Online Encyclopedia of Silver Marks, Hallmarks & Makers' Marks
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Tiffany Silver Marks & Dates

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Tiffany Marks
A • c.1848 ~ 1852 Tiffany, Young & Ellis (J.C. Moore, maker)
B • c. 1853 (J.C. Moore, maker)
C • c.1854 ~ 1869 (J.C. Moore & Son, maker)
D • 1873 ~ 1891 (directorship of Edward Moore)
E • 1892 ~ 1902 (directorship of Charles L. Tiffany)
F • 1902 ~ 1907 (directorship of Charles T. Cook)
G • 1907 ~ 1947 (directorship of John C. Moore II)
H • 1947 ~ 1956 (directorship of Louis deBebian Moore)
 I • 1956 ~ c.1965 (directorship of William T. Lusk)
J • c. 1965 ~ Present (directorship initial discontinued)

Pompeian Cigar Lamp, c.1859


Sterling Salver, c.1864


Sterling "Tiffany Pattern" Forks, c.1869


Japanesque Sterling Box, c.1873


"Raspberry Vine" Server, c.1890s


Cast Sterling Dish, c.1926
Makers' Marks and Date Indicators

There are many variations in the maker's marks used by Tiffany & Co., the examples illustrated are intended to give a basic guideline to the holloware markings.  A more complete listing of the mark variations can be found in Charles H. Carpenter's fine book, "Tiffany Silver".
In the early years, a number of different silversmiths supplied Tiffany with silver holloware & flatware and marked the pieces with their own marks as well as the Tiffany marks.  The examples illustrated here include only John C. Moore's mark, some others were: William Gale, John Polhemus, Henry Hebbard, William Bogert, Grosjean & Woodward, Gale & Hughes, Wood & Hughes, and Moore & Hebbard.
After the Moore silversmithing firm was absorbed into Tiffany & Co. (1868) and Tiffany began the production of its own silverware, it became the tradition to mark each piece with the initial of the Artistic Director or President of the firm.  This practice continued until the mid-1960's.  


Tiffany & Company ~ A Brief History
The Tiffany dynasty was founded in 1837 at 259 Broadway in New York City by Charles Louis Tiffany and partner John B. Young.  It began not as a jewelry & silver emporium, but as a purveyor of stationery and fancy goods under the name Tiffany & Young.  Although America was in a deep economic recession, the store soon acquired a respected name and flourished with its quality merchandise imported from Europe, India and the Orient.  In 1841, a new partner, J. L. Ellis joined the firm and the name changed to Tiffany, Young & Ellis.  The first of the Tiffany "Blue Book" catalogs appeared in 1845 and with it the first indications of silver merchandise carried; a small range of personal items and all, almost certainly, imported.
The firm expanded to larger quarters at 271 Broadway in 1847, the move enabled a significant increase in the retailing of silver and jewelry.   It is here that American made silver finally took its place alongside the Tiffany name.  The goods were made mostly by New York City silversmiths and often bore their maker's marks, as well as the Tiffany retailer's mark.  
1851 was an important year in the history of American silver, Tiffany, Young & Ellis, seeking to give their silver goods distinction, became the first American firm to introduce the use of the English Sterling (.925) standard in American made silver.  Deciding that they wanted more control, they contracted with the firm of John C. Moore, one the finest American holloware silversmithies, to produce exclusively for Tiffany's.
Both Young & Ellis retired in 1853, giving Charles Tiffany control of the firm, again he moved it to larger quarters at 550 Broadway and the name was changed to that which we know today, Tiffany & Company.  
Over the next two decades, Tiffany worked closely with J. C. Moore and, increasingly with his son, Edward Chandler Moore, who had fully taken the reins of Moore concern in the 1860's.  Together, the artist Moore and the businessman Tiffany, created many landmark pieces of American silver and spread the fame of Tiffany & Company silverware.  In 1867, at the Exposition Universelle in Paris, Tiffany's became the first American firm to win an award for excellence in silver.  
Charles L. Tiffany made a landmark decision in 1868, he reached an agreement with Edward C. Moore and purchased the Moore firm.  At this juncture, Tiffany & Company became a silver manufacturer as well as a silver retailer.   For his part, Edward Moore became a Tiffany stockholder and the general manager of the silverware end of the business.   His first important step was to expand production to include flatware manufacturing.  In 1869 "Tiffany", the company's first flatware pattern, premiered and the firm moved to new and larger quarters on Union Square.
Moore was a cultured man, an avid world traveler and collector of art and objects of the Near & Far East.  As the Aesthetic Movement style became fashionable, his innovative nature and knowledge of Eastern art combined with his superlative design skills to bring Tiffany's to the forefront of American silver manufacturers.  Many of the finest Japanesque and Moorish Revival objects ever created, including major presentation pieces, were made by Tiffany & Company at this time.  
By the time of Edward Moore's death in 1891, Tiffany & Co. had won major awards at successive European and American Expositions and had become the most internationally respected American silver manufacturer.  The founder, Charles L. Tiffany passed on in 1902, leaving a legacy based on sound business judgement and goods of exceptional quality.
Tiffany & Company moved to its present quarters at 5th Avenue & 57th Street in 1940 and remained in the hands of the Tiffany & Moore families until 1955.
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Tiffany Holloware Pattern Dating


