Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 08, 2013 11:02 am

LAWRENCE & MAYO

67 & 69, Chancery Lane, London, 16, Old Court House Street, Calcutta, 16, Mount Street, Madras, Forbes Street, Bombay

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Lawrence & Mayo -Calcutta, Madras, and Bombay - 1892

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Lawrence & Mayo - London - 1916

The London based firm of Opticians and Scientific Instrument Makers, Lawrence & Mayo opened its first Indian office and showroom in Calcutta in the year 1877, they were to open offices throughout India, and at Ceylon, Burma, Spain, Portugal, Singapore, and Egypt.

By 1897 the business was in the hands of Sydney Lawrence alone. In 1938 Lawrence & Mayo was incorporated under the Indian Companies Act 1913, as a private limited company, at this point in time the business was in the hands of L.H. Alliston. I.C.Mendonsa acquired the Indian Operations in 1943, and since 1967 the firm has been wholly Indian owned. They are still in business today and maintains branches throughout India.

Lawrence & Mayo entered their marks with the London Assay Office. On the 15th October 1901, they entered a punch 'L&M' contained within two conjoined circles, on the 20th August 1906 'LM' incuse and without outline, and on the 12th April 1907, another 'L&M' contained within two conjoined circles.


An Indian Crow and his Nest.–The following singular act of systematic theft, carried on by a crow, is literally true. Messrs. Lawrence and Mayo, opticians, have a place of business in Rampart Row, Bombay, and rooms also in Forbes Street, where pebbles and the frames for spectacles are manufactured. The assistant in charge of the latter found out quite recently that a large number of gold, silver, and steel spectacle frames had very mysteriously disappeared. The men employed were at first suspected; orders were given that no one but the manager should have access to the room. The thefts, however, continued day by day; the manager could find out nothing. One Thursday, however, whilst attending to his work, he was startled by hearing the flapping of a bird's wings at the window, and saw a large crow, which, when it had picked up a frame in its beak, flew away in the direction of the building occupied by Messrs Greaves, Cotton & Co. The bird was observed to carry the frame which it had stolen on to the roof of their building; and permission having been obtained from the occupiers of the premises to go over the roof, the assistant found that the thieving bird had constructed thereon for itself a cosy and comfortable nest, composed of the missing frames. The design of this gold and silver structure was so ingenious, and presented such a beautiful appearance, being so deftly and carefully woven together, that it was decided to keep it intact for a time, and before the materials were unwoven and separated, Messrs. Lawrence and Mayo had a photograph of the nest taken. There were altogether eighty-four frames, of the aggregate value of about 500 rupees (£50), which had been stolen by the bird, and were it not for the fact that it was discovered in time, the poor workmen of the establishment would, no doubt, have got into trouble.

Source: The Selborne Magazine and "Nature Notes" - Volume 7 - 1896

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 25, 2013 11:24 am

LOWE & Co.

Mount Road, Madras

Established at Madras in 1843 by Alexander Lowe. Having served an apprenticeship at London under Thomas Penryn as from 1817, Alexander Lowe arrived in Madras in c.1825 to take up a position with George Gordon & Co.. He stayed with Gordon's and was appointed a partner in 1831, he appears have left the firm in c.1842 to form his own business.

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Lowe & Co. were in business at Madras until 1870.

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 27, 2013 4:57 am

ALEXANDER WILSON

Council House Street, Calcutta

Advertised on the 2nd June 1791:

A. Wilson, Watch-maker, in Council House Street, has for sale
A Few Capital Watches, in Gold and Metal, by the most Eminent Makers, viz., Brookbank, Hill, Perigal, Siday, Ellicott, etc., Amongst which is one on a new and Singular Construction, Horizontal, Capp'd, Jewelled, and Stop, which goes while winding up, and by a separate hand and circle shows the three hundredth part of a minute.


Alexander Wilson arrived at Calcutta in 1790, he died there, on the 23rd June 1796.

