Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

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Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 13, 2012 12:39 pm

SOME OLD JEWELLERS OF NEW ORLEANS (Trade Journal Article - 1890)

Since the days when New Orleans began to receive into her lap the generous yield of that land which is so bounteously watered and enriched by the Mississippi and its tributaries, she has, says Mr. Jno. K. Allen in the 'Jeweller', always demonstrated the wisdom of Bienville which led him to found the city and to counsel the removal to it of the seat of government of the French colony. Her commanding position at the foot of our mightiest river has been maintained through discouragements which would have defeated less hardy pioneers, and-at a cost about which too many may justly complain. Its seat of imperial authority in trade matters in the South, however, has never been resigned to any other city, and, at the present time, her citizens are very hopeful for her future. The fact that New Orleans has been the largest cotton and sugar market and the leading depot in plantation supplies, has drawn to it all the trade of the rich planters of the South, both before the war and since, for all the refinements with which they made their homes attractive and with which their beautiful wives and daughters adorned their persons. Hence the retail jewellery trade and its allied lines have always been important features of New Orleans business.

During a brief visit, made just before Christmas, to that city of sunshine, gardens and flowers, I called upon a few of its many jewellers. The trade preliminary to the holidays was at its full height, and brief interviews were necessary if held at all ; and right here let me say that if Christmas trade all over the country was as good as at New Orleans, the retail jewellers will have little to complain of.

One naturally turns to the beautiful store of A. B. Griswold and Co., at the corner of Canal Street and Rue Royale, as the leading jewellery store in New Orleans. The location is a most excellent one, being under the shadow of the Clay monument, around which all the street cars and other transportation lines centre. Here, with customers several rows deep, I snatched a few words from Mr. Abbott, who has been a long time with the house, and who looks, by the way, much like the late Henry Ward Beecher. This house is, I think, the oldest one in business in Louisiana, having been established in 1817 by Hyde and Goodrich on Chartres Street, then one of the principal streets of that portion of the city now known as the French district. This firm continued in trade until 1856, when the style of the firm became Thomas Griswold and Co. At the close of the war–and let me say the business men of New Orleans who were not ruined by the war were few in number–Thomas Griswold died and the firm became A. B. Griswold and Co. This firm shows a fine line of silverware, bronzes, clocks, watches, gems ,and jewellery, and enjoys a large trade. In the olden times they did about all the business in New Orleans, but now they are pressed very closely by the enterprising house of M. Scooler.

I found Mr. Scooler, the senior member of the firm, in a very happy frame of mind over the Christinas trade which his house was having. He informed me that he established the business in 1842, and had been in business continuously since. He has admitted his son, I. Scooler, and his son-in-law, I. Lowengardt, into business with him, but the style of the firm remains unchanged. Their place of business is at 103 and 105, Canal Street, in the busiest part of that busy street, and in the well arranged show-cases is shown a beautiful stock of diamonds, watches and jewellery. Mr. Scooler informs me that he imports his own bronzes, going abroad annually for that purpose. They carry an extensive line of silverware and clocks, and are sole agents for Patek, Philippe and Co.'s watches.

