Biography of Phillip Rundell

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dognose
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Biography of Phillip Rundell

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 07, 2009 6:37 pm

Philip Rundell (1746-1827) was most often decribed as mean, ruthless, course and tyrannical. Dubbed along with his partner, John Bridge, as 'Oil and Vinegar', Rundell was well known for his ill-temper and Bridge for his calm, charming and affable ways.
As different as these two characters were, as a business partnership, they were amazing, building their firm into the premier goldsmiths of their time.
Rundell's legendary meaness was most often aimed at himself, he would at times be generous to others, and at the end extremely generous and forgetting few.
He should be remembered for bringing together the finest talents of craftsmanship and style and creating the most spectacularly successfull business of the nineteenth century.

This obituary was published soon after his death.

THE LATE PHILIP RUNDELL, Esq. Jeweller to His Majesty.

THE subject of the present Memoirs was born at Bath, in Somersetshire, his father being in the Medical way, of rather an extensive practice, but having a large family, chiefly girls, it was not in his power to give his son Philip more than what may be called a plain education, sufficient for the line of life he was intended to pursue; being bound apprentice to a working jeweller of the city, Bath. At that time there was a great demand for garnet work, which was got up in a superior manner to any that has been manufactured in the trade since; so much so, that having of late years purchased some in the way of business, he selected a pair of ear-rings, which he was proud to show, as his own workmanship, never being above considered as a workman, or a tradesman.

His sisters having married into respectable families, might, as is reported, at his first onset in life, have been of service to him, but by his good fortune in trade, he had, and did repay them ten-fold. His favourite sister, Mrs. Bond, who also is recently deceased, no doubt, had she survived him, would have inherited the bulk of his property; she having for a series of years, superintended the domestic establishment at Ludgate Hill; engaging the female servants, examining their accounts, Sec. both Mr. Rundell and his partner, Mr. Bridge, being single men.

The original concern was conducted by a Mr. Theed, who was a fishing-tackle maker, hence the present well-known sign of the Golden Salmon originated, but, in consequence of Mr. Picket, who was a silversmith by trade, marrying into the family, and being admitted a partner in the concern, they blended both trades together. Mr. Picket being a shrewd person, and finding that Religion in the way of trade, as well as Civic honors, does much, made a point of attending every place of divine worship, of the different sects of dissenters from the established church, daily;–he said, to laid out the right road to Heaven, but it at all events enabled him to find out the road to wealth!

Getting elected Common-council man, Alderman, Sec. he never missed attending any civic feast, with, at that time his great crony, Sir William Curtis. He certainly was the projector of some useful and capital improvements, both in the City and Westminster, viz. Skinner Street, Snow Hill ; and likewise Picket Street Temple-Bar, which bears his name, and for building which, he obtained an act of Parliament to dispose of the same by lottery, which proved a bad speculation, the houses being built on a much too expensive scale.

A melancholy circumstance occurring at this time, was the first step that gave the subject of the present memoir an opportunity of laying the foundation-stone of his future fortune; he at that time being shopman to Mr. Picket. Mr. Bridge, who is now the head of the concern, living there at the same time.

The Alderman dressing to go out to some public dinner, his favourite and youngest daughter was in the act of curling her hair, when her clothes caught fire, which so overpowered the father's feelings, that be had not the power of suppressing the flames, which from her dress being composed of muslin, she was burnt in such a manner as to cause her death; an event he never got the better of, and being incapacitated from attending to business inconsequence, be took Mr. P. Rundell in as an acting partner, to conduct and manage the concern.

About this time, Mr. Bridge, having a more lucrative situation offered him in Bond Street, quitted, for a short time, the concern ; until he was induced to return by an offer of a share in the business by Mr. R., he having, by the following means, obtained the business to himself:-–
Alderman Picket on finding his health declining wished to form an alliance with Mr. R. and his only surviving daughter, but dying rather suddenly, it was not effected ; Mr. R. frequently asserting since, that the only woman he ever had serious thoughts of, was the celebrated Wilkes' daughter, not for her beauty, but her superior mind.

The trade of the house at that time, compared to what it has since risen to, was a mere nothing. Mr. Rundell did not much exert himself, being fond, at that time, of theatrical amusement, having a niece, then a favorite of the public, of the name of Harper, who afterwards became the wife of the celebrated comedian, then called Young Bannister.

With the late Mr. Wroughton of the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, he was particularly intimate. When King, the celebrated Lord Ogleby, Sir Peter Teazle, &c. retired from the stage, his brother performers subscribed, and presented him with a piece of plate, in compliment to his talents. Some years afterwards, his widow being in distressed circumstances, was compelled to part with the same, and requested Mr. John Bannister to dispose of it for her. He mentioned it to Mr. Rundell, who bought the silver cup in the way of trade; but he instantly returned it to the widow, buying it back with his own private purse, requesting her to keep it for the respect he bore the stage.

Miss Picket remonstrating with him (her father having left her his property in the concern), on his supposed inattention to business, he informed her that if she would resign the whole concern into his hands, out of respect to her father, he would allow her a handsome annuity, that should be arranged by mutual friends.–The sum settled on was £800. per annum, but Mr. R. in the most spirited and liberal manner, insisted on its being made a £1000 per annum for her natural life, which she lived to enjoy for a number of years, having purchased a small estate at Castle Bean Hill, near-the residence of the late Duke of Kent.

