Some London Advertisements and Information

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 07, 2014 10:10 am

JENNER & KNEWSTUB

33, St. Jame's Street, and 66 & 69, later, 68, Jermyn Street, London


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Jenner & Knewstub - London - 1863

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Jenner & Knewstub - London - 1868

Established in c.1856 by Frederick Jenner and Fabian James Knewstub. The firm were noted as exhibitors at the International Exhibitions at London in 1862, and Paris in 1878. They were incorporated as a limited liability company in c.1888, and appear to disappear around 1890 following the business being acquired by A. Webster & Co., stationers.

Jenner & Knewstub entered their mark 'F.J' above 'F.K' contained within a square punch, with the London Assay Office on the 8th October 1874, and again, on the 6th February 1877.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 12, 2014 12:25 am

GEORGE ORPWOOD

34, later, 82, Bishopsgate Street Without, London


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G. Orpwood - London - 1839


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George Orpwood - London - 1852


INSOLVENT DEBTORS

PETITIONS TO BE HEARD

At the Court, Portugal-street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, Middlesex

Tuesday, April 6, at 9

Orpwood George Augustus Joseph, (sued by the name of George Orpwood,) formerly of No.1, Dean-street, New North-road, Hoxton, afterwards of No.59, Tabernacle-walk, Finsbury, then of No.12, Upper Clifton-street, Finsbury, and of No.58, Bishopgate-street Within, journeyman watch-maker and watchmaker, and late of No.5, Camomile-street, Bishopsgate Within, clock and watchmaker and jeweller.


Source: The Law Advertiser - 1830


George Orpwood was a member of the Clockmakers Company, being recorded as Free, by redemption in 1829.

The apprentices of George Orpwood can be found at: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=8565&p=104136#p104136

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Sep 13, 2014 7:51 am

WALTER FRANK KNIGHT

Stanley Road, Wellingborough, and Kettering


Jewels For a Cathedral

H.M. The Queen and H.R.H. Prince Philip will be present at St. Paul's Cathedral, London, on May 7 at the dedication of the new High Alter, commemorating those members of the Commonwealth Overseas who gave their lives in the two world wars. The centrepiece of the Alter is a magnificent cross and a pair of candlesticks designed by Mr. S.F. Dykes-Bower and made by Mr. Frank Knight, the Wellingborough silversmith. The cross is bronze, heavily gilt, and is 9ft. high, with a convex panel of lapis lazuli at each corner of the base. The centre of the cross is a star-shaped ornament of eight square-cut amethysts, each weighing about 27 ct. each, and eight smaller triangular amethysts between, surrounding an ice-clear rock crystal of 150 ct. The ornament is duplicated on the East side of the Cross giving a play of light back. Great crystal spheres, each 45 mm. in diameter, are set in the arms and head of the Cross. The jewels were supplied and specially set by Saunders, Shepherd & Co., and were cut by Matthews Lapidaries Ltd.


Source: Watchmaker, Jeweller & Silversmith - May 1958


Birthday Honours Award

Among the thousands of awards announced on June 10, to mark Her Majesty The Queen's official birthday, was the appointment of the Officer of the British Empire of Mr. Walter Frank Knight, ecclesiastical goldsmith. Mr. Knight is in business as a jeweller in Kettering.

Source: Watchmaker, Jeweller & Silversmith - July 1961


Walter Frank Knight entered his mark 'W.F.K' contained within an oblong punch with clipped corners, with the London Assay Office.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Sep 13, 2014 2:04 pm

WOLFSKY & Co.Ltd.

Bridgewater Square, Barbican, London


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Wolfsky & Co.Ltd. - London - 1905


IMPORTANT LONDON COMBINE

Messrs. Wolfsky & Co. Ltd. and John Southgate & Sons arrange to Run in Double Harness