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 29, 2013 6:19 am

K. P. MOOKERJEE & Co.

Calcutta

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K. P. MOOKERJEE & CO. This firm is credited with the honour of being the oldest established engravers in the city of Calcutta, and they make a speciality of engraving on presentation articles, as well as on all kinds of metals, wood, brass, brass and silver stamp's and badges, and upon half-tone, line, and tri-colour blocks. The manufacture of rubber stamps is another leading feature of the firm's industries. Mr. Kally Prasanna Mookerjee, the proprietor of the firm, started business life in 1868 by entering the engraving shop of his father, the late Babu Durga Das Mookerjee, who had inherited the property from his maternal uncle, H. C. Gangooly, who left Calcutta in 1857 in order to illustrate the Comus newspaper, then being edited by one Captain Moore, and he died at Delhi. Mr. K. P. Mookerjee named the firm H. C. Gangooly & Co. to perpetuate the name of his grand-uncle (who, by the way, had opened the engraving shop in the year 1833), and he conducted the business for twenty-two years with great success, drawing to it many of the most prominent persons of India. He then retired in favour of his younger brothers, and commenced trading on his own account as K. P. Mookerjee & Co.. The firm have commodious premises at 7 Waterloo Street, in the very heart of the city, and they are described as stationers, printers, and dealers in fancy goods, perfumery, jewellery, pictures, mouldings, and miscellaneous goods, the majority of which are imported from England. The printing press is engaged in artistic and general jobbing, and in turning out books of all descriptions. Messrs. Mookerjee & Co. also undertake painting in oils, the enlarging and colouring of photographs, and the framing of pictures. The commission agency department is being extended very rapidly, and goods of all kinds are regularly imported for customers, while their wide circle of patrons and friends includes residents in England, France, Italy, and other European countries.

Source: Bengal and Assam, Behar and Orissa. Their History, People, Commerce, and Industrial Resources - Compiled by Somerset Playne FRGS, assisted by J.W. Bond. Edited by Arnold Wright - 1917

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 06, 2013 4:50 am

YADAV & COMPANY

Delhi and Moradabad

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Yadav & Company - Delhi - 1962

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 21, 2013 10:52 am

DHIREN DAS & SONS

34 Sambhu Nath Pandit St., Bhowanipur, Calcutta 25

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Known to have been working in Calcutta in the early 1950's.

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 24, 2013 12:50 pm

OKELL & OWEN

17, St. James Street, Liverpool, and Bombay

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Okell & Owen (George Okell, George McLaren, and Richard Robert Owen) were East India merchants based in Liverpool and Bombay. They were established in 1867 and their Bombay operations were styled with the reversed name of Owen & Okell.

On the 18th October 1899 they entered their mark 'OO' contained within an oval punch with a pointed top and bottom, with the Chester Assay Office.

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Mon May 06, 2013 3:11 pm

ARDESHIR & BYRAMJI, later, ARDESHIR & Co.

10, Hummum Road, Bombay, and 22, Oxford Street, London


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Ardeshir & Byramji - Bombay and London - 1893

The business of Jewanji Ardeshir and Cursetji Byramji was established c.1890 and was in business importing Indian art until 1905 when the name of the business was restyled to Ardeshir & Co.. The business closed in 1909.

Ardeshir & Byramji were recorded as exhibitors at the Chicago Exhibition of 1893.

They entered their mark 'JA' contained within a heart shaped punch, with the London Assay Office, on the 11th December 1893.

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 18, 2013 5:25 am

CHARLES, NEPHEW & Co.

Old Court House Street, Calcutta, and Allenville, Simla

Charles Nephew & Co.
N.B. - As C.N. & Co. curtail their advertisements considerably during the hot season, they beg to remind their Friends that they publish a Catalogue, which will be found very useful in aiding non-residents to make their selections; and the same will be forwarded free, on application.


Calcutta - 30th April 1863


An example of the work and marks of Charles, Nephew & Co.:

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Charles, Nephew & Co. were established in 1848 by Charles John Pittar, his nephew, Parke Pittar II, and Thomas Powell. The business were the successors to Pittar & Co. They opened their branch at Simla in 1866. Thomas Powell left the business in 1853 and the firm closed both of their branches in 1870.