He then took in Mr. Bridge as partner, and established a concern that has been truly called the Wonder of the World; their name being known and respected in all parts of the globe, both as fair tradesmen, and a mart for any oriental produce. Perhaps two partners never met, whose tempers, tho' diametrically opposite, agreed so well. Mr. R. a man of resolute opinion and extreme lofty mind, rather irritable, but always ready to do a good action;–Mr. Bridge a man of first- rate talent, but mild and condescending; the respect he always experienced from the late Royal Family, His present Majesty, and the whole of the higher circles, by his suavity of manners, is a convincing proof. Each selected their department, Mr. Rundell attending to the home, Mr. Bridge being secretary of state for the foreign, and out-door department; carrying on all correspondence with their different agents which they have had at the Brazils, Turkey, Persia, &c.

Their wealth sprung from various causes. In consequence of the French Revolution, the most respectable refugees who were enabled to make their escape were compelled to part with their jewels. Rundell. &Bridge was the place they flew to dispose of the same; and about this time they purchased the business of Duvall, who was then the Diamond jeweller to the Royal Family. Mr. Rundell being at the head of the concern, went to wait on the late Queen Charlotte at Buckingham House, but not being courtier enough in his manners, and not possessing the politesse of his predecessor, did not exactly please; but Mr. Bridge going on the next occasion, gave entire satisfaction, and continued to attend on them for the remainder of their lives; indeed, his late majesty would hold converse with Mr. B. on the most familiar subjects.

During the late war, the Patriotic Fund at Lloyd's was continually voting silver cups, some valued at 100 guineas, some 50, to our different naval officers, also pieces of plate to military officers, for signal services ; continually bringing the relatives to witness the same, made the shop known to every person of respectability in all parts of the kingdom, they always keeping civil persons in their employ to show anything worth seeing. It was not an unusual circumstance for a bank-note to be enclosed to the Firm, requesting them to send jewellery to the amount, (relying on their well- known respectability), which was always done to the satisfaction of the parties sending.

In consequence of the great increase of business, two nephews of Mr. Rundell were admitted as partners in the concern ; one, Edmund Walker Rundell, son of Maria Rundell, authoress of the celebrated Book of Cookery ; the other, Thomas Bigge, who married his cousin the sister of Edmund Walker Rundell.

The old gentleman, as he was designated, though his sister-in-law catered so well for the appetite, detested an epicure, and to be seen eating pickles, or any provocative to appetite, was high treason, to-be done by any one in his employ ; being himself, of late years, extremely plain in his diet, and very abstemious in his meals. But a good table was always provided for his domestics, whom, married and single, boarded in the house.

His nephew, Edmund Walker Rundell, not marrying the wife he had selected for him, which was a niece of the late Alderman Boydell, and now the wife of the present Marshall of the King's Bench–and taking the liberty of choosing a wife for himself, without asking his uncle's consent, gave him great offence, and caused a coolness for a length of time ; but he attended at the wedding, and gave a cheque on his banker for £500, his usual douceur to any of his nephews or nieces that married.

In the year 1805, they commenced making an immense service of plate for his present Majesty, then Prince of Wales, which, in magnificence, far exceeded any thing of the kind ever seen before in this country, both as to design and execution. It became quite the rage amongst the higher circles to drive down to Ludgate Hill, to see the Prince's plate, which must have been a source of immense wealth, most making purchase of some trinket or other ; they having about the same time a continual supply of gems or coloured stones, then the fashion, from the Brazils.

Mr. R. well knowing that Mr. Picket's attention to religion might not be the most sincere, he did not pay much attention to it himself, as nothing he despised more than a hypocrite; consequently, Sunday to him was high change, and he used, on that day, to have one or two workmen employed in looking out diamonds, and regulating the affairs of the week with as much anxiety as if he was not worth a farthing–when he was in possession of hundreds of thousands, and no child, at least no legitimate one, to leave it to. He has a natural son, named Thomas, whom he set up in business, and advanced money to several times, but of late years he has completely discarded him, through his misconduct. He has not even mentioned him in his will.

He has had for many years under his protection, a Mrs. Wartridge, (formerly under the protection of Counsellor Neave,) of Spring Gardens and Regent's Park, at whose house he departed this life ; indeed, all his life he has been what is called a gay man, among a certain class of women, and sometimes would attend at their petit 'soupers, when he did not mind opening his purse-strings, and when they came down to the Hill, would pay them as much attention as the first ladies in the land.
Among the rest was Mrs. Lashley, then under the protection of the Marquis of Wellesley, but better known by the name of Moll Raffles. Mr. Rundell sending some articles of jewellery for her to look at, she made choice of a diamond padlock, value 800 guineas, to begin with, to the marquis' account, who, when informed of this circumstance, desired Rundell to let her have articles to the amount of £2,000 and no more. Mr. R. being at a sale at Phillips's, in Bond Street, Moll Raffles being ill her carriage, shopping, called out to Mr. R.–' I say, is them spoons done yet that was to be rubbed over with gold ;' alluding to some gilt desert-spoons, then making for her. He replied he would let her know; be did, which cost a pair of diamond ear-rings, value £250, which was entered as cash to his private account.

Whatever Mr. Rundell thought he would speak. His Royal Highness the late Duke of York, one day came down to look at some gold snuff-boxes. Mr. Bridge being absent at the same time, a shopman in the employ was showing them ; Mr. R. who was rather in dishabille, also attending on his Royal Highness Mr. R. having left the shop to obtain something to show to the Duke, he ascertained that it was Mr. Rundell that was in attendance ; when the following dialogue took place :–
The Duke.–' Mr. Rundell, you must be a very rich man. !'
Mr. R.–Lord bless your Royal Highness, quite the contrary, I assure you:–people imagine we are rich, and never think of paying us; consequently we must be poor: if we could get in our just debts we might then be rich.

