Those Working in Ireland From the Mid 19th and 20th Century

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 03, 2013 4:55 pm

JAMES CARR

80, Capel Street, Dublin

James Carr, Watchmaker, 80, Capel Street, Dublin. Watchmaking, owing to foreign competition, has become one of the most flourishing industries in our city, and has achieved a prominent position among other branches of trade. In this connection a noted firm is that of James Carr, of 80, Capel Street. This gentleman has, solely by the exercise of his own personal activity, secured a connection of no inconsiderable extent, and there is now no house so widely known for exact workmanship and punctuality in transactions as this enterprising firm. A large business is done in jewellery working and repairing, which, owing to the skill of Mr. Carr, is in a most flourishing and prosperous state. This establishment is noted for the durable and efficient manner in which all repairs are executed, and the good workmanship displayed in every detail has secured for Mr. Carr a connection of a considerable value. This gentleman has been in business for the last nine years, during which time he has, by paying strict attention to the wishes of his patrons, placed himself on a secure footing in this populous city, and his, by his untiring industry, made for himself a widespread and influential business.

Source: Industries of Dublin - 1887

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Sat Jan 05, 2013 3:35 pm

WILLIAM EGAN AND SONS

32 & 33, Patrick Street, Cork

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WILLIAM EGAN AND SONS, Watchmakers, Diamond Merchants, and Ecclesiastical Furnishers, 32 & 33, Patrick Street, Cork.
One of the most attractive establishments in the leading business thoroughfare of Cork is that conducted by Egan and Sons, who carry on at the above address two separate and distinct businesses, each of which has secured for the firm an eminence not merely throughout Ireland but in all parts of the civilized world. The business is an old established one, having been in existence for more than a century, during which period it has passed from father to son, each succeeding possessor adding fresh renown to the already honourable traditions of the house. The premises occupied by Egan And Sons comprise two magnificent adjoining shops–the one, No. 32, being devoted to high-class art jewellery, gold and silversmith's work, and watchmaking; the other being occupied in connection with the hardly less artistic business of ecclesiastical furnishing, vestment manufacture, and embroideries, appointments, and sacred utensils of every description. The two shops have excellent frontages, the windows affording every accommodation for the display of the magnificent stocks. The shops are lighted by electricity from dynamo and storage battery power, supplied by a 6-horse power gas engine on their premises, which is also used for the silver-plating factory, where old articles are done up as new, such as cruets, teapots, etc., etc.; and bicycling and car irons are nickel-plated, and all kinds of Bizantine goods for altar and otherwise are lacquered. This is the only factory of its kind in the South of Ireland, and has only recently been added to their business. As evidence of the work turned out by the establishment, we may mention a silver model of the world-renowned Shandon Church made expressly for the Cork Exhibition, 1883, and exhibited at the New Orleans Exhibition, where it attracted universal attention. This church has been made famous by Father Prout's immortal poem– "Pells of Shandon, Loud, so grand on."
In the jewellery department the stock consists of ladies' and gentlemen's gold and silver watches of every description and an elegant assortment of gold and silverplated goods, including a large variety of standard silver waiters, trays, fish and fruit knives and forks, cock-up spirit frames, revolving-cover dishes, carvers, saltcellars, cruets, entree dishes, etc., of the newest patterns, both plain and exquisitely chased, engraved, and embossed. There is also a splendid assortment of jewellery, comprising brooches, bracelets, chains, diamond crescents, and stars for the hair; dress and other rings composed of pearls, rubies, emeralds, diamonds, sapphires, opals, and other gems. The stock of diamonds is especially extensive, and probably no house in Ireland at the present day will compare with this in the value and variety of these precious stones at all times kept on hand.

The interior of the establishment is fitted with appointments of a most superior description, and the goods are arranged for inspection with conspicuous taste and judgement. Articles specially suited for wedding, birthday, and complimentary gifts, as well as presentation and prize plate, form a very prominent and attractive feature of the stock, special attention being directed to this important branch of the business. The repairing department supplies one more significant detail, skilled and competent workmen being retained for the execution of repairs in watches, plate, and jewellery and the rearranging and re-mounting of gem ornaments of every description.

Turning next our attention to the adjoining premises, we find them spacious and commodious, extending a long way to rearward, and specially arranged as a showroom for ecclesiastical requirements. All the fittings and appointments of the place are of a superior and elegant character and display to great advantage the large and exquisitely beautiful stock embracing embroideries of every description for ecclesiastical purposes. Among the many artistic productions in ecclesiastical needlework turned out at this establishment may be mentioned embroidered altar-covers, stoles, bookmarkers, silk chalice veils, burses, tabernacle curtains, banners, copes, chasubles, surplices, albs, silk and other cinctures, birettas, dalmatics, etc., etc., while in the department of church and altar furniture will be found a most complete assortment of ciboriums, remonstrances, pyxes, lamps, candlesticks, cruets, missal stands, altar crosses, processional crosses, vases, gongs, statues, stations of the cross, oleographs, altar cards, fringes, registers, rosaries, medals, and a hundred other items appertaining to the business. Messrs. Egan And Sons have conferred a lasting service on the Roman Catholic Church by the invention of a new " safety custos," which quite supersedes the form of lunette generally used in the Benediction of the Most Holy Sacrament. So easy is it with the "safety custos " to fix the Sacred Host in the Monstrance, and replace the Blessed Sacrament after Benediction, that a nervous or infirm priest could easily perform the act without risk of irreverence or accident.
The firm's connection extends over the whole of Ireland and the United States, a representative being constantly employed in the latter country. Altogether a very large business is done, and Messrs. Egan And Sons enjoy the support and patronage of a most influential connection among just that class who know how to properly estimate superior quality, artistic merit, and moderate price in a class of productions where there is but too much ground for believing that buyers are, by less scrupulous firms, sadly taken advantage of.