Description and View of their new City Manufactory and Show-rooms

HERE is, perhaps. no branch of the leather industry which has developed more extensively during the latter part of the 19th century than that concerned in the manufacture of travelling requisites, both as regards the number of firms engaged therein, and the increasingly wide range of goods they put on the
market. It is difficult to realise that the ubiquitous Gladstone, the serviceable kit bag, and the indispensable suit case, were all unknown to our forefathers when they set out on their travels. The substantial leather portmanteau, or porte-maninua, to use the original form of the word, can boast of a pedigree dating back to the time of the Stuart, but that must have been a cumbersome article to drag about with one for a flying visit. And yet the only alternative would appear to have been one of those terrible, early Victorian carpet bags, clumsy in workmanship and horribly crude in colouring, belated specimens of which may occasionally be found in the lumber rooms of old houses. Fortunately for us, the carpet bag has vanished into the dim vistas of the past, though its memory yet survives in the opprobrious term of “carpet-bagger” which we still hear applied in political contests to the candidate who, in a sense, is making only a flying visit to the constituency at the bidding of party wire-pullers, in the hope of securing a seat in Parliament.


Times have changed, and we must change also, or be left behind in the race for commercial supremacy; and two of the leading firms of leather goods manufacturers in this country have acted up to their belief in the truth of the ancient adage. Strenuous efforts have been made to organise their business affairs in such a way as to keep in touch with the progressive growth of the popular demand, and to attain this end nowadays, two things above all are absolutely necessary–promptness in the execution of orders, and reliability in the goods supplied. The day of the small manufacturer, employing only a few hands, and with a limited circle of customers, is over; it is the combination of highly-skilled labour and keen intelligence, concentrated in a spacious factory, with every modern facility for turning out the best possible goods at the lowest possible prices, and with an organised staff of travellers and agents soliciting orders throughout the length and breadth of the land, that alone can command success.

Among the large number of houses engaged in this business in London, the names of two rank very high–– the one for fitted goods and high-class bags, and the other for substantially-made travelling requisites of every class–to wit, Messrs. Wolfsky and Co. Limited, of Bridgewater Square, Barbican, London, E.C. (late of Southwark Street, SE), and Messrs. John Southgate & Sons, of Watling Street, E.C. The former business has been established nearly half-a-century, and the latter was founded by the great-grandfather of Mr. Spencer D. Southgate a century and a half ago. As the trade is now aware, these two houses, with a view to further strengthening their position, have amalgamated their forces, at the same time maintaining their separate organisations for securing business and dealing with the execution of orders. The negotiations for this important combine were completed just at the time when Messrs. Wolfsky had made arrangements for transferring the whole of their manufacturing plant and staff from South of the Thames, right into the heart of that district of London which has now become the recognised headquarters of the leather goods industry. Cheapside on the south, Old Street on the north, with Moor-gate Street and Aldersgate Street on the east and west, may roughly be considered the boundaries of that area, and Bridgewater Square, Barbican, the address to which Messrs. Wolfsky have removed, is right in the centre of that neighbourhood.

Bridgewater Square, at the present time a unique example of fur in urbe, has connected with it many historical associations, and to those of an antiquarian turn of mind it will be of interest to learn that “in days gone by Aldersgate Street was the favourite residential neighbourhood of peers and courtiers. Wealthy commoners built their splendid mansions there, whilst the adjoining parish of St. Giles, Cripplegate, had noblemen, baronets, heralds and antiquaries, authors of repute, and fashionable squires and dames among its householders. At the close of the sixteenth century, Sir Thos. Egerton, Lord High Chancellor of England, resided in the Barbican, and when his son was created Earl of Bridgewater, and obtained possession of Garter House, the old residence of Sir Thos. Wriothesley, Garter King of Arms in the reign of Henry the Eighth, the name was changed to Bridgewater House. This was a stately mansion, embosomed in trees and surrounded by gardens, remarkable, as Evelyn notes, for their fertility. The Earls of Bridgewater resided here for more than half-a-century, until the destruction of their house by a great fire in 1687. So we see that, more than 200 years ago, the Barbican had an unenviable reputation for renewing itself, like the phoenix, by periodical confiagrations! Messrs. Wolfsky’s handsome new premises now occupy the site of Bridgewater House, and the square, with its still existing garden of well-kept turf shaded by spreading trees, formed the forecourt of the mansion.