His Royal Highness never made any reply, but put down the box he was looking at, requesting Mr. Bridge might be sent to him.
It had the desired effect, for the next day his Royal Highness sent a cheque for £500. to be placed to his account,–which pleased Mr. Rundell as much as if he had received it as a gift, exclaiming to Mr. Bridge–' There, G– damme, sir, I am sure you could get money were you to ask for it.

In the year 1806-7 he had his will made by A. Humphreys, Solicitor, of Harper Street, with whom at that time there used to subsist as great a degree of friendship and partiality as there recently has been shown to Mr. Joseph Neald, his nephew, who, it appears, has prepared the last will.
Having called Mr. Bridge and the whole of the shopmen, clerks, shop- women, porters, &c. into the back shop, he stated that he had made his will, and that it was his request, when he died, he might be buried in Mortlake church-yard, that the shop should be closed for one day only, that Mr. B would follow him, and that if his wish was not complied with–' you know I have astonished you all in my life, and by G-d I will come back and astonish you again. His bequest to his servants at that time was numerous, if not so great as the present.

To prove that money gets money, one of the late Goldschmidt's, the great Jew contractors, returning from Downing-street, where he had been negotiating a loan–informed Mr. Rundell he had not filled the whole, but was going upon 'Change to fill the remainder–£.100,000. Mr. Rundell told him to put in his name. In about an hour he returned, stating that the house of Robarts, Curtis, & Co. having made a tender, wished to get the contract, offering a premium of 2 per cent, which, he wished to take, if agreeable to him. Mr. R. said he might do as he liked. In a short time he received a cheque for the 2 per cent commission on £100,000, though never called on to advance a penny, his name being sufficient. Many a time when the whole of the domestics were asleep, be would leave his bed, and come down in the shop and inspect the shopmen's books, make extracts from their orders, examine their draws, &c. then question them at breakfast time, and if they asserted an order was finished which proved not to be the case, they were sure to be detected, then Lord help them for that day.

His spirit for trade has caused an era in the silver trade hitherto unknown; employing such artists as the celebrated Flaxman to design for him, heedless of the expense; the Shield of Achilles being modeled by him, (but made at their own manufactory in Dean Street, Soho) which is allowed to be the chef d'oeuvrein the art of silver chasing, and a match for the work of Benvenuto Cellini, the celebrated. To give some idea of the work executed, the firm of Rundell, Bridge, and Rundell, contracted with the conductors of their manufactory, Messrs. Storr and Co., who had an interest in the quantity of silver, used to supply them with10,000 oz. monthly, and frequently that was not sufficient to meet the demand ; and one working jeweller's account in one year amounted to £11,000 and upwards.

Some years back a digested robbery of great magnitude was effected, planned by some Jews who well knew the mode of conducting business at Ludgate Hill: it was stated to amount to £22,000. It was effected by the following stratagem:–A person who affected to be an interpreter, introduced a military-looking personage, with mustachios etc. who pretended he could only speak Russ, and that be was deputed by the Emperor of Russia to select some unique diamonds and pearls. Having selected the most valuable in the house, they were sealed up in a paper box, and put away for a few days, while good bills were brought for their payment. Having made some purchases of trifling value, they were put by also in a paper box of the same size. In a short time afterwards, the same party called again, and being shown into a private room, they wished to inspect the articles, one of’ the partners with a clerk being present. While the seals were being broke, the interpreter called the partner out, requesting an advance on his commission. He going down stairs to consult on the subject, they contrived to ring the changes with the boxes, leaving one filled with cotton and penny pieces near the same weight, and got clear off with the booty.

This affair made so much noise at the time, that for weeks- Ludgate Hill was like a fair; ultimately, they gained by the loss, having, through the medium of Vickery, the present governor of the House of Correction, who went on the Continent-for the purpose, got a great part back. Through their interest Vickery got made Governor.

The shopmen in-the employ have shared upwards of £30 each individual for his share of the Christmas boxes. The different sums given to the workmen in the employ being stated to Mr. R., he in the most liberal manner, added from his private purse, every year, £100 to be distributed with the rest; and on the same day, should he be going to Spring Gardens to dinner, he would walk up Fleet Street, and take a coach at the end of Fetter Lane, to save a sixpence, the fare being from there only a shilling, but eighteen-pence from Bridge Street.

Of late he had been much afflicted with a complaint of many years standing–a dreadful stricture, being continually compelled to use instruments to force a passage, etc. so much so, that he was particularly recommended by his medical adviser, Sir Everhard Home, to retire from business altogether, and it may be said he was weaned from it by degrees, like a child from the breast.

He had a house in the Crescent Bridge Street, for his easy access to the Hill; and the splendid alteration now made in the premises, (which formerly consisted of a few old houses hanging together) would never have taken place till he withdrew from the concern, a circumstance at one time never expected; he frequently stating he should like to die under his diamond table! He was also afflicted with deafness, at least he said so, but he could frequently hear what was not intended for him.

He has frequently, when he has been sleeping out, got up and come to Ludgate Hill at an unseasonable hour, to see the premises were properly guarded. One night he rang the bell for a considerable time before he could gain admission–the porter, an Irishman in the employ, being in a sound sleep. The moment the door was opened he set into him a la Crib–the porter returned the compliment, and Mr. R. finding himself getting the worst of the contest, sung out for help, when down came the maids, or female servants, in their chemises, to part the combatants. The next morning he enquired who let him in on the over-night ; the fellow, who expected to get discharged, was complimented on his prowess, and received a bank note for his defending the premises; be stating that he thought it was a person trying to break in. The brother of the party, who had the care of the secondhand plate, giving Mr. R. what he deemed an impertinent answer, he knocked one of his teeth out, but it proved a golden tooth for him, being allowed two guineas per ann. for a new one, while he continued in his employ, which be made a rule to apply for, contenting himself with a second-hand ivory one, obtained from Parkinson.