The lover of the old French quarter of New Orleans will not permit the gay and lively promenaders on Canal Street, or the brilliant stores which line both sides of that wide thoroughfare, to engross his sole attention, but he will turn from Canal into that narrow and badly paved street which the weather-beaten signs at the corners tell you is Rue Royale, and which leads into the very heart of what is still an essentially French district. The overhanging balconies, thronging with a foreign domestic life, the closely battened doors and windows, the open driveways leading into paved and shaded courts with enticing green plants and spray-like fountains, all speak in a language very foreign to our American ears. The traveller who is looking for interesting tilings in the jewellery line will find them here. Little shops presided over by grizzled and moustached Frenchmen, display queer trinkets, old stones taken from dismantled jewellery, old watches undergoing repairs, and other evidences of a trade not well nourished, On the right side of the street, No. 60, your attention will be called to a projecting iron bracket bearing a double dial clock, on the top of which is a bell. Seated on the bell is a representation of a human male figure bearing a hammer with which he strikes the hours. On the wall will be seen another dial, both this and the outside clock being operated by works of a very high character which are visible from the street, a plate of glass set in the wall in the second storey permitting them to be seen. This useful and unique advertisement attracts the stranger's attention to the store of E. Barbier, successor to S. Fournier. Going inside you may lie met, as I was, by a beautiful, dark-eyed French lady who will inform you that Mr.Barbier will be in in a few minutes, and if you sit down to wait for his return you will allow your eyes to wander over a modern and well-kept stock of watches, clocks, diamonds and jewellery. When Mr. Barbier comes in, as he will in a few minutes, you will find him a pleasant gentleman, and possibly the only jeweller in the United States who now owns the business in which he learned his trade. Mr. Fournier came from France and established this business in 1840. In 1853 Mr. Barbier entered as an apprentice, and ultimately succeeded to the business. It is an interesting fact that this house began the manufacture of tower clocks in this country. The Howard and Thomas companies had not begun their manufacture, and such movements as were in the country were imported, This house constructed the first ones made in the United States, and examples of their handiwork are common in New Orleans. The excellent clock in the quaint old cathedral of St Louis is an example of their work, and another is the clock now at the Hospital, but formerly on the Hotel Royale, when it was called the St. Louis Hotel, a beautiful building, possessing more historic interest than any other American hotel.

We now leave the old portion of the city and cross Canal to No. 8, Camp Street, to visit the Nestor of the New Orleans jewellery trade, Mr. H. P. Buckley. Mr. Buckley humorously says, in reply to our query, that he has been in New Orleans about a hundred years, more or less. As he is a hearty and well preserved gentleman, we express some surprise that time has dealt so gently with him, when he replies that it ought to, as he has always been gentle with Time. This delicate allusion to his deftness as a watchmaker is ingeniously made. Mr. Buckley put out his sign in 1853, though he was in New Orleans long before that. He carries a general line of jewellery and watches and reports a satisfactory business. Going back on Canal Street to No. 115, we enter one of A. M. Hill's stores, the other being at 8I and 86, St. Charles Street. Mr. Hill is too busy to talk, but a few well-directed questions elicit the information that he came to New Orleans after the war and cut stencils, repaired gold pens, and did such work until he secured an opening in business, since which time he has built up a large business and acquired a fortune, it is said, of 250,000 dollars. Mr. Hill has a general reputation for keeping " standard time," and this, as every jeweller knows, is a very enviable reputation to possess.

It would not be a fair review of the jewellery trade of the city of New Orleans were we to omit mention of the firm of Leonard Krower and Co., of 31, Chartres Street, the only firm in the South, we are told, which combines manufacturing with jobbing. A call upon these gentlemen showed that the busy season was still with them. We were informed, however, that their business during the year has been a very successful one, and they are obliged constantly to enlarge their facilities. Among the novelties they have brought out was the very successful cotton-bale clock. This firm extends a hearty invitation to all jewellers who may visit New Orleans during the great Sajngerfest to make their headquarters at their very convenient store. My judgment, formed after these interviews with representatives of the business in the South, leads me to state that trade in that section is in a prosperous and promising condition, and I am confident that jobbers will be called on largely to increase their sales in the South in the near future.


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st March 1890

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans - 1890

Postby dognose » Wed Aug 15, 2012 8:40 am

A.B. GRISWOLD & Co. (Late Hyde & Goodrich)

Corner of Canal and Royal Streets

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A.B. Griswold & Co. - New Orleans - 1869

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A.B. Griswold & Co. - New Orleans - 1873

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A.B. Griswold & Co. - New Orleans - 1891

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A.B. Griswold & Co.Ltd. - New Orleans - 1908

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A.B. Griswold & Co.Ltd. - New Orleans - 1908

Hyde & Goodrich (James Nevin Hyde [b.1788-d.1838] and Charles Whiting Goodrich [b.1780-d.1859]) 1816 - c.1860
Thomas, Griswold and Co. (Henry Thomas Jr. and Arthur Breese Griswold) c.1860 - c.1865
A.B. Griswold & Co. c.1865 -