It will be remembered that for many years Messrs. Wolfsky carried on their business at Bridewell Place, near Ludgate Circus, but a fire occurring on their premises just at a busy season of the year, they were compelled to seek fresh quarters without delay, and removed to premises in Southwark Street, on the south side of Blackfriars Bridge. It soon became apparent, however, that although this was only about five minutes’ walk from their former position, it was a step in the wrong direction, and the directors, like sensible men, took the first opportunity of retracing it. As a temporary measure, some eighteen months ago, a showroom in Falcon Square, Aldersgate, was taken on a short lease, but this arrangement was not altogether satisfactory, though it proved conclusively the desirability of a more central site, so Messrs. Wolfsky determined to house the whole of their business under one roof at the very earliest moment. To make such a resolution was easy enough; to find suitable premises on the right spot was quite another matter. The City itself is only a mile Square, and as the aim of every business man is to be as central as possible, it was very difficult to obtain adequate accommodation within such a limited area. But by dint of energy, perseverance, and patience, Messrs. Wolfsky have at last succeeded in attaining their object, and have secured a long lease of a handsome block of recently-erected buildings in Bridgewater Square, Barbican, two minutes' walk from Aldersgate Street Station, which fulfils every requirement.

For the information of those who are unable to pay a personal visit to the new premises, we may mention that all the six floors are connected by a hydraulic lift, which greatly facilitates the conveyance ofgoods from the factory or storerooms to the packing and forwarding department in the basement. The building is lighted throughout with electricity, and the offices are heated by electric radiators. A private telephone connects the offices of the managing director and manager with every department of the business, and an extension line to Watling Street maintains communication with Mr. Spencer Southgate. In fine, no matter has been overlooked which is calculated to assist the smooth and easy running of the business, and no praise is too high to bestow upon the excellent arrangements for the well being of the numerous employees of the company.

Of Messrs. John Southgate & Sons it may be said that they have the distinction of being the oldest firm by far in the London bag trade. They can look back upon a business which has been in existence since 1758, and during the whole of that time in the hands of members of the Southgate family, and under the recent arrangement with Messrs. Wolfsky, the Southgate influence, and that influence is a great one among bag buyers, is still retained in the person of Mr. Spencer D. Southgate, who, since the lamented death of Mr. Wm. Southgate, has presided over the destinies of the business. Another important result of the amalgamation will be to reduce the cost of manufacture by combining the two factory staffs at Bridgewater Square, thus producing all their goods under the one roof, and under one works manager. All orders, whether taken at Bridgewater Square or Watling Street, or by their travellers and agents at home and abroad, will be executed at the new factory, and all the lines of goods catalogued by each firm in the past will be just as readily obtainable as before. Mr. Southgate, and with him his fidur Admin, Mr. John Webster, under the new arrangement, will be relieved of the burden of factory supervision, and will thus be in a position to devote more time to furthering the interests of the combine.

A few words about the personnel of the joint management will not here be out of place.

The managing director, Mr. R. G. FitzGerald Uniacke, of Schopwick Place, Elstree, in addition to being one of the largest shareholders in Wolfsky and Co. Ltd., has been actively engaged in the business since 1888, at first as secretary, then as general manager, and latterly in the more important position he now fills. He may justly be considered a representative of high commerce, one possessed of rare business acumen and keen foresight.

The secretary, Mr. C. de C. Richards, who is also a large shareholder and a director of the company, was for many years a partner in the well-known firm of Messrs. McLeod, of Calcutta, and the wide experience he gained in that capacity is of great assistance in the business, as he is thoroughly acquainted with the requirements of the Indian and Colonial markets.

Mr. H. J. Atkinson, the energetic and capable manager, has been connected with the company for over 20 years, for the greater part of which period he held the position of assistant manager, being promoted to the more responsible post of manager at the beginning of last year. It is needless to say how highly his services are valued by the company.

The factory was running at full pressure in the old premises right up to the Thursday before Easter, and by the end of the following week all the various departments were again hard at work in their new quarters. Anyone who has had to do with the removal of such an extensive business will recognise what this means. If any further instance be required of their alertness and determination to keep well in the van of progress, it is afforded by the successful issue of their negotiations with Messrs. John Southgate and Sons for the amalgamation of their respective interests.

Of Mr. Spencer D. Southgate it should be necessary to say very little. His good-humoured, cheery face is too well known among members of the saddlery trade for any introduction to that gentleman to be at all requisite. Association functions, dinners or picnics.

