Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby dognose » Sat Jun 06, 2015 8:52 am

TAKATA & Co.

38, Mukouyanagibara Itchome, Asakusa-ku, Tokyo


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Takata & Co. - Tokyo - 1904

The above is Takata & Co.'s advertisement from the the World's Fair held at St. Louis in 1904.

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 08, 2015 1:31 pm

KINGORO EZAWA

Tokyo


Some examples of the work of Kingoro Ezawa:

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The above items were gifts presented by the Japanese foreign minister, Baron Komura Jutarō, to President Theodore Roosevelt at the meetings at Sagamore Hill which led to the Treaty of Portsmouth and the ending of the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05.

Kingoro Ezawa was the owner of the Tenshodo stores at Tokyo, Nagasaki, Yokohama, Otaru, Hiroshima, Ogawamachi, and Osaka (see above post).

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby dognose » Sat Jun 13, 2015 1:21 pm

A parcel and letter are addressed to a certain individual "care of " a silversmith, who duly pays postage. The same day an elderly man enters the shop of the silversmith and asks for the parcel and letter, which are handed over to him on the payment of a little extra postage money. Before leaving the shop, the elderly man confesses that he is unable to read, and begs as a favour the silversmith to read the letter for him. On the letter being read the package is found to be ten taels of silver, sent by a dutiful son to his father. One confidence leads to another, and the silversmith weighs the silver to see if it is the correct weight. He finds it weighs thirteen taels, and thinking to make a good deal with the simple old man, offers to change the sycee for 15 dollars, its full value without any commission for exchange on the reckoning that it were ten taels as stated in the letter. The old man gratefully accepts the offer and departs with the silver dollars. No sooner has he left the shop than another man enters and begins to speak to the silversmith of an old rogue he has just seen leaving the premises, and hopes no tricks have been played by him upon his honourable friend. The silversmith's suspicions being aroused, he proceeds at once to test the silver left by the old man, a proceeding he would never have omitted under ordinary circumstances before advancing good cash in exchange. On the usual tests being applied, the silver is found to be spurious. Amidst angry exclamations, he asks the man if he knows where the old rogue lives. After the usual Chinese hesitancy, he offers to lead him to the old man's abode on the payment of two dollars for his services. This is agreed to, and after showing the house he secures his reward and departs. A furious interview ensues between the silversmith and the elderly man, causing the neighbours to assemble. They hear the man called "thief" by the silversmith, whilst the accused plaintively asserts his innocence and offers to return the dollars if what the silversmith declares is proved to him to be true. Accompanied by a crowd the two men return to the shop, where, on arrival, the silversmith angrily hands back the silver and demands his dollars. The old man, however, denies that it is the same piece of sycee and backs up his statement by asking the silversmith to weigh it. This request cannot be refused, and the piece of silver is found to weigh thirteen taels. The old man then appeals to the sympathies of the crowd by showing his letter, in which it is explicitly stated that only ten taels have been sent. The crowd is convinced that a great injustice has been done to the grey-haired stranger by calling him thief, with the result that the silversmith not only loses his 15 dollars but is the poorer by two dollars given as a reward to the confederate of the old rogue who had posed as an informer.

Source: The Journal of the Manchester Geographical Society - 1902

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby dognose » Sun Jun 14, 2015 11:58 am

CHINESE METAL MANUFACTURES

Part one of a three part article written by H.K. Richardson that was published in 1917:

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Source: The Metal Industry - May 1917

(To be continued)

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 15, 2015 11:12 am

CHINESE METAL MANUFACTURES

Part two of a three part article written by H.K. Richardson that was published in 1917:

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Source: The Metal Industry - November 1917

(To be continued)

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 16, 2015 11:23 am

CHINESE METAL MANUFACTURES

Part three of a three part article written by H.K. Richardson that was published in 1917:

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Source: The Metal Industry - December 1917