E. L. Roane, vice-president and treasurer of A. B. Griswold & Co., 728 Canal St., spent his younger days on a farm in Mississippi, and made a specialty of raising vegetables for the markets in the big cities, but long years of attention to the exacting details incident to large jewelry business has not dulled his cunning nor lessened his fondness for gardening. To make a long story short, Mr. Roane's services are in constant demand at the present time on account of the almost universal planting of the vegetables in every lot, side and back yard. Numerous friends have called upon him for advice and practical instruction, and he is giving it gladly and liberally.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 2nd May 1917


William A Cosby, formerly with A. B. Griswold & Co., is now with Coleman E. Adler. Mr. Cosby was with the Griswold. house 26 years, when he resigned to accept a more lucrative position with a wholesale grocer house, but on account of having some trouble with his eyes he had to give up that position.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 18th December 1918


Employees of the A. B. Griswold & Co. are telling of the look of amazement upon the face of Henry Ginder, president of thecompany, when he reached his desk on the morning of Dec. 6. His desk was banked with flowers and in the center was a silver loving cup. Then he remembered he was 87 years old that day, and upon reading the inscription on the cup found it was from the officers and employees of the company. Not only had Mr. Ginder reached his 87th birthday anniversary, but he has completed 67 years of continuous service with the Griswold store.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 18th December 1918


A. B. GRISWOLD & CO.
Importers of Watches, Diamonds, Jewelry and Silverware, Corner of Canal and Royal Streets.
This hale and vigorous representative of the historical houses of New Orleans, has passed its sixtieth year of continuous transactions, as sound, reliable and progressive as when its affairs were directed by the high-spirited and broad-minded merchant whose name it still bears, although he has long since passed away. Mr. Hyde, the founder of the house, settled in New Orleans away back in the twenties. He commenced business at the corner of Chartres and St. Louis streets. "His little store," says an account published of that era, "was then filled with a motley assortment of merchandise suitable to the wants of the community at that early period, and did not have the distinctive character it now bears. There the Creole of the town orfrom the plantations could buy a pair of ear-rings or a straw hat; a silver mug or a tin bucket; a wedding ring or a flat iron; in fact, though the amount of stock was limited enough, the same could not be said of its variety, and the old colored porter of the firm used frequently to say that he had belonged to the firm from the time when he could carry the whole stock in trade -on his back."
Until his decease, some seven years ago, Mr. A. B. Griswold was continually a member of the firm and was long its guiding spirit. Since his death, Mr. Henry Ginder has managed the business, retaining the designation by which the house is so widely known and esteemed. Hyde & Goodrich was the original title taken by the house. Under this name a uniform course of upright dealings gradually expanded the business of the house, and by painstaking selections of goods the house soon came into the highest repute for its wares and merchandise, particularly in the line of watches, jewelry and silverware, which fact doubtless directed it toward that exclusive line of trade. In the halcyon days of the city this house had a great Mexican trade in assorted merchandise, the diversion of which commerce from the city, later, affecting the change to a special branch, with the causes just mentioned.
Another quotation from the interesting sketch above alluded to, will perhaps more briefly convey the story of the growth of this time-honored establishment:
"In 1853, the firm removed for the third time to their present stand, at the corner of Canal and Royal Streets, one of that beautiful row known as the Touro buildings. Canal street had not at this time assumed its full rank as the main business artery of New Orleans, but was taking rapid strides towards it. Judah Touro, the wealthy Israelite who built and owned this fine block, aware of the importance of securing first-class tenants and desiring to attract trade from Chartres street to Canal street, offered Messrs. Hyde & Goodrich a very advantageous lease if they make the first move–some four or five prominent firms in the same street agreeing to move if they did. At the same time the Baroness de Pontalba, who had recently completed the two fine rows of stores on either side of Jackson Square (then Place d'armes), used every effort to induce the firm to return toward their original location, offering them the choice of the stores with a two years' lease, free of rent. Very wisely, as results proved, the}' decided on taking no backward step, but following the indications of the march of business, embraced the offer of Touro, and were the first, as they have been the only occupants of the Corner of Canal and Royal streets for the last twenty years. Some years before the war, Mr. Hyde retired from the firm, and occupied himself with attending to its business in New York as an agent."
Other changes in the personnel of the firm caused by death, retirement, etc., finally resulted in the appellation now honored in the commercial world as that of a strictly firstclass house. The house is the Southern depot for the silverware of the famous Gorham Manufacturing Co. It has the finest assortment of the wares of that company in the South, and from photographic designs which it holds, can execute at short notice any orders for articles not in its stock. A. B. Griswold & Co. are also agents for the Seth Thomas Clock Co., who make the most reliable tower clocks, with illuminated dials, to order. Up-stairs in A. B. Griswold & Co.'s establishment is the repair department and workshops, where Swiss or English watches are put in perfect order, and the most delicate specimens of the goldsmiths' and enamelers art are produced. In this latter industry, as well as with their silverware, A. B. Griswold & Co. have repeatedly distanced all competitors at the State Fairs of the Southern States. A Handbook for Purchasers of Silverware, published by the house and furnished upon application, is a most useful work for intending buyers.
The extraordinary resources and ample facilities of this house for the selection and purchase of foreign and domestic jewelry, diamonds, watches, clocks, bronzes, etc., are so well understood to the trade that contemporary houses make no pretensions to rivalry. Having maintained a New York and European agency for forty years, they have many advantages that are denied to firms of lesser importance. The house invites inspection of its goods and comparison of its prices with those of other establishments. Strangers especially welcomed.