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See: http://www.925-1000.com/AngloIndian_01.html

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Thu Jun 27, 2013 7:24 am

CROPLEY & Co.

Old Court House Street, Calcutta

Edward Cropley established his business at Calcutta in 1819, his partners included his brother, James Pembroke Cropley, Charles Dolton, and possibly Thomas Thompson. Both Dolton and Thompson had formerly been partners in John Hunt & Co. Edward Cropley had previously been in business at Frith Street, Soho, London.

In his application to reside at Calcutta, Cropley provided three references, they were issued by Samuel Cohen, Diamond Merchant, of Bevis Marks, W. Gray, Jeweller, of Bond Street, and Edmund Smith, Jeweller, of Maddox Street. Futher detail of Edmund Smith can be found at:
viewtopic.php?f=75&t=31597

PARTNERSHIPS DISSOLVED
DOLTON Charles, of London, and Edward Cropley, of Calcutta, East Indies, Jewellers and Goldsmiths, 31 Dec. 1823


Edward Cropley closed his business at Calcutta in 1825 and returned to London, however he returned to India in 1829 and became an Indigo Planter.

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See: http://www.925-1000.com/AngloIndian_01.html

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Tue Aug 06, 2013 1:43 pm

F.P. BHUMGARA & Co.

5, Mount Road, Madras. Kalba Devil Road, Bombay. Armistar and Kashmir. 135, London Wall, London, and 524, Broadway, New York

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Bhumgara & Co. - New York - 1897

Exporters of Swami silverware and jewellery and other Oriental wares.

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Framgee Pestonjee Bhumgara opened offices in London in the late 1880's. Following an audience with Queen Victoria, he was appointed a jeweller to the court. They opened their New York branch in 1894 and exhibited at the 1893 Chicago Exposition and St. Louis in 1904.

The firm was later (by 1913) styled Faredoon J. Bhumgara and had offices at 28, Camomile Street, London.

F.P. Bhumgara & Co. entered their mark F.P above B contained within an heraldic shield, with the London Assay Office on the 29th September 1891.


Swami Jewellery.–The Parsee merchant, Mr. Framjee Pestonjee Bhumgara, a letter to whom from the Duke of Fife appeared recently in the papers, has been engaged in an attempt to open up a market in this country for the beautiful "swami" jewellery and other ornamental work in carved metals of Southern India. Some time ago he visited England for the purpose of familiarising himself with the requirements of Western taste, and on that occasion he succeeded in obtaining an introduction to the Queen, who received him at Windsor, and expressed herself greatly pleased with the work, and appointed Mr. Framjee a jeweller to the court. This naturally made the Empress very popular with the swami workers in Southern India, and when they heard of the coming marriage of Princess Louise of Wales, "the trade"–probably with a wise eye to business as well as loyalty–turned out a magnificent casket as a wedding present. The casket figured conspicuously in the show of presents at Marlborough House.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 2nd September 1889

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 27, 2013 3:17 pm

JB (Unknown)

Mark noted twice, firstly on an unidentified piece of scrap, and secondly on a fine one pint mug.

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SIL - Fish - J.B.

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SIL - Fish - J.B.

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 29, 2013 11:44 am

HAMILTON & Co.

7, Old Court House Street, Calcutta

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Established by Robert Hamilton in 1808, initially at 5, Tank Square, and then to 7, Old Court House Street in 1809.

Robert Hamilton served his apprenticeship at Edinburgh under William Cunningham I in the 1780's, and after becoming Free, took two apprentices himself, William Howden, the nephew of the Edinburgh silversmith, Francis Howden, in 1801, and James Donaldson in 1804, neither were to complete their term with Hamilton by mid 1807 he had determined that his future lay in India. Hamilton arrived in India in August 1808 on board the 'Preston' and immediately set up business in Tank Square, Calcutta under his own name, on the 3rd November 1808 he announced that: "he has fitted up the house No.5 Tank Square, corner of Council House Street, for carrying on the various branches of his business, as Jewellers, etc." In September 1811 his business was restyled to Hamilton & Co. following his entry into partnership with Henry Glazbrook and James Glazbrook, and although he retained an interest in the business, by December of the following year he had left Calcutta and had returned to Great Britain. By 1817 he had parted with his interest in the business and around that time acquired Bloomfield Hall at Norwood, Surrey, which was to remain his home until his death at Hove, Sussex on the 14th August 1847.