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 17, 2015 7:51 am

THE IMPERIAL MINT AT OSAKA, JAPAN


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The city of Osaka is situated in the eastern part of central Japan and is one of the most important commercial centers in the Far East. It lies upon the banks of the Yodogawa, the river that drains Lake Biwa. A small island in the middle of the river divides it into two parts of about equal width. The city is intersected by numerous small canals which, it is often said, gives it the appearance of Holland although they have the objectionable feature of breeding disease caused, no doubt, by the imperfect drainage. The ancient name of the city of Osaka was Naniwa and those who recollect the formation of the first Japanese navy will remember that one of the most formidable and largest of the vessels in it was called by this name. Since then, other larger and more powerful vessels have outclassed it.

In population, Osaka is the second city in size in Japan and at the last census it contained a population of 996,000. The largest city is Tokio with a population of 1,819,000.

It will be appreciated, therefore, that Osaka is one of the largest cities in the world and is practically the size of Brooklyn. From a manufacturing standpoint it seems to be the most important city in Japan, and it contains copper works and rolling mills, cotton mills and many other important industries that have sprung up in the country within the past ten years during which time Japan has made such rapid industrial progress. Among the important industrial works in Osaka is the Imperial Mint in which the coinage of the country is manufactured. A photograph of the Mint is herewith shown and indicates that it is a plant of considerable magnitude and one which reflects credit upon the industry of the Japanese.

The Mint was organized in 1871 by a staff of British officials, but has been under the management of Japanese officials since 1889. In addition to the Mint proper, the plant contains a sulphuric acid works, a gold and silver refinery and parting plant. The melting at the Mint is done in graphite crucibles obtained from England, and the fuel is composed of charcoal. Otherwise the operations are about the same as those conducted in our own country. The rolling mill machinery is mainly of English make, although some of the coinage presses and other machinery was manufactured in the United States.

Photographs of Japanese plants are difficult to obtain and in many instances impossible. Fortiiications and Government works are forbidden and one who attempts to photograph them is sure of arrest if detected. Interior views of manufacturing plants are extremely difficult to obtain and are guarded even more jealously than in our own country.

For the accompaning photograph we are indebted to H. H. DeLoss of Bridgeport, Conn., who recently made a tour of Japan and inspected the Mint.


Source: The Brass World and Platers' Guide - April 1910

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby dognose » Sun Jun 21, 2015 7:40 am

CHINESE EXPORTS

Silverware Trade

The silverware industry had a good year with an estimated output of $1,200,000, of which about 30 per cent was shipped to the Straits Settlements, French Indo-China and Siam, and about 20 per cent to Europe and America. Exports for 1919 reached 23,060 pounds valued at $582,427, while for 1918 they were 31,256 pounds valued at $595,899. The quantity of silverware exported during 1913 is not available, but its value was $165,215. Comparison of this figure with values in 1919 is deceptive, a large part of the increase (expressed in United States currency) being accounted for by the phenomenal advance in price of silver rather than by actual growth in exports of silverware.


Source: Review of Industrial and Trade Conditions in Foreign Countries by American Consular Officers - U.S. Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce - 1920

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby dognose » Wed Jul 08, 2015 5:38 am

SILVER TABLEWARE TRADE

JAPAN

[From Consul General Thomas Sammons, Yokohama]

Silver-plated ware is seen only in some of the higher-class houses, and can not be said to be used at all generally throughout Japan. Most of the ware at present in use was manufactured in England. The duty on silver-plated ware etc., is as follows: Table knives, forks, spoons, etc., made of, combined or coated with precious metals, 50 per cent ad valorem; other table knives, with handles of, or combined with, ivory, mother-of-pearl, or tortoise shell, or enameled, $23.61 per 100 pieces; other, forks, $2.44 per 100 pieces; other, spoons, $18.20 per 100 pounds.


[From Consul George N. West, Kobe]

Chopsticks Used in Japan

The Japanese generally do not use silver-plated ware, the use of the hashi, or chopsticks, being universal. The only market would be found among the foreign community and a few of the wealthier Japanese, who have adopted foreign customs to some extent.