Mr. Rundell being known to be a man of immense property, consequently had a number of letters sent to him, either for charitable purposes, or from relations inquiring after his health, letting him know that they had not forgot him, hoping also he would not forget them; it therefore became necessary that he should have a confidential person to answer all letters. He made choice of Jos. Neald, Jim., a professional man, (of the house of Neald and Fladgale) who was unremitting in his attention, well knowing he should reap a golden harvest for relinquishing his professional pursuits. Latterly, Mr. R. signifying a wish to see his old chere amie, Mrs. W., who has a snug retreat at the south end of the Regent's Park, the old gentleman was so pleased with the situation as to propose becoming a boarder; consequently, it being her house, he was invisible to all but Mr. Neald, and his own man-servant; Mr. Neald bringing, or sending the servant to town for all letters, and answering the same;– Mrs. W. providing nurses, who waited on him night and day, ample provision being made to remunerate them for their trouble. . .

He departed this life on Feb. 17, 1827, aged 84, at Mrs. Wartridge's, Regent's Park (but was removed to Bridge Street for interment), and buried at Hendon Church, in a genteel, but not splendid manner, on the following Saturday.


ABSTRACT OF THE WILL.
Mrs. Maria Rundell, sister-in-law .... £20,000

Edmund Waller Rundell, nephew and partner.... £10,000

Mary Anne, wife of ditto, (both of Wandsworth, Surrey) . .' . £10,000

Thomas Bigge, nephew and partner, bond for £20,000and.share in the business .....£5,000

Maria, wife of T. Bigge, and sister of E. W. Rundell .... £5,000

Elizabeth Anderson, wile of Col. Anderson, daughter of the above, and her husband ....£20,000

Nine other children of the above Thomas and Maria Bigge, Brompton, in the county of Middlesex -....£45,000

George Booth Tyndale, Solicitor-General, of Lincoln's Inn Fields . . .£5,000

Margaret Tyndale, wife of ditto, and niece of the deceased.... £5,000

Two children of the above, John and Octavia Tyndale....£ 10,000

Rev. J. Strong, and Wife... £10,000

Four children of the above.... £20,000

Thomas Goldney, nephew, of St. James's-street. West- minster . £6,000

Charlotte Goldney, wife of the above ... £ 5,000

Five children of the above

Thomas Goldney . . £25,000

Mrs. E. Goldney, wife of F. Bennett Goldney, nephew of the deceased. . £10,000

Nine children of the above

Mrs. E. Goldney . . £45,000

Samuel Goldney, nephew of the deceased . . . £20,000

Mrs. Milward, niece of the deceased . . . £5,000

Seven Children of Mrs. Milward . . . . £35,000

Mr. Albany Bond, nephew of the deceased, of Ware, in Hertfordshire.... £3,000

Eleanora Cobham, daughter of the above Albany Bond... £3,000

Eight other children of Albany Bond . . . £24,000

Joseph Neald the elder, Solicitor, late of Surrey-street, Strand ... £5,000

Mary Neald, wife of the above and niece to the deceased.... £5,000

John Bannister, comedian, and at his decease to his daughter ....£5,000

To the Bath Hospital. £500

to the different Institutions, £. an follows :–-St. Luke's ; Magdalen; Female Penitentiary ; Asylum; Indigent Blind; Deaf and Dumb School; Bartholomew's Hospital; Middlesex Hospital; Westminster Hospital; Lock Hospital; Lying-in Hospital; Saint George's Hospital; Jew's Hospital ; Philanthropic Institution, and Royal British Institution . . £30,000

THE CODICIL:
Signed the 4th February 1827.
Elizabeth Wartridge, who was under the protection of deceased . . . £5,000
Henry Mills & Charles Mills, 9,000
G. Fox, shopman, £100. ;
A. W. Sutton, cashier, £100
W. Smith, clerk, £100;
G. A. Walker, late clerk, £100
J. Manning, £200
Peter Manning, porter, £200
A. Evors, clerk, £50.;
R. Cracknell, shopman, £50
E. Sevaine, J. Higgins, J. Skearsley and -wife, and W. Goring, porters, £20. each:
J. Bennet, nurse, £100
J. Fuller, coachman, £25
J. Capron, footman, £50 and A. Frost, cook, £50. . . . £1,225

£. 405,725

The residue of his property, after payment of these legacies, to his nephew, Joseph Neald, Esq. solicitor, son of the above Joseph and Mary Neald, who with Abraham Wildey Robarts, of Lombard- Street, banker, are joint executors of the above.
The stamp-duty upon the probate is £15,000., and the property sworn to is £1,000,000 and upwards.


Source: The Portfolio of Entertaining & Instructive Varieties in History, Literature, Fine Arts, Etc. ...
Published by Duncombe., 1827


It is estimated that Philip Rundell's fortune would be worth in today's terms as £4.1 bn.

Trev.
.

Doos
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Postby Doos » Sun Feb 08, 2009 6:29 am

Hi Trev,

Thank you.
Is there any mention of mourning rings in the will?
.

dognose
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Postby dognose » Sun Feb 08, 2009 6:46 am

Hi Alain,

Not that I've found.

He was, however, remembered in a different way, at least by his great-nephew, Joseph Neeld, who inherited the bulk of Rundell's fortune, by the creation of a marble bust by Edward Hodges Baily.

See: http://www.npg.org.uk/collections/searc ... ID=mp06582

Regards Trev.
.

dognose
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Posts: 40584
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Location: England

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 08, 2009 7:48 am

Hi Alain,

Yes there is!

Below is the full transcript of Philip Rundell's will.

Mr. Rundell's Will.