The excellence of the goods manufactured by both these well-known firms has been attested at more than one International Exhibition, both Messrs. Wolfsky and Co. Ltd. and Messrs. John Southgate and Sons having secured prize medals for goods exhibited by them. At the Amsterdam International Exhibition of 1893 Messrs. Wolfsky 8: Co. Ltd. were awarded a gold medal, while Messrs. Southgate and Sons obtained a like honour at the Great International Exhibition of London in 1862, “for excellence of manufacture and cheapness." By a curious coincidence, at this latter exhibition, where the father of Mr. Spencer Southgate secured the above honour, the grandfather of Mr. Uniacke, the managing director of this combine, held the honourable position of Chief Commissioner of Nova Scotia. His report, written from 11 St. James’ Place, London, in 1862, affords interesting reading, and we may be excused for publishing the following extract:–“ It is with pride as well as gratification that it is my pleasing duty to state, for the information of His Excellency, the Earl of Mulgrave, that we have been awarded nineteen medals and obtained Honourable Mention in eleven other departments. I trust it will be the ardent endeavour of those interested in the promotion of arts, science, literature, and manufactures, earnestly to devote their talents to improve in those varied branches which tend to promote the advancement of our colony and illustrate its great natural resources.” This Mr. Uniacke was the youngest son of the Hon. Richard John Uniacke, for many years H.M. Attorney-General of Nova Scotia, and the Uniacke family has been prominently identified with the history of that province since the latter end of the eighteenth century, when the aforesaid Richard John Uniacke left his ancestral home in the South of Ireland and settled at Halifax, Nova Scotia.

As an evidence of the fact that the combined firms do not rely upon past achievements and awards to bring success, we would instance the admirable exhibit which they are now making at the Colonial and Indian Exhibition at the Crystal Palace. which was recently opened by the Right Hon. the Lord Mayor of London, Mr. Alderman Pound, himself a highly respected member of the leather goods industry. This exhibit consists of four large exhibition show-cases containing a beautiful assortment of fitted cases and travelling and other bags. They are all masterpieces of the bag makers art. Real crocodile-skin dressing cases lined with watered silk, and fitted with gold and silver-mounted bottles and ivory-backed brushes, produce a charming effect, and these, with collapsible kit bags in crocodile-skin, and Gladstones, kits, and briefs in hide, all testify to the excellence of Messrs. Wolfsky and Co.’s productions.

We will conclude by expressing our hearty good wishes for the future prosperity of these two firms, henceforth running in double harness; and, to pursue the simile, with Mr. Uniacke on the box-seat of the coach, handling the ribbons and guiding the team along the road of commercial success, with Mr. Richards at his side to apply the break if the pace should seem to his experienced eye to be too rapid; Mr. Atkinson and Mr. Webster armed at all points to repel the attacks of possible highwaymen in the shape of unscrupulous competitors; and Mr. Spencer Southgate to blow the horn I–we can confidently wish them “ God speed," and predict a favourable issue to their enterprise.


Source: Saddlery and Harness - 1905

An image of the premises of Wolfsky & Co.Ltd. can be found at: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=19110&p=104199#p104199


Wolfsky & Co.Ltd. entered their marks 'MW' (Moritz Wolfsky) and 'W & Co. Ltd.' with the London Assay Office.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 17, 2014 5:44 am

SILVER & KAYE Ltd.

86a, Hornsey Road, London


Clerkenwell Fire

The premises of Silver & Kaye, manufacturing and repairing jewellers, were badly damaged on the 26th March when fire swept through the building in Clerkenwell Green. About 50 firemen attended the blaze, which is thought to have started amongst waste paper on the staircase at ground floor level.


Source: Jeweller & Metalworker - 1st April 1962


Fire in Workshops

Production in the workshops of Silver & Kaye, manufacturing jewellers, has been temporarily disrupted as a result of a fire which partly gutted their buildings. All the firm's employees escaped without injury. One of the directors, Mr. Alfred Silver, had his hair badly singed, but both he and his partner, Mr. Bernard Kaye, were otherwise unhurt.