Tiffany & Company's use of Pattern Numbers allows us to date when a design was first put into production. As many popular designs were produced for many years, they only provide a guide to the earliest date a piece could have been produced. However, using them in conjunction with the information provided by the maker's mark can often give a fairly accurate circa date.
Order numbers are, for all intents and purposes, not useful to us. They were used "in house" to keep track of production. Without access to the Tiffany archives, they have no real meaning.  
Tiffany Holloware Pattern Numbers
  • 1851    ~    1
  • 1856    ~    301
  • 1860    ~    1,001
  • 1865    ~    1,551
  • 1870    ~    2,251
  • 1875    ~    3,801
  • 1876    ~    4,545
  • 1877    ~    4,620
  • 1878    ~    5,050
  • 1879    ~    5,370
  • 1880    ~    5,910
  • 1881    ~    6,260
  • 1882    ~    6,760
  • 1883    ~    7,300
  • 1884    ~    7,840
  • 1885    ~    8,340
  • 1886    ~    8,800
  • 1887    ~    9,260
  • 1888    ~    9,660
  • 1889    ~    10,120
  • 1890    ~    10,400
  • 1891    ~    10,820
  • 1892    ~    11,140
  • 1893    ~    11,520
  • 1894    ~    11,940
  • 1895    ~    12,220
  • 1896    ~    12,600
  • 1897    ~    13,040
  • 1898    ~    13,510
  • 1899    ~    13,900
  • 1900    ~    14,250
  • 1901    ~    14,650
  • 1902    ~    15,145
  • 1903    ~    15,550
  • 1904    ~    15,943
  • 1905    ~    16,356
  • 1906    ~    16,555
  • 1907    ~    16,849
  • 1908    ~    17,103
  • 1909    ~    17,272
  • 1910    ~    17,596
  • 1911    ~    17,880
  • 1912    ~    18,190
  • 1913    ~    18,395
  • 1914    ~    18,601
  • 1915    ~    18,808
  • 1916    ~    18,996
  • 1917    ~    19,193
  • 1918    ~    19,460
  • 1919    ~    19,521
  • 1920    ~    19,683
  • 1921    ~    19,831
  • 1922    ~    20,021
  • 1923    ~    20,160
  • 1924    ~    20,296
  • 1925    ~    20,470
  • 1926    ~    20,664
  • 1927    ~    20,845
  • 1928    ~    21,177
  • 1929    ~    21,352
  • 1930    ~    21,470
  • 1931    ~    21,724
  • 1932    ~    21,855
  • 1933    ~    21,950
  • 1934    ~    21,987
  • 1935    ~    22,100
  • 1936    ~    22,280
  • 1937    ~    22,360
  • 1938    ~    22,575
  • 1939    ~    22,650
  • 1940    ~    22,850
  • 1941    ~    22,950
  • 1942    ~    23,140
  • 1944    ~    23,164
  • 1945    ~    23,177
  • 1946    ~    23,204
  • 1947    ~    23,238
  • 1948    ~    23,250
  • 1949    ~    23,274
  • 1950    ~    23,310
  • • • •
    Sources:
    Tiffany Silver
    Charles H. Carpenter Jr. with Mary Grace Carpenter (rev. ed.)
    Alan Wofsy, 1997


    Elegant Plate: Three Centuries of Precious Metals in New York City
    Deborah Dependahl Waters ed.
    Museum of the City of New York, 2000


    Silver in America, 1840-1940: A Century of Splendour
    Charles L. Venable
    Harry N. Abrams, 1994


    Collecting American 19th Century Silver
    Katherine Morrison McClinton
    Bonanza, 1968


    Marks of Achievement: Four Centuries of American Presentation Silver
    D. B. Warren, K. S. Howe & M. K. Brown
    Harry N. Abrams, 1987
    Related Pages:
    American Silver Marks Menu

    Gorham Date Marks

    Kirk Date Marks

    Reed & Barton Dates

    Stieff Date Marks

    Tuttle Date Marks

    Whiting Date Marks

    Arthur Stone Marks

    Silverplate Trademarks

    American Flatware Patterns

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