Source: The industries of New Orleans: her rank, resources, advantages, trade, commerce and manufactures, conditions of the past, present and future, representative industrial institutions, historical, descriptive, and statistical. - Andrew Morrison - 1885



Henry Ginder, of New Orleans, formerly an officer of engineers in the Confederate States service, was born at Covington, Ky., in 1831, but was reared from infancy in the city where he now resides. When hostilities began in 1861 he enlisted in the State troops for local defense, and served in that line of duty until after the capture of the city, when he went to Corinth, and enlisted in the Crescent regiment, with which he served during the siege of that place by the Federal army, and until the disbandment of the regiment. He enlisted as a private in Fenner"s Battery, and remained in it until, at Port Hudson, engineers were needed to lay out and build the fortifications at that point. General Gardner, learning that he had been an engineer, employed for five years on the United States coast survey, transferred him to the engineering corps with the rank and pay of first lieutenant. He was on duty at Port Hudson while it was being fortified and during the first attack by the Federal fleet, and afterward was ordered to Vicksburg, where he served during the siege of May 18 to July 4, 1863. After his exchange, three months later, he was ordered to join the engineer troops under General Chalmers, and subsequently under Gen. N. B. Forrest. While associated with these famous cavalrymen he took part in the battles of Harrisburg, Miss., Franklin and Nashville, and an encounter with Wilson's raiders in Alabama. During the retreat from Tennessee in the winter of 1864 he served with the rear guard and rendered important duties under General Forrest. After that gallant leader surrendered his forces, Lieutenant Ginder returned to New Orleans and resumed his former occupation as a merchant jeweler. He is now a member of one of the most prominent jewelry firms of the city, is highly regarded by his fellow citizens, and is a member and elder of the Prytania street Presbyterian church.

Source: Confederate Military History - Volume 10 - Clement Anselm Evans - 1899


Mrs. D. S. Ramelli, mother of D. S. Ramelli, foreman of the Griswold manufacturing department, died last week, in her 85th year. She was the mother of five sons, and leading a most exemplary life, was esteemed and loved by all who knew her.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th November 1921


Alexander Sirjacques, a pioneer jeweler of New Orleans, who for 46 years was foreman of the manufacturing department of A. B. Griswold & Co., died Jan. 8. Mr. Sirjacques was 81 years of age. For the past year he has been too ill to attend the duties of his position. He was a highly respected citizen.