This is the last will and testament of me, Philip Rundell, of the Crescent in New Bridge Street, in the City of London, Esq.: – I desire and direct that all my just debts, and my funeral and testamentary expenses may be paid and satisfied by and out of my personal estate, as soon as conveniently can be after my decease. I give and bequeath unto my sister-in-law, Mrs. Maria Rundell, the sum of £20,000. And whereas I was engaged for 50 years and upwards in the trade or business of a jeweller and goldsmith, on Ludgate Hill, in the city of London, and, in conjunction with my late partners, carried on the same to a very great extent, and I thereby acquired the fortune which I now possess: And whereas I have given to my nephew, Edmund Waller Rundell, a share in my said business, and also an estate in the county of Somerset; and I have also given to my nephew, Thomas Bigge, a share in my said business, and also my bond for £20,000. ; and which shares in my said business have since been greatly increased in value to my said nephews, by my late retirement from business; now, in addition to the provisions and gifts heretofore made by me, for and to my said two nephews, I do hereby give to them and their wives, respectively, the following legacies; – that is to say, to my said nephew, Edmund Waller Rundell, the sum of £10,000.; and to Mary Ann, the wife of the said Edmund Waller Rundell, the like sum of £10,000. ; and to my said nephew, Thomas Bigge, the sum of £5000., and to Maria, the wife of the said Thomas Bigge, the like sum of £5000. I give and bequeath unto my niece, Elizabeth Anderson, one of the daughters of my said nephew, Thomas Bigge, and the wife of Colonel Anderson, the sum of £10,000;., and to her husband, the said Colonel Anderson, the like sum of £10,000. I give and bequeath unto each and every of the nine other children of my said nephew, Thomas Bigge, and Maria his wife, that is to say, Augusta Bigge, Maria Bigge, Georgina Bigge, James Rundell Bigge, Charles Richard Bigge, John Bigge, Emily Bigge, and Francis Bigge, the sum of £5,000. a-piece.

I give and bequeath unto Mr. George Booth Tyndale the sum of £5000., and unto his wife, Margaret Tyndale, the like sum of £5000.: and I give and bequeath unto each of their two children, John Tyndale and Octavia Tyndale, the sum of £5,000. a-piece.

I give and bequeath unto Colonel Shuldham the sum of £5000., and unto his wife Harriet the like sum of £5,000.

I give and bequeath unto the Rev. Thomas Strong the sum of £5000., and unto his wife Augusta the like sum of £5,000, and unto each and every of the four children of the said Thomas Strong and Augusta his wife, that is to say, Edmund Strong, William Philip Strong, Thomas Augusta Strong, and Arthur Rnndell Strong, the sum of £5000 a-piece.

I give and bequeath unto Mr. Thomas Goldney the sum of £5,000, and. unto his wife, Charlotte Goldney, the like sum of £5,000, and unto each and every of their five children, that is to say, Philip Goldney, Adam Goldney, Charlotte Goldney, Amelia Goldney, and Eleonora Goldney, the sum of £5,000 a-piece.
I give and bequeath unto my executors, hereinafter named, the sum of £10,000. in trust for the sole and separate use of Mrs. Elizabeth Goldney, the wife of Francis Bennett Goldney, for and during her natural life; and from and immediately after the death of the said Elizabeth Goldney, in case the said Francis Bennett Goldney shall be then living, then in trust for the use of the said Francis Bennett Goldney, for and during his natural life; and from and immediately after the death of the survivor of them, the said Francis Bennett Goldney and Elizabeth Goldney, then in trust for all and every the child or children of the said Francis Bennett Goldney and Elizabeth, his wife, in equal shares and proportions, share and share alike; and in addition to the trust monies lastly hereinbefore mentioned, I give and bequeath unto each and every of the nine children of the said Francis Bennett Goldney and Elizabeth his wife, that is to say, Francis Bennett Goldney the younger, Henry Gabriel Goldney, Samuel Alfred Goldney, Philip Goldney, Horatio Nelson Goldney, Arthur Goldney, George Goldney, Eleanora Goldney, and Mary Greenaway Goldney, the sum of £5,000 a-piece.

I give and bequeath to Mr. Samuel Goldney the sum of £20,000.

I give and bequeath unto my executors the further sum of £5000. in trust, for the sole use and benefit of Mrs. Eleanor Milward, the wife of Mr. John Milward, for and during her patural life; and from and immediately after the death of the said Eleanora Milward, then in trust for all and every the child or children of the said Eleanora Milvvard, in equal shares and proportions, share and share alike ; and in addition to the trust monies lastly hereinbefore mentioned, I give and bequeath unto each and every of the seven children of the said Eleonora Milward, that is to say, Anthony Milward, Robert Milward, Octavius Rundell Milward, Eleanora Milward, Mary Anne Milward, Amelia Milward, and Maria Milward, the sum of £5000 a-piece.

I give and bequeath unto my executors the further sum of £2000 sterling, in trust, for the sole use and benefit of Mrs. Susannah Milward, for and during her natural life; and from and immediately after the decease of the said Susannah Milward, then, in trust, for Susannah Milward the younger, the daughter of the said Susannah Milward, absolutely.

I give and bequeath unto Mr. Albany Carrington Bond the sum of £3000. sterling, and unto his wife the like sum of £3000 sterling.

I give and bequeath unto my executors the further sum of £5,000 sterling, in trust, for the sole use and benefit of Mrs. Eleanora Dunster Cobbam, one of the daughters of the said Albany Carrington Bond, and the wife of Mr. – Cobham, for and during her natural life; and from and immediately after the decease of the said Eleanora Dunster Cobham, then, in trust, for the next of kin, then living, of the said Eleanora Dunster Cobham, absolutely and for ever; and I give and bequeath unto each and every of their eight other children, that is to say, Mary Ann Dunster Bond, Albany Bond, Louisa Bond, Susannah Bond, Emma Bond, Frederick Bond, Catherine Kirwan Bond, and Henry Bond, the sum of £3000. a-piece. . .

