Charles Cooke

Charles Arthur Cooke was born in 1860, the son of Joseph Cooke, a tailor from Mimm Street, Marylebone and his wife Ann.
He entered marks at Goldsmiths Hall in 1888, 1898 and 1912 all comprising CC in a rectangle with a pellet between the initials. The wear to the mark in the above image appears to have erased the pellet.
He died in Leigh on Sea, Essex in 1914.

Mike

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 02, 2012 5:45 pm

FRANCIS SMYTH

75, Grafton Street, and, 22, later, 24, Essex Quay, and 4, Lower Sackville Street, Dublin

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Francis Smyth - Dublin - 1852

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Francis Smyth & Son - Dublin - 1878

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Francis Smyth & Son - Dublin - 1880

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Francis Smyth & Son - Dublin - 1883

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Francis Smyth & Son - Dublin - 1902

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Francis Smyth & Son - Dublin - 1902

In the above advertisements it is clearly stated the products of Francis Smyth & Son were available with gold or silver mounts. In Ireland there are no minimum weight exemptions, so therefore these mounts should have been hallmarked, presumably by the Dublin Assay Office.

Francis Smyth established his business in 1836.


AN IRISH UMBRELLA MAKING FIRM

It is easy to estimate that a large sum of money leaks out of Ireland through the purchase of imported umbrellas. Our uncertain climate suggests a big market for such articles of which market British manufacturers take the lion’s share. Ireland, however, has umbrella manufacturers whose hold on the home market is increasing. Much of the raw material, so to speak, used by the latter has of necessity to be brought into the country, but its manufacture into the finished product represents an Irish industry which is worthy of wholehearted support. The writer has received a wholesale catalogue of one of these firms, Messrs. Francis Smyth and Son, whose workshops are situated in their premises, 75 Grafton Street, Dublin. It is a neatly got up publication, and comprises a long list of the articles made by the firm as well as various items such as walking-sticks, Irish blackthorns etc., in which they also deal. The cover contains imprints of medals awarded for excellence of merit at different Irish Exhibitions since 1850 and several footnotes emphasise that the umbrellas sold by the firm are guaranteed to be of their own manufacture. At present the firm do a wholesale and retail business, having branches in Dublin besides the Grafton Street house. The wholesale department is a comparatively recent addition. Many years ago they carried on a large wholesale business, but lack of support induced them to discontinue it and concentrate their attention on the retail trade. But in the Irish Industrial Revival, the proprietors saw an opportunity which they determined not to ignore, and, accordingly, in 1902, they re-opened in the wholesale line with successful results. We know that a great obstacle, happily diminishing of recent years, in the way of the Industrial Movement has been an unreasonable prejudice against home manufacture. An unfair but too prevalent notion that their claims to preference rested more on patriotic than economic considerations. If the advocacy of the “as good and as cheap” theory as the safest general principle to be adopted in regard to supporting Irish-made goods had no other recommendation than its efficacy as an argument to destroy this prejudice, it would still have much justification. With regard to these Irish-made umbrellas, it is claimed that in asking a preference for them as Irish manufacture, Messrs. Smyth and Son only do so on the basis that they are at least equal in price and quality to those imported. The makers lay stress on this feature, as they have found prevailing in some quarters an unjust and injurious impression that they are an expensive house. On the contrary, they maintain that they readily keep abreast of the cheapening tendency of the times, and that their manufacture can be bought at prices suitable to every pocket. As an example, they point out that they make both ladies and gentlemen’s umbrellas as cheap as 2s. 6d. each. They also make a speciality of ladies fancy umbrellas at the low price of 4s. 6d., whilst their Irish-made sunshades can be had from 2s. 6d. upwards. A half-crown for what a firm of repute affirms is a good reliable article seems to go down to the bedrock of economy, and between these low-priced ones and the dearer kinds which range to about 30s. for sunshades and 70s. for umbrellas, the purchaser of an Irish-made umbrella. or parasol is afforded a great variety of choice.