Source: The Jewelers Circular - 24th January 1923


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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans - 1890

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 19, 2012 1:36 am

E. PRIOLLAUD

1, Carondelet Street, New Orleans

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E. Priollaud - New Orleans - 1866

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans - 1890

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 20, 2012 6:43 pm

F. STEUBENRAUCH

27, Chartres Street, New Orleans

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F. Steubenrauch - New Orleans - 1856

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans - 1890

Postby dognose » Wed Aug 22, 2012 3:06 pm

COLEMAN E. ADLER & SONS

722, Canal Street, New Orleans

Founded in 1898 by Coleman E. Adler who arrived in New Orleans from New York. He established their first shop on Royal Street in the French Quarter, and in 1904 removed to 722, Canal Street which is still their location at the present day. The business passed to Coleman's sons, Walter and Milton Adler, and today Coleman E. Adler II, the founder's grandson, controls the company.


Coleman E. Adler has added a big manufacturing plant which occupies the entire second floor of his building, corner Customhouse and Royal streets. The plant is strictly up to date in every appointment and is fitted for the manufacture of everything in the trade, including diamond cutting.

Source: Jeweler's Review - Volume 32 - 5th April 1899


Sol A. Reis, one of the leading clerks of Coleman E. Adler, 722 Canal St., is receiving the condolence of his friends on account of the death of his aged mother.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 2nd May 1917


Leo L. Jackson, who has been connected with Coleman E. Adler, 722 Canal St., as an engraver for over five years, enlisted during the week in a cavalry command and will go into training at the regular camp here. As a token of appreciation of his services and commendation of his sacrifice to serve his country, Mr. Jackson was presented with a handsome gold wrist watch by Mr. Adler and the employes of the firm. Mr. Jackson was the recipient of scores of congratulations from numerous friends and relatives.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 2nd May 1917


Coleman E. Adler, Canal St jeweler, as has been his custom for many years, this year gave each of his large corps of employes a handsome reminder of the season of good will and hospitality. The distribution of gifts was followed by something in the way of good cheer–a lay-out fully up to the standard of excellence in former years and for which Mr. Adler has long been noted. An interesting feature of the occasion, of course, was the speech-making, expressive of sentiments appropriate to the occasion, compliments to the generosity and thoughtfulness of the "Boss," to his kindly consideration for those who serve him and wishes for a long, happy and prosperous life.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 3rd January 1923

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans - 1890

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 26, 2012 7:53 am

GUINNESS & HILL

56, Camp Street, New Orleans


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Guinness & Hill - New Orleans - 1853

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans - 1890

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 26, 2012 2:45 pm

M. SCOOLER

103 and 105 Canal St., New Orleans

Maurice Scooler was born at Wurtzberg, Bavaria in 1814, he died at New Orleans on the 25th April 1900.


M. Scooler, 103 and 105 Canal St., New Orleans, La., has begun a thorough remodeling of his store, under the direction of the well-known firm of B. & W. B. Smith, New York. Owing to the delay consequent upon the approaching holiday season, Mr. Scooler will not begin until spring. The entire store will be redecorated, the floors will be tiled and the cases on both sides will be lighted by electricity. The arrangement for illumination will be complete making a veritable jewelry palace, such as is not to be excelled in any city of the Union.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - Volume 23 - 30th September 1891



M. Scooler was awarded by Temple Sinai the contract to make the resolutions presented to Dr. J. M. Weiss, of Cincinnati. The gift is a model of art, bound in black leather with silver adornments. In the center is an American shield bearing the inscription of the presentation to the distinguished Dr. Weiss on the occasion of his eightieth birthday, Marcn 14, 1899. Tlu execution was so masterly that the Rev. Max Heller sent J. Lowengardt, of Scooler's, a testimonial of appreciation.