Following Robert Hamilton's departure from the business the directors of the company changed with great frequency, but the firm was successful and opened branches at Bombay and Simla. They finally closed their doors for the last time in 1973.


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Hamilton & Co. - Calcutta - 1882

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Some examples of the work of Hamilton & Co:

A mustard pot c.1930, complete with internal glass liner , the pot lid carries the crest of The Bengal Artillery AFI (Auxiliary Force India):

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A pepper pot with similar engraving:

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A Teaspoon c.1820:

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Further details of the above spoon and its history can be found at: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=17851&p=40139

See also: http://www.925-1000.com/AngloIndian_01.html

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Sun Dec 22, 2013 7:56 am

HIPPOLITUS POIGNAND

Calcutta

Example of the work of Hippolitus Poignand, a pair of teaspoons:

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Hippolitus Poignand was born in Jersey, Channel Islands, on the 29th August 1761, his parents or grandparents may have been Huguenot refugees that had fled France.

It is thought that he may have worked as a silversmith in Jersey during the 1780's and probably served an apprenticeship there or at London.

He married the aptly named Margaret Bride at Saint Martin In The Fields, Westminster, London, on the 14th July 1792, prior to setting out for a new life in Calcutta, arriving there in 1793.

As from 1798 he was known to have shared the premises of Victor Malliardet.

On the 7th January 1799 he witnessed the marriage of Francis Dormieux.

The 'star' device shown above is similar to one used by another Calcutta silversmith of this period, Joseph Rondo, who was known to have purchased the remaining stock of Hippolitus Poignand following his death.

Hippolitus Poignand died in Calcutta on the 19th May 1805. He was buried at Calcutta, the inscription on his gravestone is shown below:

Hic Sepultus Jacet HIPPOLITUS POIGNAND
Natus dic 29 Augusti, Anno Domini 1761
Obiit dic 19 Maii, 1805
Ad lemtatem quam erga uxorem,
Ad amorem quam ergoa liberos,
Ad liberalitatem quam erga socios
Ad urbanitatem quam erga omnes
Ille habuit, nihit potest accedere.
Hoc mavmor wor multum moerens.
Posuit die Junii 9 Anno Domini
1805


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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 01, 2014 1:47 pm

BAPALAL & Co.

24/1 & 37, Cathedral Road, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Established in 1910 by Bapalal Mehta and still in business today. The business later passed to his only son, Suresh Bapalal Mehta, who still runs the business along with his only daughter, Sheetal Bhat.

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 25, 2014 5:15 am

MOTILAL DAYABHAI & Co.

280, Kalbadevi Road, Bombay

Noted as an exhibitor at the Delhi Exhibition of 1902-1903.


MOTILAL DAYABHAI & CO., 280, KALBADEVI ROAD, BOMBAY

This firm besides having both wholesale and retail branches are also manufacturing jewellers and diamond merchants.

The principal articles exhibited by them in the Jewellery Court were :-

A pair of anklets [paijams) with diamonds, rubies, emeralds, and pearls valued at 81,00,000, Diamond bangles valued from R 10,000 to R20,000. Necklaces set with diamonds, rubies, and pearls at from R 10,000 to 830,000. A pair of gold cups and saucers set with diamonds, R20,000. A silver salver with an allegorical history of the Ramayana. Burmese bowls of unique design in silver. Art emerald tea service of Kashmir pattern. A pair of silver centre pieces of unique pattern.


Source: Indian Art at Delhi - Being the Official Catalogue of the Delhi Exhibition, 1902-1903 - Sir George Watt Kt., CLE., M,B, CM., etc., - 1903

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 27, 2014 11:13 am

SRI RAM JANKI DAS

Dehli

Noted as an exhibitor at the Delhi Exhibition of 1902-1903.