All the silverware imports come from Germany or England.There is no prejudice against American manufactures; it is merely a question of price.

Retail prices per dozen for silver-plated ware are a out as follows: Teaspoons, $4 and $4.50; table knives, silver-handle, $10 and $11; spoons, $8.50 and $7.25; table knives, celluloid handle, $4.75 and $5; table forks, $8.50 and $7.75.


CHINA

[From Consul General Samuel S. Knabenshue, Tlentsin]

The only market for silver-plated were in Tientsin or Peking would be among the foreign residents. There are about 3,000 foreigners—— men, women, and children—m Tientsin, and a much smaller number in Peking. This, of course, does not include the soldiery. The Chinese of the wealthy class do not buy much silver-plated ware. When they desire silver goods they purchase of the native silversiniths, who make their wares out of ordinary Chinese silver dollars. Many foreigners get spoons, fruit knives, etc., of the native silver; smiths because of their quaint designs.


Source: Daily Consular and Trade Reports, Part 4, Issues 231-307 - Department of Commerce and Labor, Bureau of Manufactures - 1913

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby dognose » Mon Jul 13, 2015 5:40 am

TIENTSIN-PUKOW RAILROAD

Some details regarding the silverware supplied to the Tientsin-Pukow Railroad by the International Silver Co. in 1922:

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International Silver Co. - Meriden, Conn. - 1922

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby dognose » Tue Jul 14, 2015 6:39 am

K. TOYAMA

5, Benton-Dori Itchome, Yokohama


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K. Toyama - Yokohama - 1922

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby dognose » Wed Jul 22, 2015 2:50 pm

JAPANESE CUTLERY

That American manufacturers will have to display increased energy if they expect to keep, let alone extend, their trade is revealed by the following communication that reached us recently:

American cutlery makers are finding difficulty in placing their products in those foreign markets where formerly cheap German cutlery held a monopoly. Cheap Japanese cutlery is beginning to enter the world’s markets in increasing quantities. Before the war Japanese cutlery was hardly seen outside the Japanese islands, and most of the lower grade cutlery was supplied by German firms. Since the Germans, however, have lost this market the Japanese cutlers have aspired for the former German business. Some Japanese cutlery manufactured with cheap labor is found already in the United States, but it is in the Asiatic East and the South American markets where it has found its real foothold at the present time. Of late much Japanese cutlery has entered the American Philippine Islands, where it competes sharply with cutlery made by American labor and imported from the United States.


Source: Exporters and Importers Journal - 1920

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby davidross » Fri Jul 31, 2015 1:25 am

Disambiguation of Kobayashi Silversmiths

A recent post in the Far East section has brought to light yet another Kobayashi making or marketing silver in Japan in the first half of the 20th century:

viewtopic.php?f=13&t=41706

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In this recent post, the mark is that of D. Kobayashi, who had two Clock and Jewelry Shops, both in Tokyo, one in Kyobashi, the other in Ginza 4-chome. His company's mark was the roman letter D. K. inside a diamond, and his maker's mark was in kanji. From a few items examined, one in its original box, it would appear this D. Kobayashi was active in the 1930s, but his exact dates are to be determined.

According to a newspaper article listing the most common Japanese surnames, Kobayashi numbers ninth, so the many silversmithing Kobayashis may or may not have been related. In addition to D. Kobayashi, there are already listed in these Contributors' notes a Zenbei Kobayashi and a Shoichiro Kobayashi. Shoichiro had his shop in Kyobashi, so it is not unreasonable to suppose that D. Kobayashi was his son or his disciple.

Furthermore, there were at least two more Kobayashis working in silver, one named Shoun and the other, the much celebrated Kako. Both were active in the early 20th century.

To briefly recapitulate, with very approximate dates:

D. Kobayashi (Tokyo, 1930s)
Kako Kobayashi (presumed Tokyo, 1900-1920)
Shoichiro Kobayashi (Tokyo, 1890s)
Shoun Kobayashi (place unknown, active ca 1900s-1930s)
Zenbei Kobayashi (Tokyo, 1900s)

No doubt other silversmithing Kobayashis will come to light.