I give and bequeath unto my executors the further sum of £5,000, in trust, for Mr. John Bond, for and during his natural life; and from and immediately after the death of the said John Bond, then, in i rust, for the sole benefit of Mrs. Ann Hullah, the daughter of the said John Bond, and the wife of Mr. Charles 1 Hullah, for and during her natural life ; and from and immediately after the death of the survivor of them the said John Bond and Ann Hullah, then, in trust, for the next of kin then living of the said Ann Hullah.
give and bequeath unto Mr. Joseph Neeld, the elder, the sum of £5,000, and unto his wife, Mary Neeld, the like sum of £5,000 I give and bequeath unto Mr. John Neeld, son of the said Joseph and Mary Neeld, the sum of £5,000, I give and bequeath unto Maria Neeld, daughter of the said Joseph and Mary Neeld, the sum of £2,000, and to her sister, Rosina Neeld, the like sum of £2,000.

I give and bequeath unto my executors the further sum of £5,000, in trust, for the use of Mr. John Bannister, the elder, for and during his natural life; and from and immediately after the decease of the said John Bannister, then, in trust, for the sole use and benefit of his daughter, Elizabeth Morgan, the wife of Mr. Stephen Morgan.

I give and bequeath unto the three orphan children of the late Mr. and Mrs. Eickie, another of the daughters of the said John Bond, the sum of £3,000, to be equally divided between and among them, share and share alike.

I give and bequeath unto my executors the sum of £2,500, in trust, for Mr. Thomas Harper, for and during his natural life; and from and immediately after his death, then, in trust, for his son, Mr. Henry Harper.

I give and bequeath unto my executors the further sum of £2,500 sterling, in trust, for the sole use of Mrs. Maria Cherer, the wife of Mr. Henry Cherer, for and during her natural life ; and from and immediately after her death, then, in trust, for all and every her child or children, equally to be divided between and among them, if more than one, share and share alike; and in case she shall die childless, then, in trust, for the said Henry Harper.

I give and bequeath unto my friend, Abraham Wilday Robarts, Esq., one of my executors, the sum of £500.

I give and bequeath unto Captain Gelston the sum of £100, and unto Mr. Stephen Morgan the sum of £100, and unto Mr. John Bannister, the younger, the sum of £100, and unto Mr. Charles Bannister the sum of £100, and unto Captain James Wrotton the sum of £100, and unto Mr. William Harper the sum of £100, and unto Captain White the sum of £100, and unto Mr. Robert Kirwan the sum of £100, and unto the Rev. George Hutton Wilkinson the sum of £100, and unto the Rev. Thomas Hyde Ripley the sum of £100, and unto Mr. Du Thon the sum of £100, and unto Mrs. Ann Staunton the sum of £100, and unto each of the unmarried daughters of my late friend, Charles Blatchley, Esq., the sum of £100 a-piece.

I give and bequeath the sum of £500 to the Treasurer for the time being of the Bath Hospital, to be applied for the purposes of that Institution.