Source: Watchmaker, Jeweller & Silversmith - May 1962


SILVER & KAYE LIMITED

Notice is hereby given, in pursuance of sections 290 and 341 (1) (b) of the Companies Act, 1948, that a General Meeting of the above-named Company will be held at 19 Bedford Row, London W.C.1, on Thursday the 25th June 1970 at 11.30 o'clock in the forenoon, for the purpose of having an account laid before the Members showing the manner in which the winding-up has been conducted and the property of the Company disposed of, and of hearing any explanation that! may be given by the Liquidator, and also of determining by Extraordinary Resolution the manner in which the books, accounts and documents of the Company and of the Liquidator shall be disposed of. A Member entitled to attend and vote at the above Meeting may appoint a proxy or proxies to attend and vote instead of him. A proxy need not be a Member of the Company.

Dated 13th May 1970
Martin Walters, Liquidator


Source: The London Gazette - 14th May 1970


SILVER & KAYE LIMITED

Notice is hereby given, pursuant to section 595 of the Companies Act 1985, that General Meetings of Contributories and Creditors of the above-named Company will be held at the office of Pitman Cohen, 9 Savoy Street, London WC2R OBA, on Wednesday, 27th August 1986, at 10 a.m. and 10.15 respectively, for the purposes of having an account laid before the Meetings showing the manner in which the winding-up has been conducted and of hearing any explanation that may be given by the Liquidator.

S. Cohen, Liquidator
14th July 1986.


Source: The London Gazette - 17th July 1986

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 19, 2014 2:02 pm

SANITT & STEIN Ltd.

194, Commercial Road, London


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Sanitt & Stein (Sales) Ltd. - London - 1958


SANITT & STEIN LTD

A Meeting of Creditors of the above-named Company has been summoned by the Liquidator for the purpose of receiving an account of the conduct of the winding-up, pursuant to section 146 of the Insolvency Act 1986, and determining whether the Liquidator should have his release under section 174 of the Insolvency Act 1986. The Meeting will be held at Sidcup House, 12-18 Station Road, Sidcup, Kent DA 15 7EX, on 23rd January 1998, at 10 a.m.
B. Mills, Liquidator
12th December 1997


Source: The London Gazette - 17th December 1997

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Sep 25, 2014 2:56 pm

JUDITH ORIOLE CRAVEN

An example of the work and mark of Judith Oriole Craven, a jam spoon, 5" (12.5cm) in length and weighing 25 grams, assayed at London in 1994:


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JOC - London - 1994

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 28, 2014 4:03 am

BIRTS & SONS

Thomas Street, Woolwich, London

Hearing the crash of breaking glass a policeman in Woolwich, south-east London, investigated and found a man helping himself to jewelry from the window of Birts & Sons. Upon being detained the offender threw the purlioned gems over his head into the roadway where a big crowd scrambled for it. Some of the jewelry was handed back but more than 20 diamond rings and pins are missing. The charge is damaging a £250 plate glass window and stealing £850 worth of gems.

Source: The Jewlers' Circular - 28th June 1922

Birts & Sons were established in 1839, they continue in business today.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Oct 01, 2014 5:38 am

GEORGE DYER

90, Regent Street, and 3, Great Vine Street, Regent Street, London


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George Dyer - London - 1861


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George Dyer - London - 1865

George Dyer was adjudged bankrupt in 1878.

George Dyer entered his marks 'GD' contained within an oblong punch with rounded right and left sides, on the 22nd February 1869, and 'GD' contained within an oval, on the 19th February 1877, both with the London Assay Office.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Mon Oct 06, 2014 9:28 am

ALFRED JAMES HOW

13, Arlington Street, Rosebery Avenue, later, 11, Meredith Street, Clerkenwell


An example of the work and mark of Alfred James How:

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AJH - London - 1900


MR & MRS. JAMES HOW

Carmarthen people will learn with regret that there passed away at 36, Highbury- place, Highbury, London, within a few days of each other, Mr. and Mrs. How, both of whom were over 80 years of age. Mrs. How was a Carmarthen lady, being the sister of the late Mr. David Evans, blacksmith, Spilman-street. Both were well known in the town, which they visited frequently. Mr. How died on Wednesday. the 19th inst., and was to have been buried on Saturday, but the funeral was postponed owing to the death of his wife that day. Mr. How had carried on an extensive business as silversmith, and executed the Doncaster Cup some years ago. He had retired from business for some years. Two sons, both of whom are silversmiths, survive. The funeral of both took place on Wednesday.