Source: The Leader - 1st April 1905


Trev.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Wed Oct 03, 2012 1:39 pm

BENJAMIN ELLAM

213, Piccadilly, London

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B. Ellam - London - 1855

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B. Ellam - London - 1855

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B. Ellam - London - 1861

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B. Ellam - London - 1865

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Benjamin Ellam - London - 1886

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri Oct 05, 2012 6:57 am

BEN COX & SONS

411, Oxford Street, London W

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Ben Cox - London - 1897

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Ben Cox - London - 1903

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Ben Cox - London - 1905

The business of Benjamin Brinley Cox was established in 1878 at 7, North Audley Street. The relocated to 411, Oxford Street in 1887. They were also recorded as having premises at 179, Aldersgate Street EC, and 22, Moorfields EC. By 1913 the firm was styled Ben Cox & Sons, and had the additional address of 75a, Victoria Street, Westminster SW.

They registered just the one mark at the London Assay Office, 'BBC' (Benjamin Brinley Cox) in an oblong punch with clipped corners, on the 12th November 1888.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sun Oct 07, 2012 10:06 am

WILLIAM BURLEY

6, Old Charles Street, City Road, later, 6, Moreland Street, City Road, and later still, 12, Upper Ashby Street, Goswell Road, Clerkenwell, London

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Marks noted on a sword stick, assayed at London 1917, also bearing the name of 'COX' (see above post), contained within an oblong punch.

William Burley was recorded as a Stick Mounter in 1903, and a Whip Mounter in 1916.

William Burley entered four marks with the London Assay Office, all being 'W.B' contained within a flattened oval. They were entered on the 30th July 1885, 31st October 1888, 12th June 1894, and 4th September 1903.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 09, 2012 5:11 am

JAMES SCHOMBERG & SONS

122, Long Acre, and later, 10 Long Acre, London

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James Schomberg & Sons - London - 1908 (marked noted on a riding crop)

This business was founded by James Schomberg. By 1897, it was styled as James Schomberg & Sons, and subsequently carried on by Arthur Schomberg and Henry Schomberg.


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Source: Kelly's Directory of the Leather Trades - 1885

I do not think I need say anything more about whips or horns except to mention that Messrs. Callow & Son, of 8, Park Lane, Piccadilly, and Messrs. Swaine & Adeney, of 185, Piccadilly, are, so far as my knowledge goes, the best whip-makers, although there are, no doubt, others who do their work in a first-rate manner. I have bought whips of James Schomberg, 122, Long Acre, who makes whips his speciality, and who has given me perfect satisfaction.

Source: Highways and Horses - Athol Maudslay - 1888

James Schomberg entered his mark at the London Assay Office, 'J.S' in an oval, on the 4th September 1896. James Schomberg & Sons enter their mark, 'J.S&S' (as shown above), on the 26th January 1905.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri Oct 12, 2012 5:21 am

R. LANDSTONE & Co.

73 & 75, Goswell Street, London EC

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This business was founded by Adolph Landstone (the name perhaps anglicized from Landstein) by 1897. He was recorded as a stick maker located at 8 & 10, Golden Lane, Barbican, London EC at that date. The business was continued by Rosalie Landstone and styled R. Landstone & Co., recorded at 108 Aldersgate Street, London EC, and later at 17, Goswell Road, Clerkenwell, London EC. Their last recorded address was 73 & 75, Goswell Road in 1913.

Adolph Landstone entered his marks at the London Assay Office, on the 14th February 1899 'A.L', and on the 28th March 1899 'AL', both in oblong punches with clipped corners. R. Landstone & Co. entered their marks on the 26th April 1904, and 3rd October 1906, both 'RL&Co' contained within two conjoined circles (as shown above).

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sat Oct 13, 2012 10:44 am

EBENEZER NEWMAN & Co.