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby dognose » Sat Aug 08, 2015 10:12 am

U.S. de SILVA

106, Orchard Road, Singapore


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The business of the nephews of B.P. de Silva (see above post).

Noted as retailing the products of Barker Brothers of Birmingham in 1939.

Noted as retailing the products of Adie Brothers of Birmingham in 1955.

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The death of the mother of Mr. U.S. de Silva and Mr. U.P. de Silva, proprietors of U.S. de Silva and Bros., and sister of the late B.P. de Silva, jeweller, took place in Galle, Ceylon.

The establishment of U.S. de Silva, Bros. will be closed today.


Source: The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser - 9th July 1931

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby dognose » Tue Aug 11, 2015 4:35 am

CHINESE BULLION AND SYCEE SILVER


Coined and uncoined bullion was formerly a considerable article of import into China, particularly at the commencement of the American trade, when the United States afforded no manufactures marketable at Canton, and the trade in British manufactured goods had not yet been taken up by them. To the Americans this branch of import commerce is still chiefly confined; but with them the import of bullion has very much decreased (In 1827-28, 2,640,300 dollars,—in 1833-34, 1,029,178 dollars.), and the cost of their exports is now paid, partly by the sale of British cotton and woollen manufactures, Turkey opium, metals, and other articles; and in 1833-34, about one-third, or Spanish dollars 3,656,290, by bills drawn on London. On the other hand the export of Bullion from China has of late years been carried on to a considerable extent.

The following is the amount value of silver bullion exported by the English, during the last four years:

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The exports of silver are in dollars, both Spanish and Republican, in svcee silver, in South American bar silver, and to a small extent in plata pina, previously imported from South America in ships of the United States. During the first two years of the above statements, the exports were chiefly in dollars, but during the two last years, the amount of dollar silver exported has fallen far short of that of sycee.

In London chopped or broken dollars never pass as coin, but must be melted at the mint. When assayed at London, the sycee is frequently found to contain a small admixture of gold.

At Calcutta there is a mint duty, or seignorage of two per cent.

Silver at Bombay is either sold in the bazar, at so many rupees per 100 tolas; or sent to the mint, where it is coined into rupees, after deducting 2.807 per cent, for mint duty; 100 rupees in weight of pure silver yield 108 rs. 2 qrs. 78 reas, from which must be deducted mint duty, as above, 2.807 per cent. On broken dollars there is also, in general, a charge of half per cent, for refining.

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Gold and Silver may not legally be exported from China, except in limited quantities, and in foreign metal. A large amount is, however, annually taken away, not only of broken Spanish dollars, but also of sycee silver and gold. The gold is chiefly taken in the shape of gold leaf; but sometimes also in bars and ingots. Sycee silver is the name given to the fine metal in which the receipts and payments of the government are made. The term is derived from the Chinese se-sze, literally signifying 'fine floss silk,' the more common native name is wanyin (Pronounced in the Canton dialect nam ngun ; in Fuhkeen, bun gin.). It is found in ingots of different shapes and sizes, which vary in weight from 1 to 50 taels. Fractional parts of a tael are said to be in use sometimes, but very rarely. The most common weight of the ingots is ten taels each, and their shape, that of a parallelogram, smooth and flat on the upper, but rather rough and rounded on the lower surface. South American gold and silver are also brought to China, and re-exported, but not n large quantities.

These silver ingots are the only approach to a silver coinage among the Chinese; gold leaf is also used as money in payments not under Sp. dls. 40 or 50, being both a portable medium of conveyance, and from its thinness, very secure from fraud. The average exchange is about 17 taels of silver, or about Sp. dls. 22½ per tael of gold.