Source: Jewelers Review - Volume 32 - 5th April 1899



The silver bell, manufactured by M. Scooler of this city, and the silver service, manufactured by the Gorham Co. for A. B. Griswold & Co., of this city, were presented yesterday to the U. S. cruiser New Orleans. The officers of the cruiser New Orleans were assembled at the press club last night and were presented with an engraving on silver of the battleship Maine entering Havana harbor. The engraving, which as a very fine work of art, is the work of Mr. D. A. Walter, of the Walter & Schaffnit Company, and was made by Mr. Walter a year ago especially for presentation to the cruiser New Orleans. As soon as it was known that the Amazonas was to be rechristened the New Orleans Mr. Walter began his work, copying the wellknown photograph from which was copied the familiar design of the war revenue stamp.

Source: Jewelers Review - Volume 32 - 7th June 1899


M. Scooler is making a unique ring for a wedding ring of one of the prominent society men of this section. The ring consists of three diamonds and two pearls, set in a French loop. The center diamond is a carat and a half, absolutely perfect blue white, old mine stone. The pearls are pure white and round, weighing twenty grains each. The other two diamonds completing the five settings are three-fourths of a carat each.

Source: Jewelers Review - Volume 32 - 21st June 1899



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New Orleans, La, Aug. 6 - There is a general feeling of sorrow in the jewelery trade over the death, last week, of Isidore Scooler, of the jewelery house M. Scooler, who passed away on Sunday at 12-10 AM. Mr. Scooler died after a lingering illness, having suffered for three years from the effects of an accident. When Mr. Scooler received the injury it was not thought to be dangerous, but it developed into a cancer that later grew so bad that he was operated on. This gave no relief and amputation of his leg was necessary. His system, however, had been affected and though he was given the best of medical treatment the physicians were unable to cure him and three months ago he took to his bed, there remaining until his death. Mr. Scooler, who was familiarly known among his many friends in the jewelry trade as "Dory," was born in New Orleans 43 years ago, and was the son of M. Scooler, one of the best known jewelers of the south. The deceased was educated in this city and after leaving Soules's College, commenced his business career with his father. About 20 years ago he was admitted as a partner in the firm and by his energy and ability did much to contribute to the success of his house. After the death of his father, a little over a year ago, Isidore Scooler, with his mother and I. Lowengardt, conducted the business under the old name. About 10 years ago Mr. Scooler married Miss Ruth Hirsch, and his widow and one child survive him. He is also survived by his mother, four sisters and one brother. The deceased was universally popular, was noted for his many manly characteristics and his genial and charitable nature. He was a fine specimen of physical manhood and was fond of athletic sports, in which he was quite prominent. He was a member of the Harmony Club, Louisiana Gun Club, the West End Rowing Club, the Southern Yacht Club, the Essenic Knights, the Stonewall Guards and the Carnival Organizations. He was also a member of the Temple Sinai congregation. The funeral services were largely attended and the interment was in the old Gentilly Cemetery. The business will be continued by the surviving partners, Mr. Scooler's mother and brother-in-law, I. Lowengardt, without change in the firm name.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - Volume 45 - 13th August 1902




Two years ago the people of New Orleans contributed $2,000 in silver dimes to be used in molding a silver bell to be used on the cruiser named for the city, which at that time was lying in ordinary at the Mare Island Navy Yard. The sum collected was sufficient to furnish one of the handsomest and largest bells of its kind in the American Navy.
The contract for molding the bell was awarded to M. Schooler, an expert silversmith of New Orleans. He realized that he could make several hundred dollars by casting the bell of brass and giving it a heavy silver plate. His crookedness was soon detected, and he was arrested and convicted. The judge in passing sentence stated that he was sorry that 10 years was the extreme punishment that could be given a man that would so deliberately defraud the public.
The misrepresented bell was shipped to this coast and has been safely guarded in a vault on Mare Island until last Tuesday, when Chief Carpenter Toles hung it in its proper place–on the bow of the hurricane deck. The New Orleans having been out of commission for three years and a half, it was not deemed necessary to install the bell until it was ready for sea service again. The repair work is completed and officers and men of the monitor Cheyenne were transferred to the New Orleans.
The New Orleans is of the same class as the Albany. Like that cruiser, it was built in England in 1898 for the Brazilian Navy. The New Orleans was to have been known as the Amazonas, but upon its purchase by the United States, just before the outbreak of the war with Spain, its name was changed to the New Orleans.
The New Orleans is 345 feet in length, with a breadth of 43.9 feet and depth of 16.10 feet, and has a displacement of 3,430 tons, and a speed of 20 knots an hour.