1 & 2, Leonard Street, City Road, London EC


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E. Newman & Co. - London - 1895


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1920

Ebenezer Newman & Co. was first recorded at 32, Great Bath Street, Farringdon Road, and 72, Rosoman Street, Clerkenwell in 1883. By 1886 they were located at 2, King Square, Goswell Road, Clerkenwell, before removing to the Leonard Street address by 1899.



772,2 89. MEASURING-STICK. Ebenezer Newman, London, England. Filed Oct. 9,1903. Serial No. 176,443. (No model.)

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Claim.–1. In a measuring-stick the combination of a hollow stick, a tube free to slide in the stick and bearing a measuring-scale, a gaging-arm adapted to slide into the tube when not in use and to be set at right angles thereto when in operation and means for fixing it rigidly in the latter position when desired, substantially as set forth.
2. In a measuring-stick the combination of a hollow stick, a tube free to slide in the stick and bearing a measuring-scale, a plug sliding in the tube and a gaging-arm hinged to the plug and free to be received by the tube or set at right angles thereto, substantially as set forth.
3. In a measuring-stick the combination of a hollow stick, a tube free to slide in the stick and bearing a measuring-scale, a plug sliding in the said tube, and a gaging-arm connected with the plug by a slot and pin and free to be received by the tube or set at right angles thereto, substantially as set forth.
4. In a measuring-stick the combination of a hollow stick, a tube free to slide in the stick and bearing a measuring-scale, a plug sliding in said tube, and a gaging-arm connected with the plug by a slot and pin, the slot having a cam-face on its lower side to engage the pin and the arm being free to be received by the tube or set at right angles thereto, substantially as set forth.


Source: Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office - Volume 112 - Part 2 - 11th October 1904



Ebenezer Newman & Co. entered a total of eight marks at the London Assay Office, all being 'E.N' in an oblong punch. The dates of entry were 2nd May 1883, 15th December 1886, 11th October 1888, 1st November 1889, 25th September 1890, 6th November 1899 and 10th September 1903.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sun Oct 14, 2012 3:59 pm

HENRY JOHNSTON

31, High Street and 35, Donegall Place, Belfast. 21, Nassau Street, Dublin. 1, New Bridge Street, Newcastle-on-Tyne

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Johnston - Belfast - 1893

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Johnston - Belfast - 1896

The business was converted into a limited liability company, styled as H. Johnston Umbrellas Ltd. in c.1915.

Henry Johnston entered his marks ('H·J' contained within an oblong punch) with the London Assay Office on the 28th October and 21st November 1901.

Trev.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Mon Oct 15, 2012 2:00 pm

JAMES SMITH & SONS

57, & 59, New Oxford Street, London WC

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James Smith & Sons - London - 1896

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James Smith & Sons - London - 1904

Originally established in 1830 by James Smith at Fouberts Place, Regent Street. His son, James Albert Smith, moved the business to New Oxford Street in 1857, and opened a branches at 2, Savile Row, 5, Hemmings Row, 47, Moorgate Street, and The Arcade, Bond Street. A later branch at New Burlington Street was destroyed in an air raid in WWII.

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1902

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'J.A.S' (the 'J' being obscured), London - 1902

James Smith & Sons are still in business today and operating from the same premises, now re-numbered 53, New Oxford Street, an image of which can be found at:
http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:James ... Street.jpg

James Smith & Sons entered marks at the London Assay Office. 'J.S' in an oblong punch from December 1877 until February 1881. 'J.A.S' in an oblong punch from February 1881, and 'JS&Ss' in an oblong punch, as from July 1904.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Wed Oct 17, 2012 4:20 am

JOSEPH MOFFAT

32, Keptie Street, Arbroath

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Joseph Moffat - Arbroath - 1899

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Joseph Moffat - Arbroath - 1901

Joseph Moffat is thought to have been in business until 1941. He died in 1944.

Trev.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby Hose_dk » Fri Oct 19, 2012 11:08 am

here we have a do it yourself umbrella. The set is for sale at the local charity shop. Dont know whether it is silver. Proberly not, I found the price to high when I saw it for the first time 30 weeks ago Its still there so its proberly to expensive.