The fineness of gold and silver is expressed by dividing the metal into a hundred parts called touch. Thus, if an ingot be said to be at 95 touch, it is understood to contain 5 parts of alloy, and 95 parts of pure metal. The fineness of the metals as thus expressed may be converted into English proportions by the following analogies. If gold be, for instance, at 91.66 touch, say as 100: 91.66 :: 12 : 11, the standard, and vice versa; and to convert standard silver into touch, say, as 240 : 222 : : 100 = 92.5, the touch of sterling silver.

Some further particulars respecting sycee silver will be found on a subequent page.

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The weight of the dollar is not very uniform : 866 oz. troy are often considered as equal, on an average, to 1000 dollars' weight.

The out-turn of silver at Bombay is generally a trifle more than 180 grains per tola.

Mr. Chas. Marjoribanks says, "I believe if a tael weight of dollar silver were melted down, and 6s. of English money were also melted, that they would yield nearly equal parts of pure silver, which according to that estimate, would not give the tael at more than 6s., as compared with English money."


Dollars

Dollars, though of the same weight and purity, are not received alike by the Chinese ; the difference chiefly arises from caprice, so that what is preferred in one place, is often refused in another place, unless at a discount. But the Spanish dollars, known by the name of pillar dollars, if uninjured by the Canton practice of stamping, bear every where a premium, varying from 1 to 1½ per cent, on those that are of a recent date, and often rising among merchants from the silk districts of Nanking, to 4 and even 6 per cent., on the older dollars called flowery rimmed. There are other dollars, bearing the stamp of the letter G. to denote their being coined at the Guadalajara mint, which are never received but at discount. Their inferiority has been fixed by authority of an order from the Hoppo. South American and United States dollars do not pass among the Chinese, but are taken at par by foreigners, for exportation. These are not the only differences which exist among dollars in China; false issues of them are said to be carried on to a considerable extent.

Out of the various descriptions of dollars brought into China, those of the old Spanish Government of Mexican or Granada dollars alone, are received in payment by rate or reckoned by number: of these the old and new heads of the coinages of Charles 3rd and 4th, and of Ferdinand 7th, are always preferred ; although the other coinage, which is called Cowchin, are not refused, but taken with a small discount. These coins are current in the interior of the empire, whence a great many are annually taken. The other kinds, those coined by the Republican States, are sold in the market, at either a premium or a discount, as the demand for exportation may be, many of them being of equal value with the other in India. On the return of the merchants to Nanking, Chin-chew, and the tea countries, at the end of the season, new dollars are frequently in great request, and bear in that case a premium of 3 to 5 per cent., and sometimes even more ; but this has not occurred lately.

On receiving dollars, a shroff, or man from one of the shroff shops, attends to examine them, for which he receives one tael, and sometimes two dollars per 10,000 dollars, and is responsible for their purity.

Spanish dollars from China, when entire, are of the same value as from other places, but they come in considerable quantities in a very depreciated state, with pieces chipped or punched out of them, and sometimes filled up again with lead. The weight and value of these dollars varies too much to admit of an average. The standard has been as low as 14 dwts. worse, at which rate, the price of 100 Sa. Wt. would be but 84 rupees, 10 annas, and of as many of them as would make up 100 dollars, at the usual weight, Rupees 195. 10 As.; but the only accurate mode of appreciating their value is by fusing and running them into bars, in which state alone they are receivable at the mint.—Wilson.


Sycee Silver

There are several descriptions of Sycee. The Hoppo Sycee is that in which the Hong merchant pays the duties arising from the foreign trade. That denominated the Salt, is what the duties on that article are discharged with. The salt forms one of the highest blanches of commerce in Canton; and the Mandarin presiding over it is an officer of great importance.

The land tax and every description of revenue arising from husbandry is levied in another kind of Sycee, termed Tanfoo ; and with this the military, the Mandarins, and all the emperor's servants are paid. It is considered to be of the first purity; and ought to be at nearly 100 touch; but is seldom supposed to arrive beyond that of 99. It is rarely brought into the market.