Source: Our Navy - The Standard Publication of the U.S. Navy - Volume 3 - 1909

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans - 1890

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 30, 2012 5:31 am

FRANCOIS F. BRUNET

313, Royal Street, New Orleans

Francois F. Brunet, 313 Royal street, has been awarded the contract for a diamond cross, to be presented to the archbishop of this diocese by the Catholics of the city.

Source: Jewelers Review - Volume 32 - 5th April 1899


Miss Jeanne Cora Brunet, daughter of F. A. Brunet, the Royal St. jeweler, has won distinction as a Liberty Loan orator. Miss Brunet is visiting her sister, Mrs. W. H. Brown, in Goldberg, Idaho. Recently a party was made up in that town to go out to May, Idaho, to hold a Liberty Loan rally, and Miss Brunet was one of the party. One of the leading attorneys who was on the program asked Miss Brunet if she would not speak. Miss Brunet did and her speech brought a storm of applause and was so good that she was asked to deliver it at another town. It resulted in selling many bonds, and when her father received the news in a letter from Mrs. Brown he at once went out and subscribed to another Liberty Bond, which he will present to his daughter when she returns.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 1st May 1918


Miss J. Cora Brunet, daughter of Francois A. Brunet, a jeweler on Royal St., received recently a medal made of captured German cannon metal which was sent to her in recognition of her efforts in the Victory Loan campaign. Miss Brunet, while visiting in Idaho made several strong speeches that were effective.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 21st January 1920


May 23 was the 67th birthday anniversary of F. A. Brunet, 313 Royal St., an event properly celebrated and accompanied by congratulations of numerous friends. Mr. Brunet conducts, if A. B. Griswold & Co. be excepted, the oldest jewelry establishment in New Orleans. Coming to this country in 1877 from Anjouleme, France, he settled in this city and has since made it his home, marrying and rearing a family here and building up a business which has not only kept pace with the times but gives assurance to him and those about him of a generous competence during the remainder of his life. His expert knowledge of all matters pertaining to the trade, the taste displayed in the arrangement of his attractive store and its contents, and his reputation for correct dealing have had much to do with the success that has come to him during all these years. In the conduct of his business Mr. Brunet has the intelligent and experienced aid of his two daughters, Miss Cora and Miss Adrienne Brunet–the one as the bookkeeper of the establishment, the other assisting her father as saleslady, and both invaluable in the discharge of their respective responsibilities. Mr. Brunet is affiliated with many organizations, social and benevolent; is a philosopher in the most literal sense of the word, a good citizen and a friend in every respect worthy of the name.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 31st May 1922