Sri Ram Janki Das of Dehli. - This firm have a good display of jewellery. A special feature of this work is their traffic in jade stone. They have a curious and interesting assortment of this work both ancient and modern and either simply engraved or jewelled. The following are some of their more interesting exhibits:-

A necklace of stone valued at R4,000. A necklace of pearls set with diamonds and sapphires, R1,100. An Indian jhumar (jewel for the head) set on one side with diamonds and on the other with rubies and pearls, R1,500. A seven- row necklace, R2,000. A jewelled drop necklace set with pearls, sapphires, and diamonds, R2,500. A seven diamond ring, R1,600. A jade plate with a tea cup set with diamonds, emeralds, rubies, and pearls, R6,000. A handsome aigrette fully jewelled, R7,000. An oval jade plate set with diamonds, pearls, turquoises, rubies and emeralds, R4,000.


Source: Indian Art at Delhi - Being the Official Catalogue of the Delhi Exhibition, 1902-1903 - Sir George Watt Kt., CLE., M,B, CM., etc., - 1903

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 06, 2014 2:25 pm

HUGH GORDON

Madras

Hugh Gordon, the son of James Gordon, was born at Aberdeen in c.1767. After having received his training in London, he arrived at Madras in 1792 to be reunited with his elder brother, Robert Gordon (I), and was in business on his own account in 1793. He continued in business at Madras until 1803 when, in that year, his business was passed to the firm of Gordon & Lovell (George Gordon I, Francis Lovell, and Robert Gordon II).

Hugh Gordon appears to have made his fortune in Madras, in 1804 he returned home to Aberdeen a wealthy man. He purchased an estate near Inverurie and had a new house constructed there. In 1807 he married 22 year old Elizabeth Forbes and the couple had ten children. He died in 1834 aged 68 years.

An example of the work and mark of Hugh Gordon:

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HG - Thistle

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 08, 2014 8:45 am

RAI BUDDREE DAS BAHADUR & SONS

152, Harrison Road, Calcutta

Noted as an exhibitor at the Delhi Exhibition of 1902-1903.

Rai Buddree Das Bahadur and Sons of 152, Harrison Road, Calcutta.–This firm exhibits necklaces, sirpatches, brooches, bangles, rings, etc., of pearls, rubies, emeralds, diamonds, etc. The following are some of their most prized specimens : –

The large ruby - chatterputty maneck. This is believed to be very ancient and to have been owned in turns by Hindu and Muhapimadan Kings. It is in size about 2 inches long and 1½ inches broad and is set in a sirpatch with pure Indian diamonds. The pearl necklace -the pearls in this are large, round, and well matched, the collection having taken 30 years to bring together. Three-row pearl necklace–this consists of many exceptionally fine pearls. The pearl drop necklace–these are well matched drop pearls. Green diamond–a rare and large stone called Banasputty. It is said to be very old and is described as of first water and surrounded by other small white diamonds. Diamond drop tiara–this consists of numerous old white diamond drops in the shape of grapes. The firm has also some very' large, rare, ancient, loose stones such as diamonds, sapphires, emeralds, catseyes of unusual size and weight, collected from private sources for years past.


Source: Indian Art at Delhi - Being the Official Catalogue of the Delhi Exhibition, 1902-1903 - Sir George Watt Kt., CLE., M,B, CM., etc., - 1903

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Re: Indian Colonial Silver & Indian Subcontinent Trade Info

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 12, 2014 6:44 am

ARLINGTON & Co.

The Calcutta Plated Ware and Cutlery Depot, 3, Dalhousie Square, Calcutta

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Arlington & Co. - Calcutta - 1881

Arlington & Co., the business of Edward Lindstedt, Samuel Harradan, and Charles Vaughan, was established at Calcutta, originally at 3, Tank Square, in 1855. They relocated to 3, Dalhousie Square in 1867.

Arlington & Co. were thought to have been in business up until 1959.

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