Source: Dublin, Cork, and South of Ireland: A Literary, Commercial, and Social Review - 1892

An example of the work of William Egan & Sons, a wafer box, assayed at Dublin in 1940:

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DONNELLY V. EGAN & SON, LIMITED

Before the Vice-Chancellor at Dublin last week, Dr. Donnelly, of 14, Rutland Square, Cork, sought an injunction to restrain defendants, who are jewellers, carrying on business at 32, Patrick Street, Cork, and their servants from keeping, working, or using a large dynamo, gas engine, and electric plant and machinery, on certain premises in Elbow Lane, Cork, at the rear of the defendants establishment to the injury of the plaintiff's adjoining premises. Mr Ignatius J. O'Brian, with whom was Mr Stephen Rowan, Q.C. (instructed by Messrs. John L. Scallan and Son), moved on behalf of the plaintiff for an ad interim injunction to prohibit the use of the machinery pending the hearing of this action, relying on an affidavit of plaintiff stating the injury the vibration of the machinery was causing plaintiff's premises, and that defendants had specially covenanted by the lease under which they held the premises in Elbow Lane not to use machinery therein to the annoyance of their neighbours. Mr George Wright, Q.C., on behalf of the defendants, stated that he could not resist the motion, but it should be limited to the large engine and machinery recently placed on the premises, and the action not be further proceeded with. Mr O'Brian consenting, the Vice-Chancellor made an order accordingly, and directed defendants to pay all plaintiff's costs to date.

Source: The Electrical Review - 22nd July 1898



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Wm. Egan & Sons - Cork - 1875

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Wm. Egan & Sons - Cork - 1903

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William Egan & Sons - Cork - 1907

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Wm. Egan & Sons - Cork - 1907

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Wm. Egan & Sons - Cork - 1910

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Wm. Egan & Sons - Cork - 1913

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Wm. Egan & Sons - Cork - 1918

The above advertisement is not without note, for it illustrates perhaps the most important piece of silver ever to have made in Cork. The ceremonial mace for the newly created University College, Cork was commissioned by the President of the College, Sir Bertram Windle in 1910. In granting the commission to William Egan & Sons, Sir Bertram had a major stipulation, he insisted that the mace had to be made in Cork. As virtually no silver of any note had been produced at Cork since the later part of the first half of the nineteenth century, Barry Egan Snr. and Barry Egan Jnr., who were running William Egan & Sons at that time, had to recruit skilled silversmiths from Dublin to perform the task, they also took the opportunity to introduce an apprenticeship scheme enrolling boys from the North Monastery and ensuring that they also attended drawing classes in the Crawford School of Art. The mace was to prove to be the catalyst for the re-establishment of the craft of the silversmith in Cork, without it we would not see pieces such as the alter plate in the Honan Chapel that was made in the 1915-1916 period or that of the famed items from the 'Cork Republican Silver' period in 1922.


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Wm. Egan & Sons - Cork - 1920

An image of a billhead issued by William Egan & Sons can be found at: viewtopic.php?f=75&t=31474

The Egan family was connected with the silversmithing trade as from the 1700's. The firm of William Egan & Sons was founded in the early 1820s, they finally closed their doors for the last time in 1986.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 08, 2013 3:40 pm