Source: Carmarthen Journal - 28th March 1919


James How, a former employee of Charles Stuart Harris, commenced business on his own account in 1897. The business was still operating in 1925, so it was probably continued by the sons mentioned in the above obituary.

Alfred James How entered his mark 'AJH' contained within a rounded shaped punch with points top and bottom, with the London Assay Office on the 11th May 1897.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Mon Oct 06, 2014 1:04 pm

WLADYSLAW GUTOWSKI & Co.

Percy Street, Tottenham Court Road, London


£2,000 JEWEL THEFT

JEWELLER BOUND AND GAGGED

A well-dressed, middle-aged couple are being sought for by the London police respecting the daring robbery of a case containing diamond and sapphire rings belonging to Messrs. Wladyslaw Gutowski and Co., jewel dealers, of Percy street, Tottenham Court- road. The property is said to be worth between £1,500 and £ 2,000. The robbery took place in a block of mansions off the Strand, where the man and woman had taken apartments. Mr. Gutowski states that the man first called at his office in Percv-street and arranged that a collection of rings should be sent to the flat so that the lady might make a selection. Mr. Gutowski took a case of sapphire and diamond rings on Friday, and whilst detailing prices a cloth was thrown over his head and he was fastened to the chair in which he sat, he was blindfolded, and while helpless a number of rings, his gold watch, and some banknotes were taken. The man and woman left and when his cries brought assistance he informed the police that the man was of spare feature. with white hair and moustache, while the woman was of medium build, with dark hair, and probably forty years of age.


Source: Haverfordwest And Milford Haven Telegraph - 24th February 1915

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 07, 2014 10:05 am

THOMAS WORDLEY Ltd.

84, Cannon Street, and 1, St. Swithin's Lane, later, 23, Birchin Lane, London


Thomas Wordley Ltd., jewellers and silversmiths of 23, Birchin Lane, E.C.3., are shortly to discontinue trading after 100 years in the city. This follows the imminent retirement of the firm's managing director Mr. Harry Haylett, who is now in his 84th year and has been with Wordley's for 71 years. He hopes to do business with old customers from his home address during his retirement.

Source: Watchmaker, Jeweller & Silversmith - April 1960


Thomas Wordley Ltd. were established by at least 1889. They were converted into a limited liability company by 1908, the directors being noted as Thomas Wordley, Charles Brannan, and Harris Haylett, the secretary was Robert C. Charlton.

The business entered their mark 'T.W' above '& Co.' contained within an heraldic shield, with the London Assay Office on the 18th June 1908.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Oct 09, 2014 7:09 am

ARTHUR O. FAULKNER

174, High Street, Notting Hill Gate, and, Kimberly House, 98, The Quadrant, Regent Street, and, 90, 167, 203, Regent Street, London



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Arthur Faulkner - London - 1879


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Arthur Faulkner - London - 1881


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Arthur O. Faulkner - London - 1889

Established 1865.


Mr. A. O. Faulkner, jeweller, of 174 High Street, Notting Hill Gate, has recently introduced a substitute for diamonds, which has met with much favour. The stones are composed of real Spanish crystal, but so much do they resemble the much prized gem that practised eyes have been unable to detect them from real diamonds. They appear to possess all the reflecting power of the diamond, and to cut glass, as well as to resist the action of both acids and alkalis. The stones are mounted in gold, are hall-marked, and are finished in the very best style, being at the same time offered at a price which seems, if anything, too reasonable. Those who like to display some jewellery and cannot afford the “ real thing " may safely wear Mr. Faulkner‘s diamonds, for they have nothing in common with the cheap and trashy jewellery with which the market is flooded.

Source: The British Trade Journal - 1st January 1881

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Oct 09, 2014 1:19 pm

LUKE HANCOCK

63, City Road, London

Curious Relic.–Mr Luke Hancock, watchmaker and jeweller, 63, City Road, is exhibiting in his window an old bill which was made out in March, 1780, by his predecessor in the business, Mr. George Mackie, to "The Rev. Mr. Charles Wesley," the two or three items being for the mending of a watch for that distinguished divine.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st October 1889

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Oct 10, 2014 11:40 am

ROBERT PRINGLE & Co.