There is also another sort, brought from Nanking and Chin-chew, in pieces of 50 taels each; but all of them are exported and found in the bazars of India.

Sycee, called in Chinese Man-gan, is a species of silver containing a very small proportion of alloy; it is cast in ingots or masses of varous sizes and weights, from four or five taels, to lumps of forty or fifty, bearing the mark of a seal or stamp upon the upper surface, impressed while the metal is cooling or with a steel stamp. Many frauds are committed in the silver trade, such as imbedded fragments of iron or copper in the melted metal, over which it cools, and conceals the deception; it is also adulterated in various ways; to detect which, a Chinese Kanyin, or money-changer (called shroff by Europeans), is employed, as well as in the examination of dollars and gold, in which they are very expert.

The refined silver, which is known by the name of Sycee, comes from China in two states, large and small oval lumps, compared not unaptly by the natives, to the hoof of a horse or an elephant, and termed by them ghora khuri and hati khuri. In general they are of high standard, although far from pure; the small lumps are about 14 dwts., better; and the large 15 dwts., better than Calcutta standard. The mint produce of 100 Sicca Wt. of the former is Rupees 97 and 9 Annas, and of the latter 98 Rupees. Occasionally, however, the standard value is much lower, and 9, 10, and 12 dwts. better occur. It sometimes happens also, that the centre is found filled with base metal, and it is necessary to cut them through before they are received for coinage.— Wilson.

The following results of remittances in Sycee, may afford some idea of the relative value of the tael at the English and Indian mints.

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Sycee Silver, exported from Canton in the British trade, in the following years:

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It appears that the export of Sycee has latterly considerably increased.


Frauds In Sycee At China

At Calcutta, in August, 1834, a case came to light, which shews the extreme caution which should be observed by traders to the ports of China, now that the influence of the Company's factory is removed. A native bullion merchant purchased a lot of Sycee silver, imported per 'Sylph', from one of the most respectable merchants of Calcutta, which on being carried to the mint, was found to be entirely false metal. There were 90 pieces of what is called ghora khuri, or horse-hoofed Sycee silver, weighing about 3,000 tolas or Sicca Weight. The lumps were composed of a mixture of tin and lead, plated over with mercury and silver leaf, formed precisely like the Sycee lumps, and stamped with the usual Chinese chhaps or stamps.

This imitation silver was remitted to Calcutta by a Portuguese merchant of Macao, who had doubtless been defrauded by some skilful rogues of the celestial empire, who thus attempted to turn tin into a more precious metal. The sellers, Messrs. Thomas De Souza and Company, immediately agreed to receive back the parcel.

Upon examination of the Tin Sycee alluded to above, "the metal was found to be nothing but tin, with a small percentage of lead; except that the lumps had been washed with silver, and their form and weight (not the specific gravity) were made to correspond very closely with Sycee. As the export of silver is against the laws of the celestial empire, and moreover, the remittance was for opium, a prohibited article; there can be no redress for the fraud in any court in China. Frauds of a like nature in bullion remittances from China are by no means uncommon; one of great magnitude occurred many years ago, by which the house of James Scott and Co. lost considerably more than a lac of rupees."—Calcutta Courier, Aug. 1834.


Source: A Practical Treatise on the China and Eastern Trade: Comprising the Commerce of Great-Britain and India Particularly Bengal and Singapore with China and the Eastern Islands - John Phipps - 1836

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 04, 2015 9:35 am

Fire broke out in a silver-smith's shop at Kawa se Kokucho, Nihonbashi-ku, Tokyo. at 12.15 am on the 19th inst. Six houses were destroyed and eight damaged. The fire started in a kitchen.

Source: The Japan Daily Mail - 22nd September 1900

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 04, 2015 10:59 am

SHENG YUAN (SHENG YUEN)

Peking

An example of the mark of Sheng Yuan:

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Member FTJJ wrote: The Chinese characters are "聲元 Sheng Yuan" "足紋 pure silver".

Sheng Yuan's working period is thought to be 1885-1940.