I give and bequeath the sum of £200 to the Treasurer for the time being of each and every of the Charitable Institutions next hereinafter mentioned, that is to say, St. Luke's Hospital, in Old Street Road; the Magdalen Hospital, in the Blackfriar's Road; the Female Penitentiary at Pentonville, in the county of Middlesex; the Asylum for Female Orphans, at or near Westminster Bridge, and Saint George's Fields; the school for Indigent Blind, in St. George's Fields; the School for the Deaf and Dumh, in or near the Kent Road, and near St. George's Fields; the London Hospital, at Whitechapel; St. Bartholomew's Hospital, in the City of London ; the Middlesex Hospital, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone; the Westminster Hospital, in the city of Westminster; the Lock Hospital, in the county of Middlesex; the Lying-in Hospital, in Aldersgate Street, London; St. George's Hospital, at Hyde Park corner; the Jews' Hospital, at Mile End ; the Philanthropic Institution, in St. George's Fields, to be applied to the benevolent and charitable purposes of those establishments respectively;
and I give and bequeath the sum of £200 to the treasurer for the time being of an Institution, at or near Spitalfields, called the Royal British Institution, to be applied to the purposes of that Institution. I give and bequeath unto the Master and Wardens, and the several persons constituting the Court of Assistants of the Drapers' Company, at the time of my death, and to Edward Lawford, Esq. their clerk and solicitor, a mourning ring a-piece, of the value of five guineas each. And as to all the rest and residue of my property, estate, and effects, as well real as personal, or mixed, and whatsoever and wheresoever, in possession, reversion, remainder, and expectancy, and which I have the power to dispose of by this my will, I give, devise, and bequeath the same, and every part thereof, unto my esteemed friend, Joseph Neeld the younger, of the Inner Temple, Esq. To hold the same unto and to the only use of the said Joseph Neeld, his heirs, executors, administrators, and assigns, according to the nature, tenure, and description of the said property, respectively, for his own benefit and advantage, absolutely and for ever. Provided always, and my will is, that no legacy hereby given shall operate as a release to the legatee, of any debt which, at the time of my death, may be owing to me, by or from any legatee. Provided also, and my will further is, that the legacies heretofore given shall be considered as additions to any gift, provision, or advancement which I have heretofore made or may hereafter make, during my lifetime, unto or in favour of any of the beforementioned legatees. – And I do hereby expressly ratify and confirm all bonds, deeds, settlements, and other instruments by which I have made, or at any time before my death shall make, any such gift, provision, or advancement. Provided always, and my will is, that all and every the legacies hereinbefore given to women who are married, or who shall be married at the time of my death, shall be deemed and taken to be in trust for their sole and separate use respectively, independently of their several and respective hushands, and shall be applied and disposed of for their personal benefit accordingly, during their respective lives; and their receipts for the interest, dividends, and annual proceeds thereof, during their respective livev shall, notwithstanding their coverture, respectively, be valid and effectual discharges to my said trustees, for what in such receipts shall be expressed or acknowledged to be received respectively; and from and immediately after their deaths respectively, shall go and be paid and applied in such manner as they shall respectively direct or appoint, by their respective last wills or testaments in writing, or any codicil thereto, or any paper or writing in the nature of, or purporting to be, their last will and testament, respectively; and, in default of such appointment, to their next of kin respectively. Provided also, and my will further is, and I do direct that my executors, or the survivors of them, their executors or administrators, do and shall, with all convenient speed, after my decease, lay out and invest the several sums of £10,000. £5,000. £5,000. £5,000. £5,000. £3,600. £2,500. and £2,500. hereinbefore bequeathed to them in trust, as aforesaid, in or upon some one or all of the parliamentary stocks or public funds of Great Britain: or at interest upon Government or real securities, at interest in England, in his or their own name or names, with liberty to alter, vary, and transpose, the same stocks, funds, or securities, for others of the like nature, as occasion may require, and they or he shall see fit; and do and shall pay the interest, dividends, and annual proceeds of the said stocks, funds, or securities, from time to time, unto the several and respective persons entitled thereto respectively, according to the trust herein before expressed; and with respect to the interest, dividends, and annual proceeds which shall become payable to the said Elizabeth Goldney, Eleanora Milward, Susanna Milward, Eleanora Dungtor Cobham, Ann Hullah, Elizabeth
Morgan, and Maria C'herer, during their respective lives, as aforesaid, it is my express will and desire, that my executors, or the survivor of them, his executors or administrators, do and shall pa; the same, when and as the same shall respect- ively become due and payable, into the due and proper hands of the said Elizabeth Goldney, Eleanora Milward, Susannah Milward, Eleanora Dunster Cobham, Ann Hullah, Elizabeth Morgan, and Maria Cherer, respectively, or unto such person or persons as they respectively, whether covert or sole, by any writing under their respective bands from time to time, but not by any of anticipation, shall appoint to the intent that the same interest, dividends, and annual proceeds, may be for the sole and separate use of the said Elizabeth Goldney, Eleanora Milward, Susannah Milward, Eleanora Dunster Cobham, Ann Hullah, Elizabeth Morgan, and Maria Cherer, respectively, and not subject to the debts, control, engagements, or interference of their present respective hushands, or of any future hushands whom they respectively may marry; and I direct that the receipts of the said Elizabeth Goldney, Eleanora Milward, Susannah Milward, Eleanora Dunster Cobham, Ann Hullah, Elizabeth Morgan, and Maria Cherer, respectively, or of their respective appointees, for their respective interest, dividends, and annual proceeds, shall, whether they shall be sole or covert, respectively, be effectual discharges for the money which, in such receipts, shall be expressed or acknowledged to be received. Provided also, and my mill further is, that no child or children of any of my said nephews or nieces shall take a vested interest in the portions or legacies hereinbefore provided for them respectively, who, being a son or sons, shall die under the age of 21 years; or, being a daughter or daughters, shall die under that age and without having been married; and that the share or shares, as well original as accruing by survivorship, of each and every such child or children so dying, without acquiring a vested interest as aforesaid, shall from time to time go and accrue to such of his, her, or their brothers and sisters, as shall live to acquire a vested interest in their own respective portions or legacies, under this my will. Provided also, and my will further is, that the interest, dividends, and annual proceeds of the respective presumptive portions of the several and respective children of my said nephews and nieces respectively, or so much thereof as my executors, or the survivor of them, his executors or administrators shall think fit, shall and may, from time to time, until their respective portions shall become vested, be applied, in the discretion of my said executors, in and towards the maintenance, support, and education of such child or children respectively, and that the surplus thereof shall be accumidated in augmentation of the respective portions from which the same shall arise, and go along with and accrue to the same, as if originally constituting a part thereof. And I do hereby nominate, constitute, and appoint, Abraham Wilday Robarts, of Lombard Street, in the city of London, Esq. and Joseph Neeld the younger, of the Inner Temple, London, Esq. executors of this my will. Provided always, and I do hereby further declare, that my said trustees and executors, and each of them, and their respective heirs, executors, and administrators, and every of them, shall be charged and chargeable respectively, for such monies as they only respectively shall actually receive, by virtue of this my will, notwithstanding their or any of their signing, or joining in signing, any receipt or receipts for the sake of conformity ; and that any one or more of them shall not be answerable or accountable for the other or others of them, or for any involuntary losses: and also that it shall and may be lawful for them, with and out of the monies which shall come to their respective hands by virtue of this my will, to retain to and reimburse themselves respectively, and to allow to their respective co-trustee or co-trustees, all such charges, damages,
and expenses which they, or either or any of them, shall or may suffer, sustain, expend, or be put into, in or about the execution of the aforesaid trusts, or in relation thereto. And lastly, I do hereby revoke all former and other wills by me at any time heretofore made, and do declare this to be my only true last will and testament. In witness whereof, I the said Philip Rundell, have to this my last will and testament, subscribed and set my hand and seal, this 4th day of February, in the year of our Lord, 1827.

PHILIP RUNDELL.

THE CODICIL.

This is a codicil to and to be taken as part of the last will and testament of me, Philip Rundell, of the Crescent, New Bridge Street, in the city of London, Esquire, and which will is dated this 4th day of February, 1827.