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans - 1890

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 30, 2012 6:13 am

KOCH & DREYFUS

18, Chartres Street, New Orleans

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Leon Dreyfus, an old and respected member of the trade and at one time one of the best known jewelery jobbers of the south, died suddenly Wednesday morning of heart failure at his residence, 45 E. 92nd St., New York. Mr. Dreyfus had not been ill prior to his death, though his heart had troubled him somewhat for a few years back. The deceased was for 34 years junior member of the well known firm of Koch & Dreyfus and their successors, Koch, Dreyfus & Co. Mr. Dreyfus was born in Ingenheim, in Rhenish Bavaria, Germany, in 1842, and when 15 years old came to the United States. His wife's brother, Nathan Koch, had then been established some years as a jobber in jewelry in New Orleans, La., and Mr. Dreyfus went to that city and obtained employment with his brother-in- law. After being in business for about five years and mastering the details thereof, Mr. Dreyfus was admitted into partnership with Mr. Koch, the firm becoming Koch & Dreyfus. From 1861 until 1889 the firm continued in business in New Orleans, building up a large trade, but in the latter year determined to change their location to New York. In New York the firm occupied quarters at 22 John St., and for a short while business prospered; but before they could build up a trade in their new location, the panic of '93 came on, and after vainly attempting to keep up for about three or four years, the firm were finally forced by business reverses to suspend in January of 1897. They, however, effected a settlement with their creditors, but did not resume. During his stay in New Orleans Mr. Dreyfus was well known and prominent in affairs of that city. Among the retail jewelers of the south to whom he was known personally, he was highly respected and had many close personal friends. During the early part of his career in that city, at the beginning of the Civil War, he was one of the few abolitionists in the south. The deceased was a man of wide learning and was a thorough student. He was connected with many of the charitable organizations both in New Orleans and New York, but was a member of no societies, fraternities or clubs. He is survived by a widow and seven children, the eldest of whom, a son, is connected with the jobbing business of Jonas Koch, a nephew of the deceased. The funeral services over the body of the deceased were held from his late residence early Friday morning, and the interment took place in the Union Fields cemetery, at Cypress Hills.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 12th October 1898


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Koch & Dreyfus - New Orleans - 1884

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 02, 2012 11:09 am

E.A. TYLER

39, Camp Street, later, 110, Canal Street, and later, 115, Canal Street, New Orleans

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An image of the premises at 115, Canal Street from 1873. The firm of E.A. Tyler were thought to have been in business at New Orleans for the period 1838 until 1879.

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E.A. Tyler - New Orleans - 1853

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E.A. Tyler - New Orleans - 1856

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E.A. Tyler - New Orleans - 1868

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E.A. Tyler - New Orleans - 1869

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E.A. Tyler - New Orleans - 1871

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 04, 2012 12:42 pm

I.C. LEVI

108, Canal Street, New Orleans

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I.C. Levi - New Orleans - 1875

Established in 1858.

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Thu Sep 06, 2012 4:51 am

H.P. BUCKLEY

8, Camp Street, New Orleans

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H.P. Buckley - New Orleans - 1868

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H.P. Buckley - New Orleans - 1891

Henry Peat Buckley is thought to have started in the trade in 1842. In 1853 he succeeded the business of Young & Co. which he appears to have controlled up unto 1903.

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Thu Sep 13, 2012 4:08 am

YOUNG & Co.
(late Nelson A. Young)

8, Camp Street, New Orleans

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Young & Co. - New Orleans - 1853

The former business of Nelson A. Young was acquired by Henry Peat Buckley (see above post) in 1853.

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 16, 2012 10:40 am

C.H. ZIMMERMANN

94 & 96, Canal Street, New Orleans

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C.H. Zimmermann - New Orleans - 1868

A butter dish manufactured by C.H. Zimmermann was one of the exhibits displayed in the 'Marks of Achievement, Four Centuries of American Presentation Silver' Exhibition, held at the Houston Museum of Fine Arts in 1987.

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 18, 2012 3:29 am

S.H. SELIGMAN

65, Baronne Street, New Orleans

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S.H. Seligman - New Orleans - 1875

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Thu Sep 20, 2012 4:00 am

W.S. MORGAN

37, Canal Street, New Orleans

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W.S. Morgan - New Orleans - 1848

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 21, 2012 3:27 am

A. SIMON

93, Dauphin Street, New Orleans

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A. Simon - New Orleans - 1854

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Sat Sep 22, 2012 11:18 am

RUFUS L. BRUCE

11, Camp Street, New Orleans

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Rufus L. Bruce - New Orleans - 1848

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 26, 2012 5:17 pm

C.S. DUGGAN

26, Camp Street, New Orleans

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C.S. Duggan - New Orleans - 1854

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Fri Oct 05, 2012 5:43 pm

A.J. GIURANOVICH

126, Royal Street, New Orleans

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A.J. Giuranovich - New Orleans - 1891

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A.J. Giuranovich - New Orleans - c.1890

Established in 1875.

As can be seen from the above advertisements, A.J. Giuranovich served three years with Verax in Paris, and nine years with I.C. Levi in New Orleans.

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