Restaurantware Suppliers In Silverwares

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Traintime
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Restaurantware Suppliers In Silverwares

Postby Traintime » Fri Dec 29, 2017 1:00 pm

Both large and small suppliers in this field have been known to place a name or trademark upon silverware products in place of an established maker mark. Several are known, others remain undocumented. This would be a place to add any information that might help trace odds names back to the origins of the actual maker, be it an established silvermaker or a factory opened by the owners of the supply company itself.

SIEGEL, COOPER & Co.--marks or brands unknown.
Dry Goods Reporter Vol. 5 1905 has revealed that the Siegel, Cooper & Company store in Manhattan New York was active in the Hotel Supply Field. Since this information has just come to light, it is not yet known what lines they carried or whether they are among those who replaced maker names. Just one to be on the lookout for until more is known.

Traintime
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Re: Restaurantware Suppliers In Silverwares

Postby Traintime » Tue Feb 20, 2018 3:34 am

The Dohrman Hotel Supply Company (San Francisco, Ca) applied for a trademark on the name DOHRCO in 1947 (granted 1949) claiming first use on silverware items (delineated) from 01 January 1928. [Additional following word marks such as Pacific, Gramercy, etc. may be pattern names.]

Traintime
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Re: Restaurantware Suppliers In Silverwares

Postby Traintime » Tue Feb 27, 2018 4:53 pm

CODE CRACKING:

For those collectors trying to match their identifiable commercial silverware to the correct china service that it accompanied, this may help you where John Maddock & Sons is concerned. The impressed crown and numeral date coding system appears to have started during the reign of Victoria (still trying to break this code) and runs through Edward VII & George V. At some point, an ink stamped letter-number code begins. So far, I believe the letters are sequentially ordered to represent years and may have started with "A" around the time of George's demise in January 1936. Why? All later letter codes (V, W, etc.) appear in the era of "Ultra Vitrified" wares with backstamps dating from 1955+. Additionally, sometime prior to 1972 the code system changes to a straight number-number stamp (i.e. Month/Year such as 5/72). Logically, if "Z" occurs during the 1960's, then "A" must have begun after c.1936. If I can ultimately find the actual switch-over dates, I will post them for you. (It is not known if the number after a letter, such as "W-4", represents a month or a quarter.) All of this is preliminary work only and not conclusive. Hope this helps you match your services to your silver. Maddock wares were used around the globe.

Traintime
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Re: Restaurantware Suppliers In Silverwares

Postby Traintime » Tue Feb 27, 2018 5:47 pm

EGYPTIAN POSSIBILITIES:

A piece of commercial china has surfaced raising supplier questions. The size of a small oval vegetable bowl (like a soap dish), it bears the late-era topmark for the European-based Wagons-Lits Company surround by an "Arabic" design. The backstamp indicates "Egypt" and "Mostorod" for the source. Wagons-Lits aquired control of Cook in the late 1920's when the latter firm controlled a fleet of Nile River Boats based in Cairo. (They may have had hotels also). Mostorod is apparently an oil production region near Cairo. The china is decorated in maroon, roughly indicating 1970's-1980's when Wagons-Lits went to this color. If there was a shift from traditional European china suppliers at this time, there may have also been a change in silverware suppliers to a middle-east source. (Any information on regional sources could be helpful if you have it.) Something new to watch for.

Traintime
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Re: Restaurantware Suppliers In Silverwares

Postby Traintime » Sat Mar 10, 2018 6:40 pm

Link to early history of B. Nathan/Nathan-Dohrmann/Dohrmann Commercial Co. : https://www.immigrantentrepreneurship.o ... hp?rec=241

Add'l--M. Seller of M. Seller & Co. Portland/Seattle/Spokane (serving near states) died in 1915, but firm survived. In 1916, Seller purchased stock and goodwill of the Portland-based Prael, Hegele & Co. with intent to close the latter. Dohrmann Hotel Supply, formed in this era, eventually occupies the territory where Seller operated including Salt Lake City. As stated in notes from above link, all crockery companies normally dealt in flatwares (ie, silverwares).

Traintime
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Re: Restaurantware Suppliers In Silverwares

Postby Traintime » Sun Mar 11, 2018 1:39 pm

Washington State records of corporations operating there show Dohrman Hotel Supply (San Fran. based) working in 1918. In addition, Brodie Hotel Supply (c.1969-1980's) becomes Brodie/Dohrmann through aquisitions over time...sells out to S. E. Rykoff. (Brodie silverware can be back-marked with their name.)

Traintime
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Re: Restaurantware Suppliers In Silverwares

Postby Traintime » Wed May 09, 2018 10:55 am

A hammered-metal silverplated fork bearing a topmark (script name) for Liggett's was spotted with a supplier name (back cast) for Barth-Pick. Albert Pick was formally incorporated during the 1920's and subsequently merged with the L. Barth Company in that decade. Pick had specialized in design and set-up of dining services, especially commissary and lunch-room types, as well as acting as a supplier. Liggett's Drug Store chain was separate but related to Louis Liggett's United Drug Company. This firm also controlled the Rexall branding used by other chains. In addition, a specially equipped Rexall Train toured the United States during the 1930's promoting the company's products [An unidentified dining service could exist for the Pullman car carried in the train, staffed by Pullman]. So far, none of the Liggett china is known to carry a supplier backstamp. How far Pick and/or Barth went into providing the dining supplies, and for how long, is not clear.

Traintime
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Re: Restaurantware Suppliers In Silverwares

Postby Traintime » Thu Jun 07, 2018 12:24 pm

The hammered metal flatware mentioned above would likely be the Franklin Pattern of 1919- (also made under the E.H.H. Smith company mark).

Traintime
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Re: Restaurantware Suppliers In Silverwares

Postby Traintime » Tue Sep 11, 2018 8:51 am

Clarifying notes on commercial flatware carrying Victor S(ilver) Company mark. Victor was originally a brand name of Derby Silver Company used only on holloware, Derby having ceased production of flatware sometime before c.1879 (using old Redfield & Rice tooling). While Derby became part of International Silver Company, the Victor name did not appear on flatware until c.1922. However, patterns used for Victor date back to at least 1905 and were produced by differing member firms at their plants. International had a commercial or hotel division from the early 1900's until 1972 (when it became World Tableware). Wares for this division would have come from the varying plants carrying their own marks until the Victor name came into use for that line (and possibly concurrent with that useage). Victor was not a division, but a brand and only for commercial clients on flatware.

Traintime
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Re: Restaurantware Suppliers In Silverwares

Postby Traintime » Wed Sep 12, 2018 11:35 pm

A museumy site covering The Liquid Carbonic Corporation which supplied Wm A. Rogers 1899- Lenora Pattern (b/s "The Liquid" in horizontal Diamond) for soda fountains they designed: https://www.drugstoremuseum.com/soda-fo ... rbonic-co/


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