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The picture I took today with my thelephone and its behind glass

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri Oct 19, 2012 11:53 am

Hi Hose,

Perhaps.....

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J C Vickery - London - 1907

Regards, Trev.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Sun Oct 21, 2012 7:27 am

W. & J. SANGSTER

140, Regent Street, London

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MESSRS. W. & J. SANGSTER,
Parasol and Umbrella manufacturers, 140, Regent Street. There is perhaps no article of fashionable use, of which ladies are more choice in their selection, or which admits of greater variety in the style and quality of the material, than the parasol; originally derived from the East, where it was emblematical of kingly power, on its first introduction, it was only patronized by the higher classes, it is now however of universal use.
Foremost amongst these favourite articles, must be named the Sylphide Parasol, light and graceful as its name implies, it has fully secured the favour of the fair sex, and may now be seen in all the most fashionable drives and promenades in and about London; indeed, such has been the demand for this attractive parasol, that since its introduction, the manufacturers have supplied no less than sixty thousand. The Patentees have just made a very important improvement in this most useful and indispensable appendage to a lady's attire, rendering it still more graceful and convenient.
Messrs. Sangster are also patentees of the much approved Alpaca Umbrella, of which upwards of seventy thousand have been sold.


Source: London as it is To-day - 1851



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W.& J. Sangster - London - 1842

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W.& J. Sangster - London - 1854

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W.& J. Sangster - London - 1855

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W.& J. Sangster - London - 1862

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W.& J. Sangster - London - 1862

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W.& J. Sangster - London - 1864

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W.& J. Sangster - London - 1865

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Sangsters' - London - 1868

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Sangsters' - London - 1874

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Sangsters' - London - 1884

William and John Sangster were awarded a Prize Medal for, "Silk Parasols and Umbrellas of excellent quality, and for their application of alpaca cloth to the coverings of Parasols and Umbrellas" at the Great Exhibition of 1851.

Besides the Regent Street shop, W.& J. Sangster had branches at 94, Fleet Street, 10, Royal Exchange, and a wholesale department at 75, Cheapside.

W.& J. Sangster were established before 1840, further detail can be found in the transcript of an Old Bailey trial held on the 23rd November 1840. See Old Bailey Online t18401123-88


William Sangster wrote 'Umbrellas and their History' in 1855:

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1855

In which he wrote: "Since this time W. & J. S. have sold, under their patent, Umbrellas to the number of nearly four millions.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 23, 2012 2:44 pm

T. CHETLAND & Co.

Birmingham

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Mark noted on a swagger stick assayed at Birmingham in 1916.

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T. Chetland & Co. registered their mark at the Birmingham Assay Office in August 1902.

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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 30, 2012 6:34 pm

BROCKWELL & Co.

15, Featherstone Buildings, London WC

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1883

Formerly the business of William Wheeler & Co. located at 79-80 Leather Lane, Holborn EC, they were succeeded by Frederick Henry Brockwell in 1859, and by 1872 he had moved to 8, Brooke Street, Holborn. Frederick Brockwell appears to have retired or died by 1873 and the firm was continued by Henry Titterton Brockwell.

A partnership between Henry Brockwell and Johm Elwin Evered, trading as Brockwell & Co. was dissolved in 1894. The firm were out of business c.1910, their last recorded address being 15, Featherstone Buildings.

A total of fifteen marks were entered at the London Assay Office by this firm, the first was on the 19th July 1959, 'F.H.B' in an oblong punch. The rest were all 'H.T.B' or 'HTB', the first being entered on the 2nd October 1874, and the last on the 2nd April 1895.

Trev.

dognose
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Re: Sticks, Whips, Canes, Parasols, and Umbrellas

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 02, 2012 7:11 pm

GRIFFITHS & SON

322, Holborn, London

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Griffiths and Son - London - 1839

Trev.


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