I give and bequeath unto Mrs. Elizabeth Wartridge, the sum of £5,000.

I give and bequeath unto Henry Mills the sum of £4,500.

I give and bequeath unto Charles Mills the sum of £4,500.

I give and bequeath unto George Fox, the elder, Arthur White Button, William Smith, and George Alexander Walker, who were formerly in my service in business, the sum of £100, each.

I give and bequeath unto John Manning and Peter Manning, the sum of £200 each.

I give and bequeath unto Alexander Evors and Richard Cracknell, the sum of £50 each.

I give and bequeath unto Edward Swaine, John Higgins, John Skearsley, and William Goring, formerly my shopmen, the sum of £20 each.

I give and bequeath unto Anne Roots, the like sum of £20.

I give and bequeath unto my nurses and servants, if they shall be in my service at the time of my decease, the following sums, viz. : to Mrs. Jane Bennett the sum of £100; to Ann Frost the sum of £50; to Mary Stokes the sum of £25; to James Capron the sum of £50 ; and to John Fuller the sum of £25. And in all other respects I do expressly ratify and confirm my said will. In witness whereof I, the said Philip Rundell, have, to this codicil to my last will and testament, subscribed and set my band and seal, this 4th day of February, 1827.

PHILIP RUNDELL.

Regards Trev.
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buckler
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Postby buckler » Sun Feb 08, 2009 10:54 am

Many thanks Trev !
Can we have more of this sort of thing please ?

Quite a few of us spend hours researching very obscure silver matters - much of it of interest to very few people. When we die, our executors throw it all away. Very often it's the poor research that gets published, because the best is never finished and dies with the originator.
Anyone for example who knew the late Michael Reinhold still sorely misses his total expertise on Exeter. But he was never to publish anything and although I think I know where his notes etc went, they have yet to surface .
So if anyone has anything to tell, please do so.
Also thank the contributor - I posted a piece on lady silversmiths on SMP and was very discouraged to get no feedback. But was told that in fact it's had hundreds of hits.
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buckler
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Postby buckler » Sun Feb 08, 2009 12:30 pm

John Bannister - comedian

????????????
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dognose
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Postby dognose » Sun Feb 08, 2009 12:54 pm

Hi Clive,

Yes, the same.

This book has mention of Rundell and Bannister.

Reminiscences of Henry Angelo: With Memoirs of His Late Father and Friends, Including Numerous Original Anecdotes and Curious Traits of the Most Celebrated Characters that Have Flourished During the Past Eighty Years
By Henry Angelo
Published by H. Colburn and R. Bentley, 1830
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=TvALAAAAYAAJ

Regards Trev.
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Doos
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Postby Doos » Sun Feb 08, 2009 1:15 pm

Thanks Trev,

5 guineas would equal about 4000 pounds today in purchasing power according to http://www.measuringworth.com/ppoweruk/ . Must have been quite the rings.

I have the will of Jeremy Bentham - who died in the same period - in which he bequeathed a ring to John Stuart Mill (of which I have an image .. of the ring that is), but the scan is so poor that it is unreadable. The national archive promised to scan me a better copy. Would be interesting to see what that ring cost back then.
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dognose
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Re: Biography of Phillip Rundell

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 23, 2016 6:52 am

The numerous readers of Greville's memoirs will probably remember his references to the great court jewellers, Rundell & Bridge. He mentions that the former left a larger amount of personality than had ever hitherto been sworn to at Doctors' Commons—a remarkable circumstance, which probably may be accepted as indicating that he was the wealthiest shopkeeper that England, up to that time, had ever known. Mr. Rundell left the bulk of his property to his great-nephew, one Joseph Neeld (not Neal, as Mr. Greville has it), and that gentleman's son proceeded to found a family by buying a large landed estate and marrying the sister of the philanthropic Lord Shaftesbury. The marriage was productive of neither family nor felicity, and the estates passed, at his death, to his brother, who was made a baronet in 1859. This gentleman, very ungratefully, entirely " sinks the shop " in his pedigree, which preserves as stony a silence about old Uncle Rundell, from whom all the good things come, as another family which has sprung to fame from brass-button making does of its founder. Perhaps if old Rundell, notoriously gruff and surly to most of his belongings, could have foreseen how completely he was to have been suppressed, he would have founded the Rundell Hospital instead of the Neeld family, after the fashion of George Heriot.

"Jingling Geordie " began business, in a very small way, in Edinburgh about 1580. The little shop he occupied was only pulled down in 1809, when the bellows and forge which he had used were found there. James I. took such a fancy to him that he brought him up to London, and by 1624, when he died, the Jingler had acquired a fortune of 50,000l., which represented more than three times that sum to-day.

Jewellers in those days, and for long after, were bankers and money lenders also, and it is probable that a good deal of Heriot's money was made in this business. The office of court jeweller must, down to a recent date, have been in most countries one requiring a good deal of tact and discretion. Such persons were continually in the thick of all sorts of difficulties and scandals, and were applied to for help by courtiers and fine people in desperate straits. The famous firm of Boehmer & Bossinge, crown jewellers of France, who supplied the diamond necklace, no doubt " knew a thing or two " of the court gossip of those days quite as curious as the details which Charles Greville so enjoyed pumping out of the royal brother's old valet-de-chambre. Rundell was quite up to dealing with his " august" customers.

" What a heap of money you must make, Rundell !" said the Duke of York, walking round the shop and poking his nose into everything, one day. " Pretty well, your Royal Highness, but," with an unmistakable inflection in his voice, " we sometimes have to wait a long time for our money." A check was sent very soon afterwards.


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 5th July 1875

Trev.


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