Wilderness Works, 40 and 42, Clerkenwell Road, London



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Robert Pringle & Co. - London - 1883


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Robert Pringle & Co. - London - 1883


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Robert Pringle & Co. - London - 1885


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Robert Pringle & Co. - London - 1887

A few days since we had the pleasure of being shown over a very extensive and complete factory in the jewellery and silversmith line, belonging to Messrs. Robert Pringle & Co., Wilderness Works, 40 and 42, Clerkenwell Road, London, E.C., established over 50 years since. Here we found what we seldom do in the wholesale, all branches of the trade–gold, silver and gem jewellery making ; gilding, plating, refining, assaying, electro-plate manufactory, and silver-plate making, carried on under one roof, and in the most orderly and scientific manner possible, with every appliance that science and enterprise can suggest. The warehouse, showrooms and offices, are admirably constructed, and the appliances and workers, from the steam engine in the basement to a brigade of female burnishers in the uppermost floor, all working as one machine under able superintendence. What struck us was, that a trade of so many artistic and scientific branches could be carried on so well under one roof till we found out the key, which was this : The genial and practical proprietor, Mr. Robert Pringle, who showed us over the works, is what is called "well buoyed up," that is, he has a multiplicity of sons ; and it was with considerable pride that we were passed from one department to another to be introduced to Messrs. J. & R. Pringle, managers, bullion and refinery department ; Mr. W. Pringle, manager, silversmith department; Mr. E. Pringle, manager, watch department. All this, we must admit, gives the firm a great advantage, and tells well for its prospects in the future, and also ensures a capital market for placing foreign indents. What is to the interest of the buyer is evidently to the interest of the many members of the firm, who are the managers, and to the firm as a whole, and in a business of this kind requiring the exercise of so much skill, care, and practical knowledge, it must be an advantage to Colonial buyers and the export trade, to send indents to a house like Robert Pringle, and Co.'s, where so much personal superintendence is given to filling the orders. Mr. Robert Pringle and his eldest son made a tour of the Colonies some time since, and resided there a considerable time, they are therefore well acquainted with Colonial requirements. Buyers would do well to send for price lists of this firm, which are most comprehensive and useful.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st January 1890



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Robert Pringle & Co. - London - 1893


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Robert Pringle & Co. - London - 1893

Plater's mark of Robert Pringle:
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Established in 1835 by Robert Pringle (I), who arrived in London from Perth (Scotland) in 1820. The business later passed to Robert Pringle (II), who was the subject of the above article. The name of the firm was restyled in 1899 to Robert Pringle & Sons upon Robert Pringle (III) becoming a partner. RP (II) died on the 23rd June 1907, aged 71 years, RP (III) died on the 14th December 1942 (by this time Robert Pringle (IV) was a director of the company). The business was converted into a limited liability company styled Robert Pringle & Sons (London) Ltd. in 1931. The company are still in business today, but have long since moved away from the precious metal trade, and are now an engineering firm.

An image of the Wilderness Works can be found here: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=19110

See: http://www.925-1000.com/silverplate_P3.html

Trev.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Oct 19, 2014 5:08 am

S.J. ROOD & Co.

Burlington Arcade, London


Messrs. S. J. Rood & Co., the Burlington Arcade diamond merchants, are the latest victims of the jewel gang. A well dressed man entered the jewelry store and gave his name as "Viscount Charlemont." He selected a bracelet which he said he would like to show to his wife at the Paddington Hotel. A jewelry assistant accompanied him. At the hotel he said he would like to show it to his attorneys. The bracelet was in his possession when leaving the hotel. At the city offices of the supposed firm the viscount gave the clerk the slip by going in at one entrance and leaving by another. The bracelet is valued at £1.500 and Scotland Yard has issued a description of it as well as the bogus viscount. The real Viscount Charlemont is a representative peer for Ireland.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 27th September 1922