Confusingly, there were two silversmiths named Sheng Yuan (see below post) operating in Peking at this time, with apparently no connection with one another.

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 04, 2015 11:13 am

SHENG YUAN (SHENG YUAN LOU - PEKING SILVER TEMPLE)

4, Silver Street, Peking and 349, Yates Road, Shanghai


Sheng Yuan's working period is thought to be 1885-1940. The firm's manager was noted as Mr. C.C. Wong.

Besides the chop-marks, items noted are marked 'CHINA SHENGYUAN STERLING' or CHINA PEKING STERLING'.

Confusingly, there were two silversmiths named Sheng Yuan (see above post) operating in Peking at this time, with apparently no connection with one another.

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby dognose » Thu Sep 17, 2015 7:49 am

KRUSE & Co.

10, Queen's Road Central, Hong Kong


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Kruse & Co. - Hong Kong - 1874

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Kruse & Co. - Hong Kong - 1904


Foreign Residents

Longuet, C. W., assistant, Kruse & Co., Hongkong


Source: The Directory & Chronicle of China, Japan, Straits Settlements, Malaya, Borneo, Siam, the Philippines, Korea, Indo-China, Netherlands Indies, Etc. - 1892


Foreign Residents

Soares, P. P., clerk, Kruse & Co., Hongkong


Source: The Directory & Chronicle for China, Japan, Corea, Indo-China, Straits Settlements, Malay States, Sian, Netherlands India, Borneo, the Philippines, &c - 1907


KRUSE & CO.

It was in 1868 that Mr. Kruse, a shrewd man of business, laid the foundation of the extensive import trade in tobacco, cigars, and fancy goods now carried on under the style of Kruse & Co. by Messrs. C. W. Longuet and J. Meier. Mr. Kruse died in 1874, and many changes of partnership followed, but the business has prospered, and to-day the firm is the leading house of its kind in the Colony, with a carefully guarded reputation for supplying only the best class of goods. Messrs. Kruse & Co. are agents for Messrs. Valfiadis & Co.'s and Messrs. A. G. Cousis & Co.'s Egyptian cigarettes; they are the sole importers of the "Imperia dei Mundo" Manila cigars ; they import the special brand known as "El Oriente" direct from the factory ; and they are the only firm shipping cigars direct from Havana in wholesale quantities to Hongkong. They deal both with the Tobacco Trust and with independent companies, and are thus able to meet the requirements of all customers. Smokers' requisites of every kind are stocked in abundance. The house has taken the lead in other directions, too, for it is the only one importing continental fancy goods, including china, table and wall ornaments, fancy baskets, glass vases, and ware of special design, &c. Other lines comprise electro-plate, toys, picture postcards (which latter the firm were the first to introduce into the Colony), and the well-known " Divinice " brand of perfume, distilled by Messrs. Wolff & Sohn. The firm also deal largely in incandescent gas fittings, and were the first local agents for the "Welsbach" burners now in general use. This does not by any means exhaust the list of agencies held by the firm - for they represent the "Columbia" Cycle Company, the German newspaper, Ostasiatische Lloyd, and numerous smaller interests—but enough has been said to show the extent and diversity of the trade carried on by them. The proprietors visit Europe in turn, one buying goods in Hamburg whilst the other is supervising the business in Hongkong.


Source: Twentieth century impressions of Hongkong, Shanghai, and other treaty ports of China - Arnold Wright - 1908

Trev.

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Re: Chinese Export Silver & Far East Trade Information

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 25, 2015 2:50 pm

CHAN FAT (A.I. HALL & SON)

San Francisco


Chan Fat, Chinese salesman for A. I. Hall & Son, has just returned from an extended trip to Yokohama, Shanghai, Hong Kong and Canton. In all he traveled 15,500 miles and is stated to have accomplished a number of things during his absence, of even more importance than mileage.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 12th July 1922

A.I. Hall & Son were a manufacturers' agents and wholesale jewelers established in 1879 at San Francisco.

Trev.


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