GEORGE GATES

6, East Beach, Queenstown


GEORGE GATES, Practical Watchmaker and Jeweller, 6, East Beach, Queenstown. One of the most attractive features in this favourite promenade is the well-known establishment of Mr. George Gates, Practical Watchmaker and Jeweller, whose effectively arranged window is a constant source of interest to visitors to the district. This prosperous business was established in 1877, at 19, West Beach, by the present proprietor, from whence it was subsequently removed to the more central and convenient site now occupied by this gentleman at 6, East Beach. The premises comprise handsome and commodious shop, with good window frontage, which is fully utilised for the display of the valuable assortment of goods submitted for inspection. The interior is beautifully appointed with elegant show cases and other fittings in recherche style for exhibiting to advantage the costly and beautiful stock. This includes ladies' and gentlemen's gold and silver watches and chains; gem, guinea gold wedding, dress, keeper, and mourning rings; brooches, pins, bracelets; Irish marble jewellery; and an immense variety of fancy and ornamental articles suitable for presents, &c. Special attention is directed by Mr. Gates to the repairing department, for which a well-lighted workroom is provided for all kinds of watch and jewellery repairs, which are completed with the utmost promptitude on the shortest notice by the proprietor. Another prominent feature of the business is the manufacture to order of artistically designed badges and prizes for regattas and other aquatic sports, for which Mr. Gates has long enjoyed a high reputation, and has been honoured with the patronage of the leading rowing and yachting clubs in the South of Ireland. An extensive and influential connection has been established by the proprietor, which embraces the principal resident nobility and gentry in Queenstown and the vicinity and many of the numerous American and other visitors to the district. In addition, Mr. Gates has for the past ten years enjoyed the sole monopoly of the Government work in Queenstown in the execution of repairs, &c., for the Admiralty and War Office authorities, and has successfully cultivated a very sound and substantial all-round business.

Source: Dublin, Cork, and South of Ireland: A Literary, Commercial, and Social Review - 1892

George Gates was recorded in the Irish Census of 1911 as a 66 year old Watchmaker and Jeweller, born in Brighton, married to Sara, who was 50 years old and born at Great Younger. They had been married for 32 years, lived at 6, East Beach, Queenstown, and their religion noted at Church of Ireland.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 09, 2013 8:18 am

JAMES FRANCIS O'CROWLEY

89, George's Street, Cork

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The mark of James Francis O'Crowley noted on a teaspoon assayed at Dublin. The date letter 'V' was the first letter to used at Dublin since the abolition of the duty on gold and silver, it was in use from the 23rd June 1891 until the introduction of the date letter 'W' which occurred on the 20th August 1892.

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The mark at the top of the handle is an unofficial mark representing the Arms of the City of Cork, a ship between two castles.



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J.F. O'Crowley - Cork - 1883

Near the base of the above advertisement from James Francis O'Crowley, is mention of 'The Lane Testimonial', below are the details of this huge work, weighing 200 ounces and standing 36 inches in height and 30 inches in breadth.


THE LANE TESTIMONIAL

Mr. James F. O'Crowley, 89, Old George's Street, Cork.


Every Irish dealer in precious metals is a watchmaker and manufacturing jeweller, " if," in the words of the " Grand Duchess," "his own words may be believed;" but, unfortunately for the welfare of the country, and the general good faith of the craft, many of them are in hard fact the makers of nothing except, perhaps, unfounded statements. Mr. O'Crowley is the exception which proves the rule for, since the establishment of his workshops in 1878, he has been the bona fide manufacturer of brooches, ear-rings, bracelets, chains, lockets, epergnes, and almost every article of gold and silver jewellery. The exhibit of this truly Irish manufacturer is composed for the lesser part of the articles already enumerated, but the great object at his well-stocked stall is the Lane Testimonial. This superb ornaments has been presented to Mr. William J. Lane, T.C., of North Mall, Cork, for his efforts on behalf of Irish manufacture. Never was reward more honestly and gallantly won, and the history of his great services to the Country have, indeed, been all too poorly rewarded. On the 19th August, 1881, Mr. Lane first proposed the holding of a National Exhibition as the best and surest means by which the sinking industries of the country might be revived and developed. Through the stormy months that followed his name was but little heard; but, at the never to be forgotten meeting held on the 22nd December, 1881, in Dublin, when the abandonment of the Exhibition was decided upon on purely political grounds, his manly protest and vote were recorded against this suicidal measure. A few weeks later a meeting was convened at the Dublin Mansion House for the revival of the Exhibition movement, and at this meeting Mr. Lane brought forward the resolution recommending the holding of the Exhibition, and the formation of a Company for that purpose. Through the weary days that succeeded Mr. Lane stood gallantly by the side of the faithful few with whom he was associated, and to his energetic action and sleepless industry is due the success of the undertaking, and the great place occupied by the City and County of Cork in its record. The Testimonial which Mr. O'Crowley exhibits has been purchased by the subscriptions of Irishmen of every creed and class, and, beautiful though it be, it falls far short in its recognition of the invaluable services rendered by this patriotic and high-minded gentleman. The proposed Testimonial was submitted to the Testimonial Committee in the form of a rough sketch furnished by Mr. O'Crowley, and this was, when approved, worked into an elegant design by Miss Caroline Beatson, of the Cork School of Art. The Testimonial is in the form of an epergne, surmounted by four cut glass basins, which are supported on a trailing vine, luxuriant with fruit and ample foliage, emblematic of prosperity and happiness. At the base the typical figure of Erin bends over a strung harp, with the wolf-dog at her side. The details of these figures are worked out with marvellous grace and finish, the harp being an exact model of Brian Boru's Harp, as shown in the Museum of Trinity College, Dublin. The piece is 36 inches in height, and 30 inches in breadth, while the figure at foot measures 6 inches, and the entire silver work of the Testimonial weighs 200 ounces. The vine and figures stand upon a hexagonal ebonised stand, the sides of which are decorated with silver plates, with allegorical representations of art, industry, etc. On the front panel the following inscription appears ;–


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The artistic style of this fine piece of plate will best be estimated by actual examination; the most minute attention has been given to every portion of the details, the twining of the tendrils, the rough surfacing of the leaves, the graining of the bark upon the vine stem, are all evidence of the most careful workmanship, consummate skill, and true taste and culture. We congratulate the Committee and subscribers on having found such an object for their admiration as Mr. Lane, and we felicitate every one concerned in having enlisted in the enterprise so much talent and skill as Mr. O'Crowley has displayed.

Source: Illustrated Guide to the Cork International Exhibition - H C. Hartnell - 1883


James Francis O'Crowley of 89, George's Street, Cork, is listed in the 'Retail Optician' 'Retail Silversmith' 'Electro Plater & Gilder' and 'Artist in Hair' sections of 'Kelly's Directory of the Watch & Clock Trades 1880'.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 09, 2013 11:18 am

R. LAWLESS

5, Earl Street, Dundalk

R. LAWLESS, Watchmaker and Jeweller, 5, Earl Street, Dundalk. The leading house in this important trade in the town of Dundalk is the attractive establishment conducted under the style of Mr. R. Lawless, Watchmaker and Jeweller, 5, Earl Street, to which we have pleasure in directing the attention of our readers. The business was originally established forty years ago by Mr. R. Lawless, who was subsequently succeeded in the control by his nephew, Mr. John Lawless, the present sole proprietor, who however continues the trade under the title so long associated with the house. The premises in Earl Street comprise very commodious double-fronted shop of handsome proportions, beautifully fitted throughout with appointments in recherche taste, providing effective facilities for displaying the large and attractive selection of goods submitted for inspection in the several departments of the establishment. The leading features of his stock include a wide range of costly and artistically designed dining and drawing room clocks in elegant cases, gold and silver watches, silver and electroplated goods for the table, etc., valuable gold and gem jewellery in new and fashionable designs, and a great variety of useful and ornamental articles suitable for prizes, presents, etc. Special attention is directed by the proprietor to the execution of all kinds of repairing work in watches, clocks, jewellery, etc., for which the services of competent and trustworthy hands only are employed. An extensive and valuable clientele has been established by the proprietor and his predecessor, which embraces the principal nobility and gentry throughout the counties adjacent, and the liberal and well-sustained support of the leading citizens in this flourishing seaport town.

Source: Dublin, Cork, and South of Ireland: A Literary, Commercial, and Social Review - 1892


John Richard Lawless was recorded in the Irish Census of 1911 as being a 50 year old Jeweller born in Dublin City, he was married to Mary Elizabeth, aged 38 years, who was born in Dundalk, Co. Louth. They had been married for 16 years , were Roman Catholics, and resided at 12, Earl Street, Dundalk.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 10, 2013 11:43 am

ALBERT & CO.

106, West Street, Drogheda

ALBERT & CO., Watchmakers and Jewellers, Stationers and Booksellers, and Tobacconists, 106 and 116, West Street, Drogheda. For upwards of half a century past the business now conducted under the style of Messrs. Albert And Co., Watchmakers and Jewellers, Stationers and Booksellers, etc., has been justly considered one of the leading houses in this department of commercial activity in the City of Drogheda. Originally founded by Mr. Thomas North, and afterwards carried on by Messrs. Hamilton and Co., the undertaking was transferred to the present proprietors, Messrs. R. Albert and Paul and Joseph Rombach (trading as Messrs. Albert And Co.) in 1875. The premises occupied by the firm are centrally situated at 106, West Street, and consist of a large double shop, one side of which forms an elegantly appointed Jeweller's and Watchmaker's establishment and the other the Book-selling and Stationery departments. Each branch of the trade is well represented in a large and comprehensive display of high-class watches and clocks, new and fashionable jewellery, spectacles, eyeglasses, field glasses, telescopes, and a great variety of useful and ornamental articles suitable for presents, etc.; and books, stationery, and fancy goods. Their tobacconist business is carried on at 116, West Street, the shop being compact, well fitted, and fully stocked with cigars, cigarettes, and tobaccos of all the leading brands. Briar and meerschaum pipes, cigar and cigarette cases and holders, with all the other requisites for smokers, are shown in variety. A first-class trade is done by the firm, whose establishment, from its comprehensive character, is widely patronised by all classes of the general public in the City and the suburban districts.

Source: Dublin, Cork, and South of Ireland: A Literary, Commercial, and Social Review - 1892

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 11, 2013 11:44 am

THEODORE HAKENJOS

82, Barrack Street, Dundalk

ARMED MEN HOAX JEWELLER

An extraordinary episode is reported from Dundalk, in County Louth. A jeweller named Hakenjos was awakened at midnight by six armed men, who said they had been sent by the Dublin Castle authorities to search his house and business premises for arms. Hakenjos, not doubting their bona fides, showed the men over his house. The leader then said that Hakenjos must accompany them to his shop. Here Hakenjos opened the safe. The leader congratulated him on the fact that no arms had been discovered, but said he would inspect the basement while the jewels were being replaced. Finally, apologising profusely, the men left Hakenjos, who only found in the morning that he had been robbed of every valuable by the men who had visited him with a bogus warrant.


Source: Auckland Star - 19th January 1921

Theodore Hakenjos was born around 1859 in Germany, and like many of his contemporaries, brought his skills as a Watchmaker to Ireland in the second half of the 19th century. the 1901 census shows him as a 42 year old Watchmaker living at 82, Barrack Street, Dundalk, with his Irish born wife, Bertha, two children and two servants. He was a member of the Church of Ireland.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Sat Jan 12, 2013 2:49 pm

CLARENDON BROTHERS

94, Lower George's Street, Kingstown, (Dunlaoghaire)

Clarendon Bros., Jewellers and Photographers, 94, Lower George's Street, Kingstown.–The jewellery forms a branch of trade of more than ordinary importance, and has the reputation of being a prosperous one in this fasnionable locality. An old establishment of its class is that of Messrs. Clarendon Bros., situated at No. 94, Lower George's Street. It has an existence of half a century of uninterrupted progress to place on record, having been founded at so remote a date as the year 1838. It has evidently passed under the hands of several proprietors during that time. The old prestige is not only well sustained, but the premises have been considerably enlarged, the business extended in its operations, and a new branch, that of photography, added. The shop is elegantly fitted up, and well stocked with a valuable assortment of jewellery, presenting a most attractive appearance. The stock comprises in variety a splendid array of ladies' and gentlemen's gold and silver watches, chains, seals, lockets, gold and silver pins, and brooches, earrings, bracelets, necklets, etc., and a great variety of miscellaneous jewellery; English and American clocks in all designs, and at prices to suit every class. All these are the production of celebrated manufacturing firms both at home and abroad, and purchased on best terms to meet a competitive market. 'The firm do a most extensive business in the various items enumerated. They have acquired a widely spread connection trade amongst several classes of the local and rural community, and the "old house " is still most deservedly popular and highly reputed with the general public. In the photographic department they are largely patronised by all classes, and their artistic work merits thorough appreciation for its beauty and perfection. Moderation in prices is invariably found to prevail. Skilled artists are employed. The concern is under the special supervision of the principals, of undoubted qualifications, and who occupy a high place in the estimation of their numerous patrons.

Source: Industries of Dublin - 1887


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Lower George's Street, Kingstown in c.1905. (P.J.Hand, on the left of the image, was recorded as being located at No. 90.)

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 14, 2013 11:28 am

ANDREW HEINE

8, Barronstrand Street, Waterford

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Andrew Heine - Waterford - 1893

Andrew Heine came from Eisenbach in the Black Forest region of Germany, he was one of many German jewellers who established jewellery and watchmaking businesses in Ireland during the second half of the 19th century, including the Ganter’s in Dublin, the Faller’s in Galway and Londonderry, the Wehrle’s in Sligo, the Maurer’s in Limerick and Ennis, the Hilser’s in Cork, the Hakenjos's in Dundalk, and the Duffner's in Tipperary. Two other German’s also established jeweller shops in Waterford at this time, they were the Tritschler’s and the Hogg’s. Andrew Heine also settled in Waterford and opened his shop at 8, Barronstrand Street in 1878. He married Kate Kent, an Irish woman from Great Island, Co.Wexford. He died in 1903 at the age of 44 years.

Following the death of Andrew Heine the business passed to his two sons, Thomas and Alexander. Alexander married Nora Barry. The business became a limited liability company in 1954, styled, T. & A. Heine Ltd.. Thomas died in 1963, aged 81, Alexander died in 1974, aged 83. Following the death of Alexander, his only son Thomas Heine Jnr. was appointed Chairman of the company. Thomas Jnr. had been employed with the family business straight from school when he was 17 years old in 1942. Tom Heine was educated at St. Declan’s De La Salle School and St. Patrick’s De La Salle School, Newtown. In 1955 Tom Heine married Mary Whyte, they had two children, Anne and Gerard. Tom Heine was a founder member of the Retail Jeweller’s of Ireland (RJI), and served the presidency of that organization from 1973-1974.

The business closed on Friday, 31st May 2007 after a period of 129 years in business at the same premises.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 15, 2013 3:03 pm

CHARLES PEARE

6, St. Michael Street, Tipperary

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Charles Peare - Tipperary - 1889

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 15, 2013 3:05 pm

WILLIAM PEARE

31, Main Street, Carrick-on-Suir

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William Peare - Carrick-on-Suir - 1889

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 18, 2013 3:10 pm

WILLIAM JAMES McBRIDE

Bridge Street, Ballymena

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McBride - Ballymena - 1923

William James McBride was recorded in the 1901 Irish census as being a 31 year old Watchmaker, born in Ballymena, living with his brother and sister at 9, Fountain Place, Ballymena. He was unmarried and his religion recorded as Presbyterian.

The 1911 Irish census records him as a 40 year old Jeweller living as a boarder at 40, Castle Street, Ballymena. He is still unmarried, and still a Presbyterian.

William James McBride, Jeweller, Ballymena, died on the 25th May 1953, in his 84th year.

William McBride may perhaps be identified with a 'John McBride' who was recorded as a Watchmaker, located at Castle Street, Ballymena in Pigot & Co's Provincial Directory of Ireland 1824.

Details of a receipt issued by William McBride can be found at: McBride - Ballymena - Receipt - 1923

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 21, 2013 11:03 am

ADRIAN FOOTWENGLER

9, Aungier Street, Dublin

Adrian Footwengler was another of the German born watchmakers and jewellers that set up business in Ireland during the second half of the 19th century. It is likely that he firstly settled in Galway, perhaps working for Stephen Faller (see above post) who had set up business there in 1879, as his eldest daughter, Marie, was recorded as being born there around 1894. His second eldest, his son, Joseph, was born in Dublin around 1895, and those dates perhaps indicate the actual time that Adrian established his business.

Adrian Footwengler appears in the 1901 Irish census as a 44 year old watchmaker living at 9, Aungier Street, Dublin, born in Germany, living with his German born wife, Dominiska, who was aged 37 years, and their four children, Maria C. aged 7 years, Joseph P. aged 6 years, Annie D. aged 5 years, and Bertha J. aged 3 years, and one servant. The family were Roman Catholics. In this census it states that all of the children were born in Dublin.

The 1911 census reveals Adrian Footwengler as a 56 year old jeweller, still at 9, Aungier Street, Dublin, living with his 47 year old wife, Domincia (anglicized?), and seven children, Marie 18, Joseph 17, Annie 16, Bertha 14, Edward 10, Rose 6, and William 3 years of age. In this census, where the entry is to be put for the place of birth, Marie's details state Galway, it would appear that the entrant, presumablely Adrian, started to write Dublin but crossed it out and wrote Galway. As well as Adrian describing himself as a jeweller, Joseph is described as a watchmaker, and Marie as a Jeweller shop assistant.

The only other record found so far for this family is the Baptismal details for Bertha Josephine Footwengler. She was Baptised on the 16th August 1897 at Saints Michael and John Church at Dublin. The extra details revealed is that Dominiska's maiden name was Dorer, and that one of the Godparents was Josephine Hilser, who, no doubt, would have been the same Josephine Hilser who was married to the German born Cork jeweller, Richard Hilser, of Hilser Brothers. The address recorded was 9, Aungier Street.

The business was later acquired by the watchmaker, George Greene, who restyled the name to 'Greenes Jewellers' and it is with his family that the business remains today and still at the same address. George passed control to his daughter Stella, and her husband Phil Ryan. The firm is now in the hands of George's grandsons, Karl and Phillip Ryan.

Trev.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 22, 2013 1:06 pm

WILLIAM HORNICK

31, Main Street, Carrick-on-Suir

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William Hornick - Carrick-on-Suir - 1895

William Hornick was recorded in the Irish Census of 1911 as a 52 year old Master Watchmaker, born in Waterford City. He was married to Margaret, who was 46 years old and born in Waterford. They were living with their five children, Frances 23, Mary 22, Jane 21, John 18, and William 13 years, at 23, Main Street, Carrick-on-Suir. They had been married for 24 years, had seven children, of whom five were living. Their religion was noted as Church of Ireland.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 23, 2013 6:43 am

J.J. BARBER

Patrick Street, Fermoy

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J.J. Barber - Fermoy - 1875

This would be John Joseph Barber. In the Irish Census of 1901 he appears as a 50 year old Watchmaker and Jeweller, born in Dublin, married to 46 year old Hannah who was born at Kings Co.. They resided at 10, Francis Street, Fermoy, with their daughters, Violet Hannah aged 18 years, Ethel Sarah aged 14 years, Mabel Adelaide aged 10 years, and Gwendoline Irene aged 5 years. Their religion was noted as Church of Ireland.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 25, 2013 8:30 am

RICHARD DILLON

76, Meagher's Quay, Waterford

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Richard Dillon - Waterford - 1893

Richard Dillon was the brother of Thomas Dillon Snr (see above post), they were the sons of the Watchmaker, Jonathan Dillon, and the grandsons of the Goldsmith Joseph Dillon, all of Waterford. Richard Dillon remained in Waterford after his brother removed to Galway in 1850.

It is thought Richard and his brother Thomas worked together in the late 1840's, the most noteworthy of their work being the Claddagh ring that was presented to Queen Victoria in c.1849.

Richard Dillon marked his work with a 'R.D' contained within an oblong punch with clipped corners.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 29, 2013 12:02 pm

J. HILSER & SONS (earlier Hilser Brothers - first period)

95, South Main Street, Cork, and 13, Castle Street, Tralee

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Hilser Bros. - Cork - 1875

The business of J. Hilser & Sons/Hilser Brothers is not the easiest one to understand and no doubt this topic and and a separate one for Hilser Brothers (second period) will be the subject of much future editing.

The brothers Hilser, Richard and Joseph, arrived from Germany and set up business at 95, South Main Street, Cork in 1860, naming their firm Hilser Brothers. Following the death of Richard the business was restyled to J. Hilser & Sons, and continued to trade from the South Main Street premises until its closure in 2012, a period of over 150 years in business.

Joseph Hilser was married to Barbara Kallenback.

Joseph Hilser was noted as a Godparent to his nephew (Richard's son), John Joseph Hilser, who was Baptised on the 26th December 1872 at Saints Peter And Paul Church, Cork.

Joseph Hilser's daughter, Rose Hermina Hilser, was baptised at Saints Peter And Paul Church, Cork, on the 7th September 1880. Richard's wife, Josephine, was noted as a Godparent.

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J. Hilser & Sons - Cork - 1900

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J. Hilser & Sons - Cork - 1902

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J. Hilser & Sons - Cork - 1913

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J. Hilser & Sons - Cork - 1921

The 1901 Census has no trace of Joseph or Barbara Hilser. At 15, South Main Street, we find Alfred Hilser, he is described as head of the family, he is a 19 year old Jeweller, unmarried, and born in Cork city. He shares the house with his 23 year old German born cousin, Engelbert Berkley, who is also a Jeweller, and 16 year old Michael Crowly, a Co. Cork born Clockmaker, and a German born female general servant, 25 year old, Bertha Scherzinger. The religion of all of the residents was recorded as Roman Catholic.



The jewelers in Ireland continue to suffer at the hands of all parties, who seem to consider the retailer of precious stones legitimate prey of the warring factions. The latest outrage in which a retail jeweler is the victim occurred at Cork the other day, armed men holding up the premises of Messrs. Hilser just before the closing hour. Employes were ordered back in the workshops at the rear at the point of the revolver. While the intruders were busily engaged in clearing watches, rings and other small articles of jewelry from the shelves and show cases the proprietor (a German interned during the war) arrived on the scene with his son. Before the newcomers were aware of what was going on they were made prisoners inside the shop. The work of packing up the loot then continued calmly and methodically. No heavy plate was touched. The thieves eventually departed with $40,000 worth of jewelry after warning the imprisoned staff and proprietor not to raise an alarm for 20 minutes.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - Volume 82 - 20th April 1921



Some images of the 95, South Main Street premises formerly occupied by J. Hilser & Sons take were taken in December 2012:

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 23, 2013 11:30 am

HILSER BROTHERS (second period)

Grand Parade, Cork, Bandon, and Queenstown

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Hilser Brothers - Cork and Bandon - 1900

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Hilser Brothers - Cork, Bandon, and Queenstown - 1921

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Hilser Brothers - Cork, Bandon, and Queenstown - c.1930

This business was founded by Henry Hilser in the last years of the 19th century and established at Grand Parade, Cork. Henry resurrected the name of his father's and uncle's, Richard and Joseph Hilser, original business that was established at Cork in 1860. Henry's father and mother, Richard and Josephine had arrived from Germany in 1860, but Richard was to die early, and it was perhaps his brother, Joseph, who may have trained Henry, and his younger brothers, Frank and Gregory, into the trade. Henry's mother was Josephine, her maiden name was Duffner, and she was no doubt part of the Duffner family of German watchmakers, who also made Ireland their home in the second part of the 19th century.

Henry Hilser was born on the 12th July 1875 and was baptised 'Henry Patrick Hilser' at the Catholic church of St Peter and Paul's at Cork, just six days later, on the 18th July 1875.

The 1901 Irish census reveals that Henry is a 25 year old Watchmaker and Jeweller, born in Cork, and not married. He lives with his mother, and still head of the family, Josephine, who is a 52 year old widow, born in Germany, and his brother, Frank, a 23 year old Watchmaker and Jeweller, born in Cork and unmarried. Also resident at the time of the census was 59 year old Sophie Duffner. The family are all Catholics, and have one servant living with them and live at 11, Buxton Hill, in the Sunday's Well area of Cork.

The 1911 Irish census reveals Henry as a 36 year old Jeweller of 4, Sunday's Well Road, he is now married to 32 year old, German born, Amelie, they have five daughters, Rita, 9 years old, Amy, 7 years old, Mary, 6 years old, Elsie, 4 years old, and Ursula, 2 years old, they were all born in Cork city. The family are described as Roman Catholics and have two servants living with them.

The 1911 census shows that 62 year old Josephine is still living at 11, Buxton Hill, but now has her 30 year old son living with her. Gregory Hilser is described as a Jeweller born in the city of Cork, he is unmarried. The household has one live-in servant.

In 1902 Henry exhibited his mother's family's clocks from their factory located in the Black Forest region of Germany at the Cork International Industrial Exhibition.

Henry Hilser also opened a shop in Bandon, and later, one in Queenstown, and was followed into the business by three of his five daughters, Mary, Ursula and Rita. Rita left the business when she married but Mary and Ursula remained in the business until they joined by their nephew Harry.

Harry trained as a watchmaker in Switzerland after studying jewellery in the Cork School of Art. In 1962, Harry doubled the size of the original shop in the Grand Parade when he took over the adjoining tobacconists. His daughter Miriam, fifth generation of the family has since entered the business. Miriam is a registered valuer and both Harry and Miriam are past presidents of the Retail Jewellers of Ireland. The firm are still in business today.

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 25, 2013 10:12 am

JAMES WALTON

19, Lower Sackville Street, Dublin

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James Walton - Dublin - 1871

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Re: Firms Working in Ireland in the Late 19th and 20th Centu

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 05, 2013 6:51 am

YEATES & SON

2, Grafton Street, Dublin

Leopold Bloom, the hero "crossed at Nassau Street corner and stood before the window of Yeates and Son, pricing the field glasses.” - James Joyce - "Ulysses"

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Yeates & Son - Dublin - 1877

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Yeates & Sons - Dublin - 1894

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Yeates & Son Ltd. - Dublin - 1907

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Yeates & Son Ltd. - Dublin - 1908

Advertisements claims establishment in 1728/1729


A part chronology of Yeates & Son Ltd. appears to be:

Samuel Yeates (c.1790-1831) - Father of Andrew Yeates, Optician, Optical IM, Math.IM, Astro.IM. of London. Apprenticed to Seacombe Mason (who in turn had been apprenticed to John Margas, son of Jacob Margas [Grimwade p.590]
Samuel Yeates & Son (1832-1839)
George Yeates & Son (1840-c.1864) (George Mitchell Yeates)
Yeates & Son 1865-1901 (Stephen Mitchell Yeates b.1832, d.1901)
Yeates & Son Ltd. by 1907


Messrs. Yates (sic) & Son, Opticians and Scientific Instrument Makers, 2, Grafton Street, –Established fully a century, there is no house in the United Kingdom in its particular line, which is entitled to take higher rank than the old-established and highly respectable firm which forms the subject of this notice. Among opticians and manufacturers of scientific apparatus and appliances, the firm of Yates & Son has received from the public generally the warmest marks of approval, and the most extended patronage. On its inception the house soon began to be known in scientific circles throughout the kingdom for the excellent quality and exactness of its instruments and scientific appliances, and the high name thus honourably earned from the first, it has been the pleasing duty of the present members of the firm to maintain unimpaired. The premises of Messrs. Yates & Son are striking and handsome, and in every way worthy of the name and reputation of the house. The shop is suitably fitted with every modern improvement, and stocked with a rare and expensive assortment of mathematical, scientific, and other instruments, which we venture to say cannot be surpassed–if equalled –by any other house in the trade. We have before us two closely-printed illustrated catalogues, forming indeed only a part of the general catalogue of this valuable stock, which we wish it were within the scope of our present article to deal with fully. These catalogues, dealing with electrical apparatus and appliances, and drawing, surveying, and engineering instruments, seem to cover the whole field of those two subjects in the most comprehensive manner, and display a supply of articles which, for completeness and absolute excellence of workmanship, leaves nothing to be desired. The catalogue (a book in itself of some lifiy odd pages) devoted to electrical apparatus and appliances, is divided under several distinct headings, such as, Frictional electricity ; Voltaic and Galvanic Apparatus, including battery requisites, such as porous cells, flat and round, ebonite cells, etc., etc.; thermo-electric Apparatus; Magneto electric Apparatus (Clarke's, Wilde's, Tisley's, etc.); Induction Coils; Electric Bells and Apparatus ; Electrical Rain Gauges ; Lightning Conductors, and a host of other apparatus and appliances used in every possible branch of electrical or scientific practice or experiment. Each of the subjects the reader will remember is but a heading under which will be found a long list of the various inventions, appliances, or machines, belonging to each class, so that a fair idea of the extent of the firm's stock is in this way arrived at. The drawing, surveying, and general engineering instruments, are catalogued in a book even thicker than that devoted to scientific appliances, running to about sixty pages, and embracing every instrument, from the most familiar, as the compass or a set of parallel rules, to cradle theodolites, clinometers, and elliptographs, whose uses are not so generally understood. The instruments or apparatus manufactured by this house have received the highest testimonials from all quarters, and from all classes of scientific men, and have further received the Award of Merit from experienced judges at various exhibitions, at home and abroad, Messrs Yates & Son being the lucky possessors of about six first-class silver medals. It will not surprise the reader to learn that the firm are makers of instruments by appointment to the University of Dublin, and to the Port of Dublin Corporation ; though it is a little more worthy of notice that the Government High Schools of India also honour the firm with their patronage. All the instruments made by the house have been over and over again pronounced by practical men to be unsurpassable for accuracy, high finish, and durability, and, we may add, for general excellence of workmanship. The head of the firm is a thoroughly practical man, and can go through all the constructive detail of the work as well as any of the foremen in the various departments–a fact, no doubt, which has largely contributed to the great success and prosperity achieved by his house.

Source: Industries of Dublin - 1887

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