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Mon Oct 20, 2014 1:01 pm

J.B. YABSLEY

72, Ludgate Hill, and 16-20, Farringdon Avenue, later, 35, Ludgate Hill, London


Mr. J. B. Yabsley, jeweller, of 72, Ludgate Hill, has been entrusted with the work of designing and manufacturing the Sheriffs chain and badge, which the inhabitants of the Ward of Farringdon Without have decided to present to their newly-elected Alderman (who enters upon his year of office in the Shrievalty this month), in recognition of his long public services, and the manner in which he conducted the recent Aldermanic contest. Both design and workmanship are excellent ; probably the chain is one of the handsomest of its kind which has ever been made. The collar, which is thirty-eight inches long, is composed of thirty-two links, sixteen of which are pointed oval shields, with handsome scroll borders, and fleur-de-lis ornamental centres ; the other sixteen links are of oblong shape, with Gothic ends, and raised bands across the centre. These are placed alternately, and connected by stout solid oval rings. The central shield bears the monagram "P de K." pierced in gold, and the whole joins a massive and elaborate collar. The badge itself is of elliptic shape, and contains the Arms of the City of London enamelled on a shield, with handsomely carved supporters in bold relief, and a flowing ribbon bearing the motto in blue enamel, " Domine Dirige Nos." These occupy the central part of the badge, whilst above are the Arms, Crest, and Motto of the Sheriff, and beneath those of the Spectacle Makers' Company, of which De Keyser is a member. The whole of the Coats of Arms are beautifully enamelled on separate shields with raised flowing ribbons, bearing their respective mottoes, and are in bold relief, having a background of purple enamel. The border of the badge is studded with fine brilliants, completely encircling the Coats of Arms, and forms a very noticeable feature. The outer border is formed of massive gold scrolls, intersected by the sword and mace, which are also ornamented with the same precious stones. The whole work is of 18-carat gold, and weighs nearly thirty ounces.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 5th August 1882


This business was founded by James Benjamin Yabsley in 1877, he was formerly a manager with J.W. Benson. Yabsley is thought to have died in the final years of the 19th century and the business was continued by Thomas Buckley and William Frederick Lovell. Buckley retired from the business in 1907, leaving Lovell to continue alone.

The firm entered two marks, 'B & L' (Buckley & Lovell) contained within three conjoined circles, on the 6th January 1905, and 'WFL' (William Frederick Lovell) contained within an oblong punch, on the 26th August 1912, both with the London Assay Office.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Oct 25, 2014 10:30 am

LAWRENCE BARNETT PHILLIPS


Death of Lawrence Barnett Phillips, Inventor of Keyless Watch

London. April 21.–The inventor of the keyless watch, Lawrence Barnett Phillips, has just died at his home in west London, after a two weeks' illness. Mr. Phillips, who was born in 1842, in Bloomsbury Square, was. apart from being an authority on watchmaking and chronology, an artist, author, scientist and antiquary. The name of Phillips is well-known here. Members of the watchmaker's family are proprietors of the Leicester Galleries, west London. The keyless watch inventor was only 18 years old when he discovered the principle of the rocking bar mechanism for watch winding, now universally adopted this side by makers of keyless time pieces. Phillips was 19 when he set up in business for himself as a wholesale chronometer and watch manufacturer. When he was 24 he published his "Autographic Album," and while still in his 20's published the "Horological Rating Tables." The inventor retired from business in 1882 and took up painting as a hobby, being a frequent exhibitor at the Royal Academy.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 3rd May 1922

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Nov 13, 2014 7:38 am

WILLIAM FITCHEW

399 & 400, Oxford Street, later, 103, Dean Street, Soho, London


On Friday afternoon, one of the so-called safety cabs, with a spirited horse, dashed into the shop window of Mr. Fitchew, silversmith and silver metal manufacturer, Oxford -street, London, destroying the large panes of glass, together with the sash-frame, scattering the pavement with Mr. Fitchew's valuable stock, a great portion of which was so crushed and bruised as to become only valuable as old silver. Several articles were stolen by the mob, which, in so great a thoroughfare, is soon collected. - The horse was severely cut and otherwise injured, but fortunately the driver escaped with little apparent injury.

Source: The North Wales Chronicle - 7th May 1850


William Fitchew died on the 25th February 1862.

William Fitchew entered his marks 'WF' contained within an oblong punch, on the 27th August 1841 and on the 12th April 1843 with the London Assay office.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 14, 2014 1:06 pm

CHARLES G. FRANKLAND

335, High Holborn, London


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Chas. G. Frankland - London - 1922

Established